149 episodes

Interviews with historians about the history of the Ottoman Empire and beyond

Ottoman History Podcast Ottoman History Podcast

    • History
    • 5.0, 2 Ratings

Interviews with historians about the history of the Ottoman Empire and beyond

    Mitler, Gerçekler ve Yöntem

    Mitler, Gerçekler ve Yöntem

    Bölüm 470 Edhem Eldem Sunucu: Işın Taylan Son elli yılda Türkiye’de tarih yazımında neler değişti? Osmanlı tarihi çalışmalarında hangi kaynaklar, hangi yöntemlerle kullanılıyor? Bu bölümde Edhem Eldem ile son kitabı Mitler, Gerçekler ve Yöntem: Osmanlı Tarihinde Aklıma Takılanlar üzerinden tarihçiliği ve Türkiye’de tarih yazımı üzerine konuşuyoruz. « Click for More »

    Refugee Families in the Era of Global Security

    Refugee Families in the Era of Global Security

    Episode 469 with Sophia Balakian hosted by Chris Gratien Resettling refugee families sounds like a straightforwardly noble goal. But what happens when a particular definition of the family is used to restrict opportunities for resettlement? In this episode, we speak to anthropologist Sophia Balakian about how the concerns of governments and refugee organizations with "family composition fraud" have impacted refugee families that do not fit a normative definition of what constitutes a family unit. We talk about her fieldwork between East Africa and the United States, examining the spaces of refugee resettlement and their increased securitization since the beginning of the War on Terror. We discuss how genetic testing is being used to exclude certain individuals or families from resettlement programs. And Balakian reflects on how her work involving survivors of war, genocide, and migration today relates to her own questions about the past as a member of the Armenian diaspora. At the bottom of this post, we also offer an activity module for university classrooms that ties in with this podcast. « Click for More »

    Shibli Nomani's Urdu Travelogue of the Ottoman Empire

    Shibli Nomani's Urdu Travelogue of the Ottoman Empire

    Episode 468 with Gregory Maxwell Bruce hosted by Zoe Griffith In 1892, the renowned Islamic scholar and educator Shibli Nomani traveled to the Ottoman Empire, where he visited cities in modern-day Turkey, Syria, and Egypt. His travelogue, entitled Safarnāmah-i Rūm o Miṣr o Shām, was published in the Urdu language within his own lifetime. In this episode, we talk to Gregory Maxwell Bruce, the author of an annotated translation of Shibli's travelogue, which has been recently published by Syracuse University Press. In our conversation, we delve into the process of translating the travelogue and explore the South-South connections between South Asia and the Middle East revealed by Shibli Nomani's relationships and contacts during his travels in the Ottoman Empire. « Click for More »

    The Mediterranean Viewed from the Southern Shore

    The Mediterranean Viewed from the Southern Shore

    Episode 467 with Jasmin Daam, Esther Möller, Cyrus Schayegh, and Selim Deringil hosted by Andreas Guidi Modern Mediterranean history and Middle Eastern history rarely dialogue with each other. Whereas European ideas and practices of and in the Mediterranean have been studied thoroughly, only recently did researchers start to examine ideas and experiences through which actors on the Southern shore contributed to the making of the Mediterranean. In this episode, recorded in partnership with the Southeast Passage during a conference in Beirut, we discuss the relevance of the Mediterranean in Arab ideas, institutions and identity constructions in the late Ottoman and post-Ottoman period. We focus on topics such as tourism in the Mandates, spatial transformations in the former Western Arab provinces after the demise of the Ottoman Empire, emigration on sea from the coast of Lebanon, and humanitarianism in Egypt after WWII. Through such diverse perspectives, the episode asks what a focus on the Southern shore might add to our perception of the Mediterranean “liquid continent.” « Click for More »

    The Economic Roots of Modern Sudan

    The Economic Roots of Modern Sudan

    Episode 466 with Alden Young hosted by Chris Gratien As a site of recent civil wars, ethnic cleansing, and genocide, Sudan's history is often framed by violence. In this podcast, our guest Alden Young offers an alternative framing of Sudan's modern history, as we discuss Sudan's economy and its relationship to the broader Middle East from the 19th century onward. We discuss Sudan's unique experience of colonialism under Ottoman/Egyptian rule and how the issue of slavery intensified as Sudan's ties to Egypt and the broader Ottoman world intensified during the 19th century. We also discuss how colonial planners slowly reoriented Sudan's economy towards agricultural export and away from pastoralism. We explore the Gezira scheme, a long foretold irrigation project that would become the centerpiece of Sudanese economic development after independence during the 1950s. And we consider the fate of the class of Sudanese economists and technocrats who straddled the late colonial and postcolonial periods. At the bottom of this post, we also offer an activity module for university classrooms based on this podcast, a documentary about the Gezira scheme from the 1950s, and the novel Season of Migration to the North by Sudanese author Tayeb Salih. « Click for More »

    Mementos from Habsburg Life in Ottoman Istanbul

    Mementos from Habsburg Life in Ottoman Istanbul

    Episode 465 with Robyn Dora Radway hosted by Emily Neumeier What was it like to be a foreigner living in Ottoman Istanbul? In this episode, our guest Robyn Dora Radway answers this question by providing an in-depth look at an unusual type of document: alba amicorum, or friendship albums, which were essentially the social media of the sixteenth century. Produced in the Habsburg embassy (aka the “German House"), these albums functioned like yearbooks in that the owners residing in the embassy would strive to collect all manner of mementos from their time abroad, including signatures, poems, short anecdotes, and even drawings and paintings. At the German House, men from all walks of life would end up assembling their own album amicorum, from the Habsburg ambassador to the cook (who was quite popular and had the largest album by far). We discuss how these albums can thus serve as a valuable resource for historians, as they offer a full picture of the social makeup of these kinds of diplomatic spaces—information that does not often turn up in more traditional archives. « Click for More »

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