2,000 episodes

Every weekday our global network of correspondents makes sense of the stories beneath the headlines. We bring you surprising trends and tales from around the world, current affairs, business and finance—as well as science and technology.

The Economist Podcasts itunesu_sunset

    • News
    • 4.3 • 34 Ratings

Every weekday our global network of correspondents makes sense of the stories beneath the headlines. We bring you surprising trends and tales from around the world, current affairs, business and finance—as well as science and technology.

    Money Talks: Moonshooters

    Money Talks: Moonshooters

    This week Microsoft announced its biggest ever deal, spending $69bn on games publisher Activision Blizzard to advance its ambitions in gaming and the metaverse. The world’s most powerful tech companies are racing to splash their cash on frontier technologies. We crunch the numbers on where they are investing their billions and ask whether these new corporate moonshots will supercharge productivity or further entrench the giants’ dominance in the future.


    Rachana Shanbhogue hosts, with Kevin Scott, chief technology officer of Microsoft, and Margrethe Vestager, competition commissioner for the European Union. 


    Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks 
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer
     
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    • 31 min
    Drilling into the numbers: ExxonMobil

    Drilling into the numbers: ExxonMobil

    America’s biggest oil firm has long been recalcitrant on climate matters, so its new net-zero targets may seem surprising. We examine the substance of its pledges—and motivations. For an economist, tipping is an odd practice; whether you love it or hate it may be a question of control. And how unusual Novak Djokovic’s refusenik vaccine stance is among elite athletes. Additional audio courtesy of Tennis Australia. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 22 min
    Babbage: Havana syndrome

    Babbage: Havana syndrome

    New cases of Havana syndrome are baffling scientists. Alok Jha investigates the theories behind the mysterious malady plaguing Western diplomats. Are microwave weapons to blame, or could the illness have psychological origins?


    For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.
     
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    • 39 min
    Through deny of a needle: vaccine mandates

    Through deny of a needle: vaccine mandates

    Austria is set to enact a bold policy of levying fines on the unvaccinated. We look at what is driving governments to such measures, and whether they will work. Japan’s shift in thinking about its growing elderly population holds lessons for countries set for a similar demographic shift. And why the Mormon church is struggling to retain its foreign converts.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 22 min
    The World Ahead: Following the money

    The World Ahead: Following the money

    Inflation in America has reached its highest level in four decades. What is the outlook for 2022? Host Tom Standage asks former US treasury secretary Larry Summers. Meanwhile, China is pushing ahead with its plans for a “central bank digital currency”. How do such digital coins stack up against cryptocurrencies?


    Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:
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    • 28 min
    But who’s counting? Voting rights in America

    But who’s counting? Voting rights in America

    Democrats will spend the week battling for a tightening of laws on casting votes; that will overshadow Republicans’ worrying push into how those votes are counted and certified. Earthquakes remain damnably unpredictable, but new research suggests a route to early-warning systems. And why hammams, the declining bathhouses of the Arab world, will cling on despite even the challenge of covid-19. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 23 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
34 Ratings

34 Ratings

zzz8567 ,

Great podcast!

Well developed ideas, every episode has been curated concisely based on contemporary issues faced by differing regions globally, coupled with distinguished individuals makes this podcast worth listening to!

foxtrotte ,

Accent

There’s a weird female guest or presenter who speaks too fast with a strong accent. Pain in the ears for serious news.

S, R ,

Fantastic

A brilliant podcast. Thoroughly informative and professional. An absolute must listen. I would like to commend the Economist for such an invaluable podcast.

R Singh

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