298 episodes

The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

    Scroungers versus Strivers: the myth of the welfare state

    Scroungers versus Strivers: the myth of the welfare state

    Contributor(s): Professor John Hills | This episode is dedicated to social policy giant Professor Sir John Hills, who died in December 2020.
    In this episode, John tackles the myth that the welfare state supports a feckless underclass who cost society huge amounts of money. Instead, he sets out a system where most of what we pay in, comes back to us. He describes a generational contract which we all benefit from, varying on our stage of life.
    His words remain timely after a year of pandemic which has devastated many people’s livelihoods. Many of us have had to rely on state support in ways that we could not have anticipated, perhaps challenging our ideas about what type of person receives benefits in the UK.
    This episode is based on an interview that John did with James Rattee for the LSE iQ podcast in 2017. It coincided with the LSE Festival which celebrated the anniversary of the publication of the ‘Beveridge Report’ in 1947 - a blueprint for a British universal care system by former LSE Director William Beveridge.
    Professor Sir John Hills CBE, was Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at LSE and Chair of CASE. His influential work didn’t just critique government policy on poverty and inequality, it changed it. He advised on a wide range of issues including pensions reform, fuel poverty, council housing, income and wealth distribution.
     
    Contributors
    Professor John Hills
     
    Research
    Good Times Bad Times: the welfare myth of them and us. Bristol: Policy Press by John Hills (2015)
     

    • 19 min
    The Costs of Connection: how data is colonizing human life and appropriates it

    The Costs of Connection: how data is colonizing human life and appropriates it

    Contributor(s): Mutale Nkonde, Professor Ulises Ali Mejias, Professor Nick Couldry | Nick Couldry and Ulises Ali Mejias will discuss their book, The Costs of Connection: How Data Colonizes Human Life and Appropriates it for Capitalism.
    Couldry and Mejias argue that the role of data in society needs to be grasped as not only a development of capitalism, but as the start of a new phase in human history that rivals in importance the emergence of historic colonialism. This new "data colonialism" is based not on the extraction of natural resources or labour, but on the appropriation of human life through data, paving the way for a further stage of capitalism. Today’s transformations of social life through data must therefore be grasped within the long historical arc of dispossession as both a new colonialism and an extension of capitalism. Resistance requires challenging in their new material guises forms of coloniality that decolonial thinking has foregrounded for centuries. The struggle will be both broader and longer than many analyses of algorithmic power suppose, but for that reason critical responses are all the more urgent. New forms of solidarity are needed that help build connection on different terms from those currently on offer.
    Meet our speakers and chair
    Nick Couldry (@couldrynick) is Professor of Media Communications and Social Theory at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and from 2017 has been a Faculty Associate at Harvard’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society. He is the author or editor of fourteen books including The Mediated Construction of Reality (with Andreas Hepp, Polity, 2016), Media, Society, World: Social Theory and Digital Media Practice (Polity 2012), Why Voice Matters (Sage 2010), and Media: Why It Matters (Polity: October 2019).
    Ulises Ali Mejias (@UlisesAliMejias) is Professor of Communication Studies and director of the Institute for Global Engagement at the State University of New York, College at Oswego. He is a media scholar whose work encompasses critical internet studies, network theory and science, philosophy and sociology of technology, and political economy of digital media. He is the author of Off the Network: Disrupting the Digital World (University of Minnesota Press, 2013).
    Mutale Nkonde (@mutalenkonde) is the founding CEO of AI For the People (AFP), a non-profit communications agency. Prior to this Mutale worked in AI Governance. During that time she was part of the team that introduced the Algorithmic and Deep Fakes Algorithmic Acts, as well as the No Biometric Barriers to Housing Act to the US House of Representatives. She started her career as a broadcast journalist and produced documentaries for the BBC, CNN & ABC. She now also writes widely on race and tech, as well as speaking at conferences across the world and currently is on a fellowship at the Digital Civil Society Lab at Stanford and an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Center of Internet and Society at Harvard.
    Bingchun Meng is an Associate Professor in the Department for Media and Communications at LSE. Her research interests include gender and the media, political economy of media industries, communication governance, and comparative media studies. She has published widely on these topic areas on leading international journals. Her book The Politics of Chinese Media: Consensus and Contestation was published by Palgrave in early 2018.
    You can order the book, The Costs of Connection (UK delivery only), from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney.
    More about this event
    The Department of Media and Communications (@MediaLSE) is a world-leading centre for education and research in communication and media studies at the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London. The Department is ranked #1 in the UK and #3 globally in the field of media and communications (2020 Q

    • 1 hr 28 min
    Making Your Voice Heard

    Making Your Voice Heard

    Contributor(s): Professor Connson Locke |
    Drawing on research from her latest book, Making Your Voice Heard, Connson Locke will look at how to develop your leadership presence and be more influential in the workplace.
    Discover a fresh approach to influence, grounded in psychological research, and learn how to make your voice heard, regardless of your background or gender. How do you exercise influence when those around you have as much or more power than you do? Where does your power come from? Connson’s book, based on her hugely popular Guardian Masterclass ‘Developing your presence, power, and influence’, draws on the latest research in social psychology and looks to answer why some people are more influential than others and what can make people take notice. This practical guide will help you hone your personal style and enhance your presence and influence.
    Meet our speaker and chair
    Connson Chou Locke (@connsonlocke) joined LSE's Department of Management in 2008 where she teaches leadership, organisational behaviour, and negotiation and decision making. She received the Department of Management Outstanding Teaching Contribution Award in 2013, was Highly Commended for Inspirational Teaching in the Student-Led Teaching Excellence Awards in 2015 and 2017, and received the LSE Excellence in Education Award in 2018. Professor Locke holds a PhD and MSc in Business Administration (Organisational Behaviour) from the University of California at Berkeley and a BA in Sociology from Harvard University where she graduated with honours.
    You can pre-order the book, Making Your Voice Heard, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney.
    Conor Gearty is a Professor of Human Rights Law at LSE.
    More about this event
    The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEVoice

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Philanthropy - from Aristotle to Zuckerberg

    Philanthropy - from Aristotle to Zuckerberg

    Contributor(s): Paul Vallely, Professor Rob Reich, Fran Perrin |
    Join us for this talk by Paul Vallely who will be discussing his new book, Philanthropy: From Aristotle to Zuckerberg.
    The super-rich are silently and secretly shaping our world. In this exploration of historical and contemporary philanthropy, author Paul Vallely reveals how this far-reaching change came about. Vivid with anecdote and scholarly insight, this survey - from the ancient Greeks to today's high-tech geeks - provides an original take on the history of philanthropy. It shows how giving has, variously, been a matter of honour, altruism, religious injunction, political control, moral activism, enlightened self-interest, public good, personal fulfilment and plutocratic manipulation. Highly engaging and meticulously researched, Paul Vallely's authoritative account of philanthropy then and now critiques the excessive utilitarianism of much modern philanthrocapitalism and points to how philanthropy can rediscover its soul.
    Meet our speakers and chair
    Fran Perrin is the Founder and Director of the Indigo Trust and was awarded an OBE in 2020 for her services to charity. Fran is also co-founder and Chair of the Board of 360Giving. She was formerly an advisor at the Prime Minister’s Strategy Unit, in the UK Cabinet Office.
    Rob Reich (@robreich) is a Professor of Political Science and, by courtesy, Professor of Philosophy at the Graduate School of Education, at Stanford University. He is the director of the Center for Ethics in Society and co-director of the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, both at Stanford University. He is the author most recently of Just Giving: Why Philanthropy is Failing Democracy and How It Can Do Better.
    Paul Vallely (@pvall) is a writer and consultant on philanthropy, ethics, religion and international development. He has worked as a journalist and campaigner with government, businesses, NGOs and churches. He produced award-winning reports from more than 30 countries, was co-author of the report of Prime Minister Tony Blair’s Commission for Africa and has advised Bob Geldof, Bono and others. He has written on political, cultural, ethical and religious issues in the New York Times, Sunday Times, Guardian, Times and Independent. He was made a CMG in the 2016 Honours List.
    You can order the book, Philanthropy - from Aristotle to Zuckerberg, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney.
    Stephan Chambers is the inaugural director of the Marshall Institute at LSE. He is also Professor in Practice at the Department of Management at LSE and Course Director for the new Executive Masters in Social Business and Entrepreneurship.
    More about this event
    The Marshall Institute (@LSEMarshall) works to improve the impact and effectiveness of private action for public benefit through research, teaching and convening.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMarshall

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Resilience

    Resilience

    Contributor(s): Professor Serene Khader, Professor Mark Neocleous, Dr David Westley, Dr David Bather Woods | What do we mean by the term ‘resilience’? We trace the philosophical traditions of resilience and explore critical perspectives on its modern forms.
    Meet our speakers and chair
    Serene Khader (@SereneKhader) is Professor and Jay Newman Chair in Philosophy of Culture at CUNY.
    Mark Neocleous is Professor of the Critique of Political Economy, Brunel University London.
    David Westley (@David_Westley) is Associate Professor of Psychology, Middlesex University.
    David Bather Woods (@dbatherwoods) is Senior Teaching Fellow in Philosophy at the University of Warwick.
    Shahidha Bari (@ShahidhaBari) is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and Professor at the University of the Arts London.
    More about this event
    The Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) is a non-profit organisation that hosts weekly events exploring science, politics, and the arts from a philosophical perspective.

    • 1 hr 14 min
    SHORTCAST | Data-driven Responses to COVID-19: opportunities and limitations

    SHORTCAST | Data-driven Responses to COVID-19: opportunities and limitations

    Contributor(s): Dr Seeta Peña Gangadharan, Dr Orla Lynskey, Dr Alison Powell, Dr Edgar Whitley | This is an event shortcast, a digested version of our live online public events series. This event was recorded on Thursday 15th October 2020. A full version is available to download on the LSE player.

    • 14 min

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