42 episodes

Ratbags, Peaceniks and Agents of Change. Resistance radio that explores the movements that made us, drawing from the activist archives through to voices of resistance today. We take you under the hood to see how collectives and campaigns are formed, mobilise people, work cooperatively to transform systems of oppression and are sustained over time.

Acting Up‪!‬ programming@3cr.org.au (3CR Programming)

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Ratbags, Peaceniks and Agents of Change. Resistance radio that explores the movements that made us, drawing from the activist archives through to voices of resistance today. We take you under the hood to see how collectives and campaigns are formed, mobilise people, work cooperatively to transform systems of oppression and are sustained over time.

    Listening Notes: What China's commitment to carbon neutrality means for Morrison's gas plans; Freedom Street documentary shows how the externalisation of Australia's migration control policies impacts refugees in Indonesia

    Listening Notes: What China's commitment to carbon neutrality means for Morrison's gas plans; Freedom Street documentary shows how the externalisation of Australia's migration control policies impacts refugees in Indonesia

    Photo: Pioneer Of Freedom Street IV housing hundreds of refugees in Makassar City, Indonesia. Photo courtesy of Alfred Pek What China's commitment to carbon neutrality means for Morrison's gas plans In a statement at the United Nations General Assembly in September China’s leader Xi Jinping committed his country to carbon neutrality by 2060. If China is serious about this pledge, there are huge implications for Australia’s fossil fuel industry and the Federal Government’s plans for a gas-led Covid-19 recovery. Hao Tan is an Associate Professor with the Newcastle Business School, University of Newcastle with research interests in China’s energy and resource transitions. He joined me on Listening Notes to discuss these developments. Hao Tan and his colleagues have written China just stunned the world with its step-up on climate action – and the implications for Australia may be huge. Link to paper Here Freedom denied: The impact of the externalisation of Australia's migrant control policies on refugees in Indonesia Alfred Pek is a filmmaker, video journalist and refugee advocate based in Sydney, Australia. He’s currently working on Freedom Street, a documentary about three refugees living in Makassar, Indonesia, and the impact of Australia’s external migration control policies on their lives. Fundraising website below:https://documentaryaustralia.com.au/project/freedom-street/  To find out more about how Australia's externalised migration control policies function in Indonesia check out:Policy Paper: Externalisation of Migration Control Policies: An Introduction by Amy Nethery and Asher Hirsh, Comparative Network on Refugee Externalisation Policies (CONREP) April, 2020 here Quote from the above paper: Externalisation policies undermine human rights principles, violate international law, cause significant harm for refugees and people seeking asylum, and undermine the entire system of refugee protection. Such policies must be resisted and challenged to protect the rights of asylum seekers and refugees, including through legal challenges in domestic and international fora, democratic institutions, civil society and grassroots movements. Nethery and Hirsh 2020, p.14   

    Listening Notes: Special Report on Aged Care and Covid-19 too little, too late; Malaysian Federation fails to deliver for Sabah and Sarawak

    Listening Notes: Special Report on Aged Care and Covid-19 too little, too late; Malaysian Federation fails to deliver for Sabah and Sarawak

    Photo: Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia,  by ej yao Unsplash Special Report on Aged care and Covid-19: Not a lot of actionThe Special Report into the Covid-19 pandemic released October 1st by the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety, contains “a lot of information and not a lot of action”, according to Professor Joseph Ibrahim. Joseph is from the Health Law and Ageing Research Unit in the Department of Forensic Medicine at Monash University. He joined me to discuss a paper he'd written for The Conversation entitled Older Australians deserve more than the aged care royal commission's COVID-19 report delivers here. Joseph is concerned that the report doesn't offer a clear picture of what went wrong and that the recommendations fall short and come too late.Also see Rick Moreton's article Care Deficit published in the Saturday Paper, Oct. 10-14th on the neglect of aged care in the Federal Budget.Colonial legacy behind talk of secession in Sabah and SarawakProfessor James Chin is the Director of the Asia Institute Tasmania. He studies governance issues in Sotheast Asia, in particular in Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia. He's wrirtten a paper for The Conversation entitled Is Malaysia heading for BorneoExit? Why some in East Malaysia are advocating secession here. James discuses the colonial history of Sabah and Sarawak, the Malaysian Federation's failure to deliver on its agreements and what it could do to resolve the problems.  

    Listening Notes: Victoria's Covid-19 Omnibus Bill “unprecedented, excessive and open to abuse”; Ending the silence on infertility in Australia

    Listening Notes: Victoria's Covid-19 Omnibus Bill “unprecedented, excessive and open to abuse”; Ending the silence on infertility in Australia

    Covid-19 Omnibus Bill: "Unprecedented, excessive and open to abuse" The Covid-19 Omnibus (Emergency Measures) and Other Acts Amendment Bill 2020 passed the Victorian House of Assembly on September 18th and is headed for the Legislative Council. But statements by the Victorian Aboriginal Legal Service here, Human Rights Watch here and the Victorian Bar here are saying the Bill goes too far in broadening the powers of the police with little or no oversight. Jude McCulloch is a Professor Emerita of Criminology at Monash University and has worked for many years as a lawyer in community legal centres. She’s written a paper for The Conversation entitled Expanding Victoria’s police powers without robust, independent oversight is a dangerous idea here. She joined me last Thursday to discuss the Bill and why so many legal and human rights groups are concerned. Update: On Wednesday, October 7, the Age reported that the Victorian Government had modified the Bill to address concerns about detention powers here Sianan Healy is an historian from La Trobe University. She’s begun work on an oral history study of the ways in which women’s experiences of infertility have changed since the post-war period from 1950 to 2010. She joins me on Listening Notes to discuss the research; why it’s needed, the response she’s had from women so far and how people wishing to participate in the study can become involved. Sianan sees her research as a beginning in the work of recording the history of infertility in Australia.  

    Listening Notes: Banning mobile phones in immigration detention cruel, unnecessary; Myanmar's Rohingya Genocide

    Listening Notes: Banning mobile phones in immigration detention cruel, unnecessary; Myanmar's Rohingya Genocide

    Proposed mobile phone ban for detainees unnecessary, adds to trauma The Migration Amendment (prohibiting items in immigration detention facilities) Bill 2020 would allow the Minister to deem mobile phones and other internet devices “prohibited items” and grant staff new powers to search detainees without a warrant and allow strip searches and detector dogs within the centres. Groups like Amnesty International, The Australian Medical Association and the Australian Human Rigts Commission have raised concerns about the Bill and the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre (ASRC) is conducting a campaign to prevent the Bill passing the Senate. Jana Favero is the Director of Campaigns at the ASRC. We discuss how the measures contained in the Bill would affect people currently in and outside detention, the impact of Covid-19 on the people they're seeing at the ASRC and the September Hope Appeal to support the opening of a new community centre in Dandenong.  Myanmar's Rohingya GenocideMost of us remember the images on our television screens in 2017, of the Rohingya people fleeing from Myanmar to Bangladesh in the face of the extreme violence against them by the Myanmar military and civilians. Dr Ronan Lee is a visiting scholar at Queen Mary University of London’s International State Crime Initiative. He conducted in-depth interviews with Rohingya people during his PhD research and his book, Myanmar’s Rohingya Genocide: Identity, History and Hate Speech, published by Bloomsbury this month, draws on that research. Ronan discusses the history of the Rohingya people, how their citizenship rights deteriorated from 1962 and the genocide case against Myanmar in the International Court of Justice. We also look at concerns about Australia's training of Myanmar military, a matter raised with Foreign Minister Marise Payne by Human Rights Watch in February this year. See Human Rights Watch press release here. Also check out the 3CR Thursday Breakfast podcast for September 3rd to hear a conversation with JN Joniad, a Rohingya refugee and journalist presently living in Jakarta, Indonesia.   

    Listening Notes: Stranded assets and Scott Morrison's gas-fuelled folly; Australian Super funds move toward a net zero emissions future

    Listening Notes: Stranded assets and Scott Morrison's gas-fuelled folly; Australian Super funds move toward a net zero emissions future

     These gasfields: If they were viable industry would already have developed themLast Tuesday Scott Morrison announced the Federal Government's plan for a gas-led recovery from the coronavirus recession. Described by Katharine Murphy in The Guardian as A gas-fuelled calamity, the plan has been widely criticised for not being financially viable, a boondoggle to the fossil fuel industry and ignoring the urgent need for action on climate change.Cam Walker is the campaigns coordinator for Friends of the Earth Australia. He outlines the problems with the Government's gas plan, describes what a green-led recovery would look like and encourages us to check out the Market Forces report on who’s funding fossil fuels in Australia. Global Day of Action: Fund our Future Not Gas!https://www.schoolstrike4climate.com/ Super funds moving toward net zero emissions by 2050While Scott Morrison refuses to commit to net zero carbon emissions by 2050, a new report has found that Australian Superannuation funds are following the advice of financial regulators and moving toward a net zero emissions future by 2050. Last week ClimateWorks released the results of research conducted with 20 Australian Superannuation Funds as part of its Net Zero Momentum Tracker series. The report shows that, while there’s still a way to go, results are encouraging. Amandine Denis-Ryan, Head of National Programs at Climateworks, joined me to discuss the report.   

    Listening Notes: Predators, prey and moonlight singing in Australian wildlife; 'A bit rich'- business groups call for urgent action on climate change after 30 years of opposition

    Listening Notes: Predators, prey and moonlight singing in Australian wildlife; 'A bit rich'- business groups call for urgent action on climate change after 30 years of opposition

    Predators, prey and moonlight singing: how phases of the Moon affect Australian wildlifeLast week Alice Gorman, an Associate Professor in Archeology and Space Studies at Flinders University, told us about the need to conserve the Moon's environment and protect it from potential exploitation by mining interests. This week we hear from three early career researchers, Ashton Dickerson, University of Melbourne, Grant Linley, Charles Sturt University and Kate Senior, University of Melbourne, about the way phases of the Moon affect Australian wildlife. They tell us what attracted them to environmental sciences, what they're discovering through their research and how they felt when they heard about a recent study showing that environmental scientists are being silenced. How business organisations shafted climate policy in Australia and their sudden about faceDr Marc Hudson is a post-doctoral fellow with the Centre for Understanding Sustainable Prosperity at Keele University. His PhD research investigated the strategic responses of incumbents to proposals for carbon pricing over thirty years of Australian political history, from 1989 to 2011. We speak with him about that history,  his paper,  A bit rich: business groups want urgent climate action after resisting it for 30 years, and speculate about why the sudden change from industry groups represented on the Climate Roundtable.   

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