300 episodes

The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

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    • Business

The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

    Destruction and corruption in Beirut

    Destruction and corruption in Beirut

    The businesses hoping to rebuild after Beirut's port explosion. Tamasin Ford speaks to Aline Kamakian, whose restaurant and office were both destroyed in the disaster, and to Joumana Saddi Chaya, managing partner at PSLab, a design company, who was also caught in the blast. Julien Courson, head of the Lebanese Transparency Association, explains why corruption remains such a persistent problem in Lebanese life and business, before and after the disaster. The BBC's diplomatic correspondent Paul Adams tells us the strange tale of the ship that delivered the explosive cargo to Beirut's port, and the failures that allowed it to stay there for so long.

    Producer: Edwin Lane

    (Photo: Smoke rises above wrecked buildings at Beirut's port a day after the devastating explosion. Credit: Getty Images)

    • 17 min
    Does online networking work?

    Does online networking work?

    Conferences during Covid-19: Jane Wakefield explores the challenges that big international events have faced this year in moving events online.

    She speaks to Paddy Cosgrave, chief executive of the giant technology event Web Summit, and Chris Anderson from TED. Plus social scientist Elizabeth Dunn explains why there is true “magic” in meeting face-to-face.

    Producer: Sarah Treanor

    (Picture: Woman on a laptop with a headache; Credit: Getty Images)

    • 18 min
    US evictions crisis?

    US evictions crisis?

    Millions of Americans face loss of benefits and eviction, threatening to push the US into a deepening recession, after Congress failed to extend the Cares Act.

    Ed Butler speaks to Maryland resident Sifu about her eviction by an aggressive landlord, while Alieza Durana of the Eviction Lab at Princeton University explains the broader impact of the lapsing legislation on tenants throughout the country.

    Michael Strain of the American Enterprise Institute think tank gives his free-market take on the effectiveness of the Cares Act and President Trump’s intervention to keep some level of benefits going. Plus Moody's chief economist Mark Zandi says the political deadlock in Washington risks economic depression.

    (Picture: Banners against eviction in Washington DC; Credit: Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images)

    • 18 min
    A family rift in Syria

    A family rift in Syria

    Why does the President of Syria seemingly want to destroy his cousin Rami Makhlouf?

    President Bashar al-Assad of Syria seems hell-bent on unseating his first cousin, and Syria's richest man, from his multi-billion dollar holdings. But Rami Makhlouf, is defying the President to his face. What's going on, what's at stake for Syria?

    Ed Butler speaks to the BBC's Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen. Plus he asks Ayman Abdel-Nour, a former economic advisor to the Syrian ruling party who knew Bashar al Assad at university, what he thinks is going on.

    (Picture: Syrian businessman Rami Makhlouf; Credit: Louai Beshara/Getty Images)

    • 18 min
    Rich and frugal?

    Rich and frugal?

    Why do some of the super rich describe themselves as frugal? Is it something about the inner psyche that makes us natural savers or spenders? Elizabeth Hotson speaks to Dolly Parton, who despite earning millions, doesn’t particularly enjoy spending it. We also hear from Karam Hinduja, banker and scion of the billionaire Hinduja family. Tech entrepreneur, Richard Skellett tells us why he sees being wealthy as a responsibility, plus we hear from big savers, Tim Connor and Francesca Armstrong. We're also joined by Sarah Fallaw, author of The Next Millionaire Next Door, Rachel Sherman, author of Uneasy Street: The Anxieties of Affluence and Elin Helander, behavioural economist, neurologist and Chief Scientific Officer at Dreams, a money-saving app. (picture of a piggy bank via Getty Images).

    • 18 min
    Business Weekly

    Business Weekly

    Lockdowns around the world has seen our energy usage plunge, but as restrictions ease will countries build back better? On Business Weekly we get the view of veteran scientist James Lovelock as he celebrates his 101st birthday. We ask him his predictions for planet earth.

    We also head to Ghana, where we take a look at efforts to reinvigorate the economy by attracting disillusioned African Americans to visit and start a new life there.
    Plus, if you’re missing watching you’re favourite bands, some artists are coming up with novel ways to get around bans on concerts.

    • 36 min

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