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The Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies hosted a Symposium on April 3rd, 2009 honoring the centennial of the graduation of Aldo Leopold from the school and his acclaimed contributions to environmental conservation. Leopold became a leading and radical voice in American conservation, launching his land ethic in his celebrated book, “A Sand County Almanac.” The day-long symposium appraised the Leopold legacy, examined his relevance today, and explored how his land ethic might be reformulated for the global environmental and social challenges of the 21st century.

Aldo Leopold Yale University

    • Wetenschap

The Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies hosted a Symposium on April 3rd, 2009 honoring the centennial of the graduation of Aldo Leopold from the school and his acclaimed contributions to environmental conservation. Leopold became a leading and radical voice in American conservation, launching his land ethic in his celebrated book, “A Sand County Almanac.” The day-long symposium appraised the Leopold legacy, examined his relevance today, and explored how his land ethic might be reformulated for the global environmental and social challenges of the 21st century.

    Aldo Leopold Symposium, Round Table 1: Leopold's Place in American Environmental History

    Aldo Leopold Symposium, Round Table 1: Leopold's Place in American Environmental History

    Round Table 1: Leopold's Place in American Environmental History. Moderated by Paul Sabin, Assistant Professor of Environmental History, Yale University. Discussants: Susan Flader, Bill McKibben, Curt Meine, Jed Purdy and Julianne Warren.

    The Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies hosted a Symposium on April 3rd, 2009 honoring Aldo Leopold’s Graduation Centennial from the school and his acclaimed contributions to environmental conservation. Leopold became a leading and radical voice in American conservation, launching his land ethic in his celebrated A Sand County Almanac. The day-long symposium appraised Leopold’s legacy and examined how his land ethic might be reformulated for the global environmental and social challenges of the 21st century. This is Round Table I of the gathering, on Leopold’s place in American Environmental History. Gus Speth, retiring Dean, welcomed the participants. Paul Sabin, an Environmental Historian at Yale, moderated. The discussants were: University of Missouri Emerita History Professor Susan Flader; environmental writer and activist Bill McKibben; Leopold biographer and Center for Humans and Nature Director Curt Meine; Duke Law faculty Jed Purdy; and Leopold biographer and NYU faculty Julianne Warren.

    • 1 u. 30 min.
    Aldo Leopold Symposium, Round Table 2: Leopold's Legacy in Natural Resource Management

    Aldo Leopold Symposium, Round Table 2: Leopold's Legacy in Natural Resource Management

    Round Table 2: Leopold's Legacy in Natural Resource Management. Moderated by Oswald Schmitz, Professor of Population and Community Ecology, Yale FES. Discussants: Harry Bader, Michael Bean, Pat Leavenworth, Zygmunt Plater, and Courtney White.

    The Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies hosted a Symposium on April 3rd, 2009 honoring Aldo Leopold’s Graduation Centennial from the school and his acclaimed contributions to environmental conservation. Leopold became a leading and radical voice in American conservation, launching his land ethic in his celebrated book, A Sand County Almanac. The day-long symposium appraised Leopold’s legacy and examined how his land ethic might be reformulated for the global environmental and social challenges of the 21st century. This is Round Table II of the gathering, on Leopold’s legacy-actual and potential-in natural resource management. Gus Speth, retiring Dean, introduced the moderator, Os Schmitz, a Professor of Population and Community Ecology at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. The discussants were: Harry Bader, a private consultant and former federal lands manager; Michael Bean, a senior attorney with Environmental Defense; Pat Leavenworth, the State Conservationist for Wisconsin; Zygmunt Plater, Professor of Law at Boston College School of Law; and Courtney White, Executive Director of the Quivira Coalition in New Mexico.

    • 1 u. 20 min.
    Aldo Leopold Symposium Family Interlude: Conversation with Aldo Leopold's daughter and Great Granddaughter

    Aldo Leopold Symposium Family Interlude: Conversation with Aldo Leopold's daughter and Great Granddaughter

    Growing Up Under Leopold's Influence: family remniscences and reflections about instilling a love for and connection with nature and the land by his daughter Estella Leopold and his great granddaughter Clare Kazanski.

    The Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies hosted a Symposium on April 3rd, 2009 honoring the centennial of the graduation of Aldo Leopold from the school and his acclaimed contributions to environmental conservation. Leopold became a leading and radical voice in American conservation, launching his land ethic in his celebrated book, “A Sand County Almanac.” The day-long symposium appraised the Leopold legacy, examined his relevance today and explored how his land ethic might be reformulated for the global environmental and social challenges of the 21st century. This is a recording of the conversation over lunch with Leopold’s youngest daughter Estella, and his great granddaughter, Clare Kazanski. The conversation was a reminiscence of family life at “the shack,” the abandoned farm in the Wisconsin prairie Leopold bought and restored in the 1930s and forties, and his continuing influence on his progeny today. Gene Likens, an ecologist and founding director of the Institute for Ecosystem Studies, introduced Estella and Clare. Estella is Professor Emeritus, Department of Biology, University of Washington. Clare Kazanski is a Program Associate of the National Climate Campaign at the Environmental Defense Fund.

    • 45 min.
    Aldo Leopold Symposium, Round Table 3: Leopoldian Philosophy and Ethics: In and Beyond the Academy

    Aldo Leopold Symposium, Round Table 3: Leopoldian Philosophy and Ethics: In and Beyond the Academy

    Leopoldian Philosophy and Ethics. A Round Table discussion with Q and A moderated by Stephen Kellert, Professor of Social Ecology at Yale FES. Discussants: Peter Brown, Baird Callicott, John Grim, Dale Jamieson and Sylvia Hood Washington.

    The Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies hosted a Symposium on April 3rd, 2009 honoring the centennial of the graduation of Aldo Leopold from the school and his acclaimed contributions to environmental conservation. Leopold became a leading and radical voice in American conservation, launching his land ethic in his celebrated book, “A Sand County Almanac.” The day-long symposium appraised the Leopold legacy, examined his relevance today, and explored how his land ethic might be reformulated for the global environmental and social challenges of the 21st century. This is a recording of Round Table 3: Leopoldian Philosophy and Ethics: In and Beyond the Academy. Gus Speth, retiring Dean of the school, introduced the moderator, Stephen Kellert, Tweedy/Ordway Professor of Social Ecology at Yale FES. The Round Table then proceeded to brief presentations by: Peter Brown, a Professor of Environmental Studies at McGill University; Baird Callicott, Regents Professor of Philosophy and Religion Studies, Department of Philosophy and Religion Studies, University of North Texas; John Grim, Senior Lecturer and Research Scholar at Yale University in the area of religion and ecology; Dale Jamieson, a philosopher and Director of Environmental Studies at New York University; Gene Likens, an ecologist and founding director of the Institute for Ecosystem Studies; and Sylvia Hood Washington, Research Associate Professor, University of Illinois, Chicago. The formal remarks were followed by a Q and A session.

    • 1 u. 9 min.
    Aldo Leopold Symposium Final Plenary: Leopold for the 21st Century

    Aldo Leopold Symposium Final Plenary: Leopold for the 21st Century

    Leopold for the 21st Century: What Would He Say to the Yale FES Class of 2009? Moderated by Mary Evelyn Tucker. Discussion by Sally Collins, Clive Hamilton, Wes Jackson, Bruce Jennings, Gene Likens and Melina Shannon DiPietro.

    The Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies hosted a Symposium on April 3rd, 2009 honoring the centennial of the graduation of Aldo Leopold from the school and his acclaimed contributions to environmental conservation. Leopold became a leading and radical voice in American conservation, launching his land ethic in his celebrated book, “A Sand County Almanac.” The day-long symposium appraised the Leopold legacy, examined his relevance today, and explored how his land ethic might be reformulated for the global environmental and social challenges of the 21st century. This is a recording of the final plenary: Leopold for the 21st Century: What Would He Say to the Yale FES Class of 2009? The discussion was moderated by Mary Evelyn Tucker, Senior Lecturer and Research Scholar at Yale and Co-Founder of the Forum on Religion and Ecology. Discussants were: Sally Collins, Director of Office of Ecosystem Services & Markets, U.S. Department of Agriculture; Clive Hamilton, author of “Growth Fetish” and co-author of “Affluenza,” and Charles Sturt Professor of Public Ethics, Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics, Canberra, Australia; Wes Jackson, the Founder and President of the Land Institute and a MacArthur fellowship recipient; Bruce Jennings, Director of the Center for Humans and Nature in New York; Gene Likens, an ecologist and Founding Director and President Emeritus of the Institute of Ecosystem Studies; and Melina Shannon-DiPietro, Director of the Yale Sustainable Food Project.

    • 1 u. 19 min.

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