169 episodes

The Carnegie Endowment's China in the World podcast is a series of conversations between Director Paul Haenle and Chinese and international experts on China’s foreign policy, China’s international role, and China’s relations with the world.

China in the World Carnegie-Tsinghua Center

    • Government

The Carnegie Endowment's China in the World podcast is a series of conversations between Director Paul Haenle and Chinese and international experts on China’s foreign policy, China’s international role, and China’s relations with the world.

    Live Recording Replay: The Future of the China-Russia Partnership?

    Live Recording Replay: The Future of the China-Russia Partnership?

    In recent months, China and Russia have upgraded their strategic partnership, conducted joint naval drills in the Sea of Japan, and deepened collaboration on nuclear and space technology. Beijing and Moscow have also taken steps to test the credibility of U.S. alliances in the Indo-Pacific and trans-Atlantic regions. But as China-Russia ties have grown increasingly robust, Washington has become more and more concerned, labeling an “increasingly assertive China” and a “destabilizing Russia” as its chief foreign policy challenges and engaging both countries in dialogue and diplomacy.

    However, this narrative of China-Russia partnership has its limits—widening trade and economic disparities and intensifying competition for influence in Central Asia produce substantial points of tension between the two nations. How will China and Russia navigate the complex, often conflicting, dynamics in their relationship? And how might their interactions impact the United States’ regional and global strategy?

    During a live recording of the China in the World podcast, Paul Haenle spoke with Guan Guihai, Associate Professor and Executive Vice President of the Institute of International and Strategic Studies at Peking University, Jennifer B. Murtazashvili, the Founding Director of the Center for Governance and Markets and Associate Professor at the School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh, and Alexander Gabuev, Senior Fellow and the Chair of the Russia in the Asia-Pacific Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center. This panel is the second of the Carnegie Global Dialogue Series 2021-2022 and is also available to be watched online.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Live Recording Replay: Can China and India Get Back on Track?

    Live Recording Replay: Can China and India Get Back on Track?

    The China-India relationship remains strained as the year-and-a-half long standoff in eastern Ladakh continues. The border issue coupled with tensions over the COVID-19 outbreak pushed India to decouple from China, limiting Chinese investment in Indian tech companies and banning many of Beijing’s most successful mobile applications. At the same time, India has renewed its commitment to the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue, bolstered its defense partnerships with Australia and Japan, and become more active in Indian Ocean maritime security. Can the two countries find common ground despite lingering tensions? And what do deteriorating China-India relations mean for the United States’ approaches to the world’s two most populous countries?

    During a live recording of the China in the World podcast, Paul Haenle spoke with Han Hua, Director of the Center for Arms Control and Disarmament at Peking University's School of International Studies, and Darshana Baruah, associate fellow with the South Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. This panel is the first of the Carnegie Global Dialogue Series 2021-2022 and is also available to be watched online.

    • 59 min
    China’s Wolf Warrior Diplomacy with Peter Martin

    China’s Wolf Warrior Diplomacy with Peter Martin

    In this episode of the China in the World podcast, Paul Haenle speaks with Peter Martin about his new book, “China's Civilian Army: The Making of Wolf Warrior Diplomacy.” Peter Martin’s book charts the history of Chinese diplomacy, from the rise of the Communist Party during the Republican era to the end of 2020. Mr. Martin's research references hundreds of primary documents, including personal memoirs and diaries recorded by Chinese government officials. He explains that “Wolf Warrior” diplomacy, as it has come to be known, is nothing new, and that its roots lie in the internal incentive structure of the Chinese Foreign Ministry. Both public opinion and the directives of Party superiors combine to compel China’s diplomatic corps to be assertive players on the international stage.Mr. Peter Martin is a Defense Policy and Intelligence Reporter for Bloomberg News. Mr. Martin has written extensively about China and U.S.-China relations. His latest book is “China’s Civilian Army: The Making of Wolf Warrior Diplomacy,” published in June 2021 via Oxford University Press.

    • 43 min
    Kim Jong-un’s Strategy for Survival with David Shin

    Kim Jong-un’s Strategy for Survival with David Shin

    Leading a largely closed-off society and rarely engaging with foreign leaders, Kim Jong-un is one of the most misunderstood leaders in the world. Is Kim a rational actor? Does he have a long-term strategy for North Korea? What resources does Kim have at his disposal and how does he achieve his objectives? David Shin’s new book, Kim Jong-un's Strategy for Survival: A Method to Madness, provides answers to these questions and more. The book focuses on four cases that reveal North Korea’s survival strategy: the 2013 nuclear crisis, the 2015 landmine incident, the 2017 nuclear crisis, and the 2018 charm offensive. Dr. Shin argues that Kim Jong-un is far from a madman and, like the two Kims before him, has consistently been underestimated.  In this episode of the China in the World podcast, Paul Haenle speaks with David Shin, Associate Professor and Deputy Chair of the National Intelligence University (NIU), about his new book, Kim Jong-un's Strategy for Survival: A Method to Madness. The discussion covers Kim Jong-un’s strategy and tactics in 2017 and 2018, gauges the future of US-DPRK relations, and applies the book’s finding to assess the Biden administration’s early approach toward North Korea. 

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Live Recording Replay: How Will the EU Navigate U.S.-China Tensions?

    Live Recording Replay: How Will the EU Navigate U.S.-China Tensions?

    Over the past few years, Europe and the United States have each approached China’s rise differently. Washington has moved to reduce its economic reliance on Beijing while castigating its increasingly assertive global stance. Brussels, on the other hand, has tried to insulate its business ties with China from its concerns about Chinese policies and ambitions. Europe and China jointly proposed the Comprehensive Agreement on Investment (CAI), while German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emanuel Macron strived to keep the continent’s relations with Beijing on solid footing. Recently, however, it appears as though Europe has shifted course to align elements of its China strategy more closely with those of the United States. The CAI has been shelved, and France and Germany have announced plans to play a larger role in the South China Sea disputes. How will Europe manage its relationship with Beijing going forward? And how should Europe deal with worsening U.S.-China relations?

    During a live recording of the China in the World podcast, Paul Haenle spoke with Rosa Balfour, director of Carnegie Europe, and Cui Hongjian, director of the Department of European Studies at the China Institute of International Studies, on the trajectory of U.S.-EU-China relations. This panel is the fifth of the Carnegie Global Dialogue Series 2020-2021 and is also available to be watched online.

    • 59 min
    Live Recording Replay: What Lies Ahead for China in the Middle East

    Live Recording Replay: What Lies Ahead for China in the Middle East

    Conflict and instability in the Middle East show no signs of abating. Recent jousting between Israeli and Palestinian forces, the ongoing war in Yemen, and continued Saudi Arabia-Iran friction threaten to further destabilize the region. Though President Biden is attempting to restore coherence in the U.S. approach to the Middle East, his administration remains focused on responding to the pandemic domestically and on countering China in the international arena. Beijing, for its part, appears intent on playing a larger role in Middle Eastern affairs. It continues to foster stronger ties with regional countries through its Belt and Road Initiative and bilateral cooperation agreements, such as the twenty-five-year investment deal with Iran. How will China’s growing influence in the region affect the interests of the United States and other actors?

    During a live recording of the China in the World podcast, Paul Haenle spoke with Karim Sadjadpour, a senior fellow in the Carnegie Endowment’s Middle East Program, and He Wenping, a professor at the Institute of West Asian and African Studies at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. This panel is the fourth of the Carnegie Global Dialogue Series 2020-2021 and is also available to be watched online.

    • 1 hr 2 min

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