49 afleveringen

Astronomy 161, Introduction to the Solar System, is the first quarter of
a 2-quarter introductory Astronomy for non-science majors taught at The
Ohio State University. This podcast presents audio recordings of
Professor Richard Pogge's lectures from his Autumn Quarter 2007 class.
All of the lectures were recorded live in 1000 McPherson Laboratory on
the OSU Main Campus in Columbus, Ohio.

Astronomy 161 - Introduction to Solar System Astronomy - Autumn 2007 Richard Pogge

    • Cursussen

Astronomy 161, Introduction to the Solar System, is the first quarter of
a 2-quarter introductory Astronomy for non-science majors taught at The
Ohio State University. This podcast presents audio recordings of
Professor Richard Pogge's lectures from his Autumn Quarter 2007 class.
All of the lectures were recorded live in 1000 McPherson Laboratory on
the OSU Main Campus in Columbus, Ohio.

    Astronomy 141 Podcast Teaser

    Astronomy 141 Podcast Teaser

    A new podcast, Astronomy 141, Life in the Universe, is available
    for those interested in continuing an exploration of topics in
    modern astronomy.

    Lecture 46: Are We Alone? Life in the Universe

    Lecture 46: Are We Alone? Life in the Universe

    Are we alone in the Universe? This lecture explores the question of how
    we might go about finding life on planets around other stars. Rather
    than talking about speculative ideas, like the Drake Equation or SETI, I
    am instead taking the approach of posing it as a problem of what to look
    for among the exoplanets we have been discovering in huge numbers in the
    last decade. I describe the basic requirements for life, and
    how life on Earth is surprisingly tough (extremophiles). I then give a
    definition of the Habitable Zone around a star, and present the
    Goldilocks Problem of how a planet must be neither too hot, too cold
    (for liquid water) or too big or too small to be hospitable to
    life. From there I then review the problem of how to go about finding
    Earth-like planets (Pale Blue Dots) around other stars, and if we do
    find them, what spectroscopic signatures of life, called biomarkers, we
    can look for to see if they have some form of life like we understand it
    on them. Recorded on 2007 Nov 30 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus
    campus of The Ohio State University. This is the final lecture for
    Autumn Quarter 2007.

    Lecture 45: Exoplanets - Planets Around Other Stars

    Lecture 45: Exoplanets - Planets Around Other Stars

    Are there planets around other stars? Are there Earth-like planets
    around other stars? Do any of those harbor life? Intelligent life?
    We'd like to know the answers to all of these questions, and in recent
    years we've made great progress towards at least answering the first.
    To date, more than 260 planets have been found around more than 200
    other stars, most in the interstellar neighborhood of the Sun, but a few
    at great distance. This lecture reviews the search for ExoPlanets,
    discussing the successful Radial Velocity, Transit, and Microlensing
    techniques. What we have found so far are very suprising systems,
    especially Jupiter-size or bigger planets orbiting very close (few
    hundredths of an AU) from their parent stars. Recorded 2007 Nov 29 in
    1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

    Lecture 44: Comets

    Lecture 44: Comets

    Comets are chance visitors from the icy reaches of the outer Solar
    System. In this lecture I describe the properties of comets, their
    historical importance, and introduce the "dirty snowball" model of a
    comet nucleus. At the end of class I created a model of a comet nucleus
    from common household and office materials, unfortunately I could not
    arrange for a videographer in time. Recorded 2007 Nov 28 in 1000
    McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

    Lecture 43: Icy Worlds of the Outer Solar System

    Lecture 43: Icy Worlds of the Outer Solar System

    Beyond the orbit of Neptune lies the realm of the icy worlds, ranging in
    size from Neptune's giant moon Triton and the dwarf planets Pluto and
    Eris, all the way down to the nuclei of comets a few kilometers across.
    This lecture discussed the icy bodies of the Trans-Neptunian regions of
    the Solar System, discussing the basic properties of Triton (the best
    studied such object), Pluto, Eris, and the Kuiper Belt, introducing the
    dynamical families of Trans-Neptunian Objects that record in their
    orbits the slow migration of Neptune outwards during the early history
    of the Solar System. The Kuiper Belt is the icy analog of the main
    Asteroid Belt of the inner Solar System: both are shaped by their
    gravitational interaction with giant gas planets (Jupiter for the
    asteroids, Neptune for the KBOs), and are composed of leftover raw
    materials from the formation of their respective regions of the Solar
    System. Recorded 2007 Nov 27 in 1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus
    campus of The Ohio State University.

    Lecture 42: Asteroids

    Lecture 42: Asteroids

    Asteroids are the leftover rocky materials from the formation of the
    Solar System that reside primarily in a broad belt between the orbits of
    Mars and Jupiter. This lecture reviews the physical and orbital
    properties of Asteroids, and discusses the role of Jupiter and orbital
    resonances in dynamically sculpting the Main Belt of Asteroids. Once
    again, we see how the history of the dynamical evolution of our Solar
    System is written in the orbits of its members. Recorded 2007 Nov 26 in
    1000 McPherson Lab on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

Top-podcasts in Cursussen

Luisteraars hebben zich ook geabonneerd op