1 u. 18 min.

393 | August Live Q&A with Brendan Mahan, Will Curb, MJ Siemens, coaches Moira Maybin & Roxie Martin, & Barb McDonagh ADHD reWired

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** There's still room for YOU to join the 26th season of the award-winning ADHD reWired Coaching and Accountability Groups, starting in October!  Head over to to find out how you can be a part of these intensive, online and video-based coaching and accountability groups, so you can get your ADHD rewired and rewrite your ADHD story! [00:02:20]  - Eric has the first ADHD moment of the show  [00:04:38] - Question: A listener who was recently diagnosed with ADHD asks about hyperfocus, prioritizing, and how to tell the difference between something that is a “new” passion versus a hyperfocus, versus a new commitment that may lose interest in.  Learn as much as you can about ADHD. It’s a disorder where information makes a difference.  If you can anticipate the things in your environment that you’re more susceptible to falling into hyperfocus and plan for them. Our tendencies can be double-edged swords.  Ask ourselves: Is it a passion or calling, or something we’re just doing a deep dive on?  Have a place to store your ideas, because it doesn’t mean you have to act on them and continue to scroll. It’s okay to be curious about it, and observe if the curiosity will fade tomorrow before acting on it.  The more we are engaged in thinking about it (our ADHD), the more we are going to take our lives off auto pilot.  Is it a time-suck or a time-investment?  Learning about ADHD is really learning more about ourselves.  [00:14:33] - Question: What is the most frustrating thing about your ADHD? This listener’s most frustrating thing is having to wait for stuff. But first, Barb and Eric have a moment! Roxie:  working memory in almost every aspect of her life, and shares a working-memory moment.  Moira: day-to-day is waiting, but the big-impact ADHD frustration is impulsivity with blurting out.  Will: An extreme lack of executive function while recovering from COVID (at the time of this recording) and activating on the task at hand.  MJ: Impulsivity to never (or rarely) say “no”. Then optimism kicks in, then they realize they can’t do all the things, even though their ADHD wants to do all the things.  Brendan: The “waiting-brain” and having trouble initiating prior to something bigger in the future.  Eric: Transitioning or moving on to the next thing, and multi-tracking and maintenance in multiple domains of life at once.  [00:19:37] - Question: A listener is one month away from having a baby and is in serious need of working on their recently diagnosed ADHD, and wonders how to balance these.  Suggestions: Don’t join a coaching group (yet). Focus on your baby and get to know your baby because the years will fly by.  Learn more about ADHD by listening to podcasts, because you can listen to a podcast and feed a baby at the same time. The more passive the learning, the easier it’s going to be to fit in [the learning] around your baby.  When you’re pregnant, your body has a lot of estrogen which helps your ADHD. When you deliver, those hormones decrease. Women with ADHD have a much higher rate of postpartum depression largely due to this drop.  Figure out what works for you even when others want to give advice, ask for help, don’t be afraid to ask for help, and take care of yourself. [00:30:55] - Question: A listener, who is a startup cofounder, asks about navigating and managing rejection in a practical way, and avoiding participation with the anxiety of facing rejection.  It’s not just about competing with someone else, it’s about competing and challenging ourselves.  Is there risk? Yes. The only guarantee if a “no” is to not do the thing that scares us.  Ask ourselves: Can you do everything that you think you can do and at the same time, understand that it might not go your way, or seal your own fate by not doing anything?  Ask ourselves: What’s our mindset when we go into these things? Ask ourselves: Do we love what we’re doin

** There's still room for YOU to join the 26th season of the award-winning ADHD reWired Coaching and Accountability Groups, starting in October!  Head over to to find out how you can be a part of these intensive, online and video-based coaching and accountability groups, so you can get your ADHD rewired and rewrite your ADHD story! [00:02:20]  - Eric has the first ADHD moment of the show  [00:04:38] - Question: A listener who was recently diagnosed with ADHD asks about hyperfocus, prioritizing, and how to tell the difference between something that is a “new” passion versus a hyperfocus, versus a new commitment that may lose interest in.  Learn as much as you can about ADHD. It’s a disorder where information makes a difference.  If you can anticipate the things in your environment that you’re more susceptible to falling into hyperfocus and plan for them. Our tendencies can be double-edged swords.  Ask ourselves: Is it a passion or calling, or something we’re just doing a deep dive on?  Have a place to store your ideas, because it doesn’t mean you have to act on them and continue to scroll. It’s okay to be curious about it, and observe if the curiosity will fade tomorrow before acting on it.  The more we are engaged in thinking about it (our ADHD), the more we are going to take our lives off auto pilot.  Is it a time-suck or a time-investment?  Learning about ADHD is really learning more about ourselves.  [00:14:33] - Question: What is the most frustrating thing about your ADHD? This listener’s most frustrating thing is having to wait for stuff. But first, Barb and Eric have a moment! Roxie:  working memory in almost every aspect of her life, and shares a working-memory moment.  Moira: day-to-day is waiting, but the big-impact ADHD frustration is impulsivity with blurting out.  Will: An extreme lack of executive function while recovering from COVID (at the time of this recording) and activating on the task at hand.  MJ: Impulsivity to never (or rarely) say “no”. Then optimism kicks in, then they realize they can’t do all the things, even though their ADHD wants to do all the things.  Brendan: The “waiting-brain” and having trouble initiating prior to something bigger in the future.  Eric: Transitioning or moving on to the next thing, and multi-tracking and maintenance in multiple domains of life at once.  [00:19:37] - Question: A listener is one month away from having a baby and is in serious need of working on their recently diagnosed ADHD, and wonders how to balance these.  Suggestions: Don’t join a coaching group (yet). Focus on your baby and get to know your baby because the years will fly by.  Learn more about ADHD by listening to podcasts, because you can listen to a podcast and feed a baby at the same time. The more passive the learning, the easier it’s going to be to fit in [the learning] around your baby.  When you’re pregnant, your body has a lot of estrogen which helps your ADHD. When you deliver, those hormones decrease. Women with ADHD have a much higher rate of postpartum depression largely due to this drop.  Figure out what works for you even when others want to give advice, ask for help, don’t be afraid to ask for help, and take care of yourself. [00:30:55] - Question: A listener, who is a startup cofounder, asks about navigating and managing rejection in a practical way, and avoiding participation with the anxiety of facing rejection.  It’s not just about competing with someone else, it’s about competing and challenging ourselves.  Is there risk? Yes. The only guarantee if a “no” is to not do the thing that scares us.  Ask ourselves: Can you do everything that you think you can do and at the same time, understand that it might not go your way, or seal your own fate by not doing anything?  Ask ourselves: What’s our mindset when we go into these things? Ask ourselves: Do we love what we’re doin

1 u. 18 min.