10 afleveringen

A podcast on Content Strategy and User Experience. With guests, interviews, cases and more. Stay tuned!

Efficiently Effective Saskia Videler

    • Technologie

A podcast on Content Strategy and User Experience. With guests, interviews, cases and more. Stay tuned!

    Party of one - On being a solo content strategist

    Party of one - On being a solo content strategist

    Find the blogpost and links to all sites at EfficientlyEffective.fm.

    • 43 min.
    Do you really need a content style guide?

    Do you really need a content style guide?

    Content style guides and voice and tone definitions have been a strong asset in content strategists' toolkits for years. They are vital to align stakeholders on content. But Jason Fox believes many content style guides are flawed, just like the principle of the content style guide.









    We talk with Jason Fox, a UX writer based in Denver, about his grievances with content style guides, and voice and tone definitions in particular and come up with tactics to improve the concept and the implementation. LinksJason's Medium postMailchimp's style guideTranscriptOne of the staples of content strategy is the content style guide. In it, we define the consistent voice of the organisation and the tone we should take in specific situations. They also define how to use different types of content, how elaborate or concise we can be with words and perhaps point out some specific grammar or vocabulary use. We need style guides to align stakeholders on content.I think it’s fair to say that the most famous content styleguide is the one from MailChimp. The online documentation covers guidelines, from how to use alt text to how to write legal copy.The document is beautiful and makes a lot of sense. But it’s also, huge. You can find it on styleguide.mailchimp.com. I’ll also put a link in the shownotes, which can be found on efficientlyeffective.fm.And then, I came across a Medium post by Jason Fox. According to him, voice and tone guides are overrated, a waste of money, useless. Wow!With the examples he references in his post, I do get where he’s coming from. Let me name a few. In content style guides, writers are being told to ‘Have fun’, ‘be authentic’ and ‘be badass baby’. Well yeah, that does feel a bit weird. He also quotes styleguides that propose you ‘Avoid jargon, trendy constructions and buzzwords’ - these pointers are basic knowledge, according to Fox.I was intrigued, perhaps even startled, and I had questions. So here we are, Jason Fox! Please tell us who you are, and maybe also: who do you think you are for writing this?Jason Fox: “Who do I think I am and who am I... Thank you so much for having me, I am a writer based in Denver, Colorado. I have a lot of experience working in the marketing and advertising world and also in the last several years I've had the opportunity to help write words for software.I think that having that experience in the marketing world and in the product world maybe informed the feelings that I had toward voice and tone style guides. Really that article that I wrote I think ... I don't blame you, I guess, for being startled by the article when I was writing it. I was like, "Do I really want to write this? Is this going to be something that's going to stick with me, that I'll have to have conversations with-"”Saskia: “Yes you do.”Jason: “Yes I do. It's one of the first. I've imagined how I would have this conversation with potential clients. They're like, "We read this article where you said that we don't need a voice and tone style guide and that doesn't seem to make much sense."So I don't know if it's maybe doing more harm than good for my career but where I was coming from with that piece is that to go all the way back when I graduated college in 2010 with a degree in writing I thought, "Okay great. Who's going to hire me and what am I going to write?"I didn't necessarily have any ambitions of going into journalism or into even marketing or advertising. I just went out into the world with the ability to write and wanted to see who needed me to write for them. I realized over time that a lot of the projects that you got involved in early on as a writer are those projects where you can convince people that you are able to sound like a subject matter expert." Or that you are able to provide them with a partic

    • 34 min.
    The secret to gov.uk's near perfect UX: Content Design

    The secret to gov.uk's near perfect UX: Content Design

    A conversation with Sarah RichardsGov.uk is perhaps the most prolific website of the last 10 years. It stands out because of its simplicity and timelessness. Its no-frills design and content didn't come easy. Just try and strip down thousands of pages of content to the very core, leaving only what's necessary to help its visitors to get the information they need, and to complete their goal. All the while dealing with many different stakeholders (and their politics). But that's exactly what Sarah Richards did. 









    Sarah Richards











    What should it look like, that bit of information that people in a particular situation, really need? Sarah Richards and her content and design team at GDS (Government Digital Services in the UK) asked that question, hundreds, perhaps thousands of times, for just as many situations and pieces of content. They found most of their answers by going after and using the data that was available to them, and by creating user stories and job stories (a practice also used in software development), where you create a little story to tune into the particular need you would need the content for. It creates space for different forms and formats of content, by not assuming that the solution would for instance be a web-text, per se. It could be an image, a flowchart, a video, a map, a calculator, or something completely other than that. Sarah named their practice 'Content Design'.









    My own, battered and dog eared copy of the book











    In her book, also titled 'Content Design', she shares its core approach and tactics. I really enjoyed reading Sarah's book and attending her workshop on content design. I learned a lot of new skills that I have already put in practice in a few of my projects. I'm sure those skills can be helpful for you, as well. So, have a listen to this episode and our conversation. You'll hear what it was like to work on gov.uk during the first few years (spoiler alert: it was not completely void of stressful situations), how Sarah and her team implemented their methods and what content design entails. Please note:Unfortunately, I have been very clumsy with the recordings, so this episode's sound quality is way below the standard I set for myself, and I'm so so sorry about that. Podcasting is very humbling in that way: I'm constantly reminded of how much I still have to learn...



    Links:Gov.ukContent Design LondonSarah's book: Content DesignSarah's colleague Tom Loosemore

    • 34 min.
    How cognitive bias impacts our work

    How cognitive bias impacts our work

    You're smart. You have an amazing, efficient brain. But in its efficiency, your brain takes shortcuts. These shortcuts are based on cognitive bias. Cognitive bias helps you make quick decisions: what can you eat and what might kill you? Should you run from this animal or hunt it? It helped us to survive in the wild and pass on our genes. But even when you don't have to deal with these kinds of danger, you are still hard-wired to survive. It impacts how you think, buy, do, make, socialize, talk, ... It impacts the decisions you make in your live and in our work. And you should be aware of that.In this episode you'll hear from David Dylan Thomas, who creates the Cognitive Bias Podcast. And from Sara Wachter-Boettcher, who is a content strategist with a strong focus on the impact of cognitive bias on our work. 




























    Sara Wachter-Boettcher





















    David Dylan Thomas






















    Links:The Cognitive Bias PodcastThe Wikipedia list of all cognitive biasesHidden Brain podcastSara and Eric Meyer's book Design for Real LifeSara's upcoming book Technically Wrong: Sexist Apps, Biased Algorithms, and Other Threats of Toxic TechSara's Talk at Design & Content Conference 2016 (too important not to watch!):

    • 40 min.
    Bridging the gap between SEO, UX & Content Strategy, with Jess Hutton

    Bridging the gap between SEO, UX & Content Strategy, with Jess Hutton

    Have you hugged an SEO professional today?Search Engine Optimization (SEO), content strategy and UX have similar goals: to help people find what they need and complete their task. But it hasn't always been like that with SEO. Things have changed, though. It's about time we build some bridges. Jess Hutton works at Clearlink as a UX specialist. She works closely together with the SEO-professionals on her team and can account for multiple events that SEO helped her to do her job better. She shares her experiences in this podcast. Also, you'll learn a bit about how SEO-experts tick, and how you can help them. If you don't have a dedicated SEO-guru on your team, and you find yourself in need of some SEO related insights, Jess has some tips & tricks for you, too. After listening to this podcast, you will want to run to your SEO co-workers, and have coffee and cake with them, we promise!



    Note: the audiofile may take about 30 seconds to load.You can also find this episode and subscribe to the podcast in your favorite podcast app.









    Jess Hutton, picture by Scott Anderson











    Are you an SEO professional? We would love to hear from you! Tell us what you think of the episode, about your experiences. Maybe we've missed something and you have some extra tips? Tweet at us, email us, leave a comment under this blogpost or use the form here on the website!Not an SEO expert? Not to worry, your comments, ideas and feedback are just as welcome. Tweet, email or fill in the form!Links:MOZ - Great resource for SEO updatesDr. Pete Meyers on Twitter - Marketing Scientist at MOZBloomberry - Advanced forum searchingScreaming Frog SEO Spider - Crawls and analyses the SEO of websitesQuora - Q&A forum

    • 40 min.
    GDPR Part 2 - Impact on content and UX

    GDPR Part 2 - Impact on content and UX

    Part 2 in the GDPR mini series: implementing GDPR in your work
    Last month we talked about the basics of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). In this episode we focus on the specific impact on content strategy and UX.
    Because the GDPR will change the web, but also our work. Not only how we process personal data, but also how we ask for it will change. People need to be able to view, edit and delete their data. And then there are our research practices. Even those are impacted by the GDPR.
    If you are 'new' to all things GDPR, please listen to episode 1 first. Episode 2 will make much more sense that way. 
    Also check out the accompanying blogpost to episode 1 for links to the full GDPR text, some helpful info sources and an overview of the basic principles of GDPR.
    Note: the audiofile may take about 30 seconds to load.You can also find this episode and subscribe to the podcast in your favorite podcast app.
    Overview of the steps to take

    Check with your company where you stand with GDPR compliancy, find the taskforce, let them know you are here to help.


    Dig up your privacy policy and test it for transparency. Make it more readable, understandable, better.


    Map out the data streams like user journeys. What does it mean for communication through your design and content?


    Check whether the tools you use for testing are GDPR compliant. If necessary, find new ones.


    Design a beautiful flow for the user to view, edit or retract their data.


    Join the conversation - here, at meetups, conferences, on Twitter, the content & UX Slack - and share your findings, cases and best practices. 

    Meet our 5 experts

    Bart Van den Brande - Sirius Legal
    Bart Van den Brande is a lawyer at Sirius Legal. He specialises in GDPR and helps his clients in complying to the GDPR.

    Clovis Six - Internet Architects
    In his UX research and UX design work at Internet Architects, Clovis already encountered some GDPR related issues. In this episode he provides a comprehensive overview of how to implement good GDPR practices in your work. 

    Katryna Dow - Meeco
    Katryna Dow is the founder and CEO of Meeco: a platform that enables people to share the information they want to share with organisations they trust, in order to get better, more personalised service and relevant offers.

    Aral Balkan - Ind.ie
    Aral Balkan is an amazing public speaker, a cyborg rights activist, co-founder of ethical software company Ind.ie and part of the DiEM initiative. He has a strong opinion on privacy as a human right. 

    Copy of Copy of Seppe Van Steelant - City of Ghent
    As the Data Protection Officer (DPO) at the City of Ghent, Seppe Van Steelant plays a vital role in the transition of gent.be and mijngent.be into GDPR compliant platforms.

    • 33 min.

Top-podcasts in Technologie

Luisteraars hebben zich ook geabonneerd op