236 episodios

A national feminist current affairs program for community radio. A gender analysis of contemporary issues, as well as in-depth analysis by a range of women and gender diverse people around Australia and internationally. Distributed nationally on the Community Radio Network (CRN).


You can listen to some of our previous shows here: www.3cr.org.au/womenontheline/itunes

Women on the Line Amy McMurtrie, Anya Saravanan, Ayan Shirwa, Emma Hart, and Iris Lee

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A national feminist current affairs program for community radio. A gender analysis of contemporary issues, as well as in-depth analysis by a range of women and gender diverse people around Australia and internationally. Distributed nationally on the Community Radio Network (CRN).


You can listen to some of our previous shows here: www.3cr.org.au/womenontheline/itunes

    Coronavirus Supplement

    Coronavirus Supplement

    It’s been almost a month since eligible Australian’s started receiving their Coronavirus Supplement. This extra $550 a fortnight payment was the government’s financial response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This week we're joined by Kristin O'Connell from the Australian Unemployed Workers’ Union to help us make sense of the supplement, and why our government insists on punishing the poor. Produced and Presented by Ayan Shirwa

    Care work & disability and the 1919 Pandemic

    Care work & disability and the 1919 Pandemic

    This week we look at two different areas, but both relating back to this current pandemic.Many disabled and chronically ill people have been navigating living at home long before the pandemic and have been supporting each other through it. In the first half of the show we hear from writer and facilitator Julia Rose Bak on care work in disabled communities, and bittersweet reflections on how non-disabled people are engaging in more community support in this moment. See their piece, Coronavirus Shows Care Work Isn’t Just for Disabled Communities Anymore. Also mentioned: sick woman theory, by Johanna HedvaSecond, we go back over 100 years to the influenza pandemic of 1919. What parallels exist between 1919 and today and what lessons can we draw from the pandemic in 1919? We hear later from amateur local and social historian Liz Crash (@AsFarce), who speaks to the social and political context of 1919, and parallels in the western suburbs of Melbourne. Transcript on google docs. 

    Doing two jobs at once: working from home, caring responsibilities and COVID-19

    Doing two jobs at once: working from home, caring responsibilities and COVID-19

    What is it like working from home for women and people with caring responsibilities? How can we expect women and carers to do two jobs at once?May the 1st is May Day, an important day for workers, and this week on the program we look at work under COVID-19 through a feminist lens.We'll hear a personal account of someone working from home with two children undertaking remote learning, and speak with Wil Stracke, one of the assistant secretaries at the Victorian Trades Hall Council.

    Immigration Detention during COVID19

    Immigration Detention during COVID19

    This week on Women on the Line, we explore how the COVID19 pandemic is affecting people in immigration detention both in the US and here in Australia. First, we listen to a conversation between Max Castle from 3CR Community Radio's Thursday Breakfast, and Maru Mora-Villalpando, a community organiser working in Seattle/Tacoma, Washington, about the threat of coronavirus outbreaks in US immigration detention centres. After that, we listen to Sumarlinah, a writer, editor, dancer, and community organiser currently living on Wurundjeri land, about what COVID19 restrictions mean for people in immigration detention in Australia. 

    Working together (and staying apart) during COVID-19

    Working together (and staying apart) during COVID-19

    It’s a strange time at the moment, a time to stick together, while doing our best to physically stay apart. This week on the program we speak with epidemiologist Dr Meru Sheel based at the Australian National University about the public health implications of COVID-19 and the best things we can be doing to work towards solidarity in community and global health at this time. We also hear from Sally McManus, Secretary of the Australian Council of Trade Unions, on the impact of the pandemic on casual workers and unemployed people, and the push to support those in insecure work.

    Intersectionality

    Intersectionality

    This week on Women on the Line, we hear a speech by social theorist and activist Professor Patricia Hill Collins on why intersectionality matters. This talk was recorded at the Activism at the Margins conference organised by RMIT University.  Professor Patricia Hill Collins is Distinguished University Professor of Sociology Emerita at the University of Maryland, College Park and Charles Phelps Taft Professor Emerita of African American Studies at the University of Cincinnati. Professor Collins has taught at several institutions, held editorial positions with professional journals, lectured widely in the United States and internationally, served in many capacities in professional organizations, and has acted as consultant for a number of community organizations. In 2008, she became the 100th President of the American Sociological Association, the first African American woman elected to this position in the organization’s 104-year history. In this speech, Professor Collins explores how intersectionality might inform new understandings of political solidarity within historically subordinated communities that are involved in activist projects. 

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