298 episodes

The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

LSE: Public lectures and events London School of Economics and Political Science

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

    The Global Infrastructure Gap: potential perils, and a framework for distinction

    The Global Infrastructure Gap: potential perils, and a framework for distinction

    Contributor(s): Professor Peter Henry |
    In a 2015 communique, the World Bank claimed that rich-country private capital could close the infrastructure services gap, achieve the sustainable development goals, and make money by moving from “billions to trillions” in infrastructure investment in poor countries. This lecture introduces an equilibrium framework. The framework compares a poor country’s social rate of return on infrastructure investment with: (a) the poor country’s return on private capital, and (b) the average rich country’s return on private capital. Applying the framework to the existing, comprehensive cross-country estimates of the social rate of return on infrastructure, reveals, contrary to the World Bank’s claim, that only 7 of 53 poor countries clear the dual-hurdle rate in both paved roads and electricity.
    Meet our speaker and chair
    Peter Henry (@PeterBlairHenry) is WR Berkley Professor of Economics and Finance and Dean Emeritus at NYU’s Stern School of Business, and Principal Investigator the Ph.D. Excellence Initiative, a post-baccalaureate program that addresses underrepresentation in economics by mentoring exceptional students of color interested in pursuing doctoral studies. He is the author of numerous peer-reviewed articles, as well as Turnaround: Third World Lessons for First World Growth.
    Tim Besley is Professor of Economics and Political Science and Sir W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science.
    More about this event
    The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at LSE, is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching.
    This event is in honour of W. Arthur Lewis. He taught at LSE from 1938 until 1948 and went on to serve as an economic advisor to numerous African and Caribbean governments. He received a Nobel Prize in Economics in 1979, sharing it with Theodore Shultz, “for their pioneering research into economic development research with particular consideration of the problems of developing countries".
    This event also forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19


    Live captions

    • 4 sec
    What does it really mean to be a citizen?

    What does it really mean to be a citizen?

    Contributor(s): Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey, Dr Ian Sanjay Patel, Dr Megan Ryburn | Citizenship. What does that word really signify? This episode of LSE IQ takes a look at the issue in all its complexities, uncovering how decisions made by a 19th century West African Gola ruler connect to today’s Liberian land ownership laws; why British citizenship became racialised in the decades following the second world war – legislation that led to the Windrush Scandal, devastating the lives of hundreds of black Britons; and how Bolivian migrants in the present day have struggled to create new lives in Chile.
    To understand more about the many ways citizenship can impact our lives, Jess Winterstein spoke to Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey, Dr Ian Sanjay Patel and Dr Megan Ryburn
    Speakers: Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey, Dr Ian Sanjay Patel and Dr Megan Ryburn
     
    Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey, Department of Social Policy, LSE
    https://www.lse.ac.uk/social-policy/people/academic-staff/dr-robtel-neajai-pailey
    Dr Ian Sanjay Patel, Department of Sociology, LSE
    https://www.lse.ac.uk/sociology/people/ian-patel
    Dr Megan Ryburn, Latin America and Caribbean Centre (LACC), LSE
    https://www.lse.ac.uk/lacc/people/megan-ryburn
     
    Research Development, (Dual) Citizenship and its Discontents in Africa: The political economy of belonging to Liberia by Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey (Cambridge University Press). To read the Introduction free of charge see https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/development-dual-citizenship-and-its-discontents-in-africa/B96CB2D100CFEC03EE476D103F46348B# The ebook is also available in the LSE library.
    We’re Here Because You Were There: Immigration and the end of empire by Dr Ian Sanjay Patel (Verso) https://www.versobooks.com/books/3700-we-re-here-because-you-were-there
    Uncertain Citizenship: everyday practices of Bolivian migrants in Chile by Dr Megan Ryburn (University of California Press). https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520298774/uncertain-citizenship

    • 2 sec
    Liars: falsehoods and free speech in an age of deception

    Liars: falsehoods and free speech in an age of deception

    Contributor(s): Professor Andrés Velasco | Join us to hear from Harvard law professor Cass Sunstein speaking about his new book.
    Voter fraud, the legitimacy of COVID-19, and fake news are just a few examples of the lies that have recently been spreading like wildfire. Lying has been around for as long as we can remember but today is different, and in many respects, worse. Falsehoods are amplified as never before through powerful social media platforms that reach billions. And unfriendly governments, including Russia, are circulating lies in order to destabilize other nations, including the United Kingdom and the United States. In the face of those problems, Cass Sunstein probes the fundamental question of how we can deter lies while also protecting freedom of speech in his new book Liars: Falsehoods and Free Speech in an Age of Deception.
    Meet our speaker and chair
    Cass R. Sunstein (@CassSunstein) is currently the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. From 2009 to 2012, he was Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. He is the founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School. Professor Sunstein has testified before congressional committees on many subjects, and he has been involved in constitution-making and law reform activities in a number of nations. His latest book is Liars: Falsehoods and Free Speech in an Age of Deception.
    Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Professor of Public Policy and Dean of the School of Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science.
    More about this event
    The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Their approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.
    This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
    You can order the book, Liars: falsehoods and free speech in an age of deception, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

    • 3 sec
    For a Reparatory Social Science

    For a Reparatory Social Science

    Contributor(s): Professor Gurminder K Bhambra | The social sciences are implicated in the reproduction of the very structures of inequality that are ostensibly their objects of concern. This is partly the result of their failure to acknowledge the ‘connected histories’ of one of their primary units of analysis – the modern nation-state, postcolonial scholar Gurminder K. Bhambra will argue.
    In the inaugural Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity Keynote Lecture, Professor Bhambra will explore the social sciences’ failure to acknowledge the extent to which modern nation-states were bound up with relations of colonial extraction and domination. Without putting such relations at the heart of our analyses, we cannot address global inequality effectively. Positing colonial histories as central to national imaginaries and the structures through which inequalities are legitimated and reproduced, she will explore a framework for a reparatory social science, oriented to global justice as a reconstructive project of the present. The past cannot be undone, she will conclude, but its legacies can be transformed to bring about a world that works for us all.
    Meet our speaker and chair
    Gurminder K. Bhambra (@gkbhambra) is Professor of Postcolonial and Decolonial Studies in the School of Global Studies, University of Sussex, and a Fellow of the British Academy (2020). She was previously Professor of Sociology at the University of Warwick. She is author of Connected Sociologies and Rethinking Modernity: Postcolonialism and the Sociological Imagination and co-editor of Decolonising the University.
    Armine Ishkanian (@Armish15) is Associate Professor of Social Policy and the Executive Director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme at LSE. Her research focuses on the relationship between civil society, policy processes, and social transformation. She is co-convenor of the Politics of Inequality research theme based in the International Inequalities Institute.
    More about this event
    The Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme is a Global South-focused, funded fellowship for mid-career activists, policy-makers, researchers and movement-builders from around the world. Based at the International Inequalities Institute, it is a 20-year programme that commenced in 2017 and was funded with a £64m gift from Atlantic Philanthropies, LSE’s largest ever philanthropic donation.
    The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
    This event will have live captioning and BSL interpreters.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEInequalities

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    Rescue: from global crisis to a better world

    Rescue: from global crisis to a better world

    Contributor(s): Professor Ian Goldin |
    We are at a crossroads. The wrecking-ball of COVID-19 has destroyed global norms. Many think that after the devastation there will be a bounce back. The event will explore Ian Goldin's latest book, Rescue: From Global Crisis to a Better World.
    Ian Goldin believes that this crisis can create opportunities for change, just as the Second World War forged the ideas behind the Beveridge Report. Published in 1942, it was revolutionary and laid the foundations for the welfare state alongside a host of other social and economic reforms, changing the world for the better. Ian Goldin tackles the challenges and opportunities posed by the pandemic, ranging from globalisation to the future of jobs, income inequality and geopolitics, the climate crisis and the modern city. It is a fresh, bold call for an optimistic future and one we all have the power to create.
    Meet our speaker and chair
    Ian Goldin (@ian_goldin) is the Oxford University Professor of Globalisation and Development and was the founding Director of the Oxford Martin School. Ian leads the Oxford Martin Programmes on Technological and Economic Change, Future of Work and Future of Development. Ian previously was World Bank Vice President and the Group’s Director of Development Policy, after serving as Chief Executive of the Development Bank of Southern Africa and Economic Advisor to President Nelson Mandela. Ian is an alumnus of LSE.
    You can order the book, Rescue: From Global Crisis to a Better World, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney.
    Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Professor of Public Policy and Dean of the School of Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science.
    More about this event
    The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. It is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Their approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.
    This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

    • 3 sec
    Modern Greek Politics

    Modern Greek Politics

    Contributor(s): Professor Kevin Featherstone, Professor Brigid Laffan, Professor Kalypso Nicolaidis, Professor Dimitri A. Sotiropoulos, Professor George Tsebelis | Join us for this event that will introduce the new volume The Oxford Handbook of Modern Greek Politics, edited by Kevin Featherstone and Dimitri A. Sotiropoulos.
    This ground-breaking volume provides a panorama of Greek politics from the transition to democracy in 1974 to the present day. Its 43 chapters are written by leading Greek and international specialists, providing unprecedented breadth and authority. Join the editors in a discussion with Brigid Laffan, Kalypso Nicolaidis and George Tsebelis, concerning its major arguments and themes and the challenges for Greece.
    Meet our speakers and chair
    Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics in the European Institute at LSE, where he is also Director of the Hellenic Observatory. He was the first foreign member of the National Council for Research and Technology (ESET) in Greece, serving from 2010-2013. He has contributed regularly to international media on European and Greek politics.
    Brigid Laffan (@BrigidLaffan) is Director and Professor at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, European University Institute (EUI), Florence. She was Vice-President of UCD and Principal of the College of Human Sciences from 2004 to 2011. She was the founding director of the Dublin European Institute UCD from 1999 and in March 2004 she was elected as a member of the Royal Irish Academy.
    Kalypso Nicolaidis is professorial Chair in Transnational Governance at the EUI School of Transnational Governance in Florence. She is currently on leave from the University of Oxford where she has been Professor of International Relations and a governing body fellow at St Antony’s College at the European Studies Centre since 1999. Previously Professor at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and at ENA, she has worked with numerous EU institutions. Her last book is: Exodus, Reckoning, Sacrifice: Three Meanings of Brexit.
    LSE alumnus Dimitri A. Sotiropoulos (@DimitriASotiro1) is Professor of Political Science at the Department of Political Science and Public Administration of the University of Athens. In 2003 he was Senior Research Fellow at LSE's Hellenic Observatory, in 2009-2010 Visiting Fellow in South East European Studies at St. Antony’s College, Oxford and in the autumn of 2016 Visiting Fellow at the Science Po, Paris. In 2018-2019 he was Visiting Professor at Tufts University and Visiting Fellow at Harvard’s Center of European Studies at Princeton’s Seeger Center for Hellenic Studies.
    George Tsebelis is the Anatol Rapoport Collegiate Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan; member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; honorary PhD from the University of Crete. His work uses Game Theoretic models to analyze the effects of institutions; it covers Western European countries and the European Union. His more recent work studies institutions in Latin America and in countries of Eastern Europe, as well as Greece.
    Spyros Economides is Associate Professor in International Relations and European Politics at LSE and Deputy Director of the Hellenic Observatory. His current research concentrates on the external relations and security policies of the EU; Europeanisation and foreign policy, and the EU’s relationship with the Western Balkans. His latest publication is Economides and Sperling (eds.) EU Security Strategies: Extending the EU System of Security Governance.
    More about this event
    The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy

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