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The incredible journey of the world’s most influential swamp and those who call it home. Beginning at the end of the last ice age and trekking all the way through to the modern era, together we step through the centuries and meet some of the cast of characters who fashioned and forged a boggy marshland into a vibrant mercantile society and then further into a sea-trotting global super-power before becoming the centre for modern day liberalism.

History of the Netherlands Republic of Amsterdam Radio

    • Geschiedenis
    • 4.7, 53 beoordelingen

The incredible journey of the world’s most influential swamp and those who call it home. Beginning at the end of the last ice age and trekking all the way through to the modern era, together we step through the centuries and meet some of the cast of characters who fashioned and forged a boggy marshland into a vibrant mercantile society and then further into a sea-trotting global super-power before becoming the centre for modern day liberalism.

    BONUS: A Pint-Sized History of Beer and Brewing in the Low Countries

    BONUS: A Pint-Sized History of Beer and Brewing in the Low Countries

    Why did the Dutch drink almost four times as much beer in the fifteenth century as they do today? Why would the Beer Drinking War be a better name for The Eighty Years' War? And why is the longest-standing beer in Belgium not as old as the brewers want us to believe? Pour a glass of your favourite brew and join on a historic journey of beer and brewing in the Low Countries. Proost!
    Do you want to know more about Flemish and Dutch history and culture? Visit www.the-low-countries.com.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 57 min.
    28 - The Strained Reins of a Waning Reign

    28 - The Strained Reins of a Waning Reign

    In the final decade of his reign, Philip the Good was obsessed with the idea of a crusade against the Ottoman Turks. The complexities of the diverse state that he had built, however, would never allow him to fulfill this dream, as he would continually be distracted by local issues. Although Philip had been released from his personal vassalage to the French King, France still remained a threat to stability in Burgundy; the two men’s status as ‘frenemies’ was solidified when Charles VII’s son, the dauphin Louis, was given refuge at the Burgundian court. Philip’s heir, Charles, Count of Charolais, had major father issues of his own after their argument which had ended with Philip lost in the forest in Belgium. Despite the birth of his daughter, Mary, Charles became estranged from not only his father, but also the fine-workings of central governance. He retreated to Holland to worry about whether he would ever, indeed, actually receive his inheritance. When the dauphin Louis ascended to the throne in France, a sequence of events was set in motion which threatened to permanently splinter the Burgundian realm. But before this could happen, the Estates of the Burgundian Netherlands took the small step of organising a meeting on their own accord in order to secure Charles’s inheritance and force a reconciliation between the aging and deteriorating duke and his ambitious and aggressive son. And in so doing, the Estates General of the Netherlands had taken one giant leap onto centre stage of lowlander politics.
    With thanks to Jos van Ommeren, Zoe Tsiagkouris and Paul Roos for their Patreon support.
    SHOW NOTES: www.republicofamsterdamradio.com/episodes/historyofthenetherlands/episode-28-the-strained-reins-of-a-waning-reign
    PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/historyofthenetherlands
    TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/historyofNL
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    • 45 min.
    27 - Picking Bishops and Familial Fissures

    27 - Picking Bishops and Familial Fissures

    When Philip the good went to the Imperial Diet in Regensburg in 1454 it gave his son and heir, Charles, the count of Charolais, a chance to get some practice at ruling in his stead, giving subjects in the Burgundian Low Countries a glimpse into what the future of the dynasty might hold. When Philip returned he was obsessed with the idea of crusade, meaning both Charles and Isabella of Portugal remained involved in major political actions. However, as always, events in the Low Countries soon demanded Philip’s attention again, as he would execute plans to expand the Burgundian influence over the spiritual as well as temporal realms in his domains. He would force one of his many illegitimate children, David, onto the bishopric throne in Utrecht in 1455 and the year after that another Burgundian puppet into the same role in the ever-troublesome bishopric of Liege. As Philip was busy dealing with these various issues, however, a power struggle broke out within his inner circle that would see the Croy family begin making plans to take down Philip’s longtime right hand man, his chancellor Nicolas Rolin. To further complicate matters, in 1455 a bombshell would drop when the heir to the French throne, the dauphin Louis, would flee the issues he had with his own father, the King of France, and sensationally seek and receive exile at the Burgundian court. A generational shift was taking place and, faced with all these new contenders for his father’s honour and affection, Charles would feel threatened and the relationship between the Burgundian father and son would sour. By the time he was just 23 years old, the two men would no longer be on speaking terms and Charles would be removed from the political process altogether. The Burgundian dynasty, as strong as it looked from the outside, was looking very frail from within.

    With thanks to Ron Shokker, Gerco Broekstra, Ken Heugel, Oisín O Mahony, Tatiana Magdaleno and polypat for their Patreon support.

    To book a tour on the Amsterdam canals with us, go to www.tdbg.nl and make sure you include "I believe in Dave" in the subject line!

    SHOW NOTES: www.republicofamsterdamradio.com/episodes/historyofthenetherlands/episode-26-beautiful-burgundian-bureaucracy
    PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/historyofthenetherlands
    TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/historyofNL
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 57 min.
    26 - Beautiful Burgundian Bureaucracy and the Salty Citizens of Ghent

    26 - Beautiful Burgundian Bureaucracy and the Salty Citizens of Ghent

    Philip the Good may have dreamed of wearing a single crown, but while that was not the case he was just a man wearing many different hats, and if you’ve ever seen someone wearing more than one hat at a time, you’d know how difficult and awkward that can be. Philip brought in administrative and economic changes to try and fuse the many different bureaucracies of his lands into one. This led to early meetings between representatives from all of Philip’s lowland domains which signify the emergence of an early parliamentary body, the Estates General, which will play a major role in the Low Countries in the years to come. However, although Philip was somewhat flexible when it came to handling his various provinces, it cost him a fortune to do so. This was most risky in his wealthiest territory, Flanders and the stability he had sought since the Bruges revolt was shattered when Ghent, his largest city, took its turn to go into open and violent revolt. Once more Philip would have to temporarily abandon his role as loving and fatherly prince, put on his hat of vengeful lord and once more crush thousands of his subjects. He would then make another Joyous Entry, exactly as he had fifteen year prior in Bruges and force the subdued people of Ghent to recognise his headpiece of haughty, honourable homage; the loving, benevolent prince, once more. 

    With thanks to Keith Brown and David Gould for their Patreon support.
    SHOW NOTES: www.republicofamsterdamradio.com/episodes/historyofthenetherlands/episode-26-beautiful-burgundian-bureaucracy
    PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/historyofthenetherlands
    TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/historyofNL
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 56 min.
    25 - Pheasant Fealty (Stuck in the Middle mit Vous)

    25 - Pheasant Fealty (Stuck in the Middle mit Vous)

    After the Treaty of Arras in 1435, Philip the Good’s international policies had to overcome several hurdles if he was to achieve his aim of obtaining as much territory and autonomy as he could. Despite his reconciliation with the king of France, the two cousins would continually be at each other’s throats and on the brink of breaking into warfare again. In 1441 Philip became the regent for Luxembourg and this irked the dignity of certain powerbrokers in the Holy Roman Empire who had their own eyes on the domain. Because Philip was a French prince who ruled imperial territories, he had to rely on his usual tactics of over the top extravagance and relationship building to navigate through the political awkwardness that this caused. He successfully made moves designed to maintain his autonomy as a prince of Christendom and from the 1440s harboured the idea of elevation to a kingship. This would come close to materialising several times, however, as has been the way since Charlemagne’s empire was split up between three brothers all those centuries ago, Philip found that being stuck between France and the German Empire left little room for absolute low country autonomy.


    With thanks to Demetrio Munoz, Leonieke Aalders, and Iosa Mac Chrisdein for their Patreon support.
    SHOW NOTES: www.republicofamsterdamradio.com/episodes/historyofthenetherlands/episode-25-pheasant-fealty
    PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/historyofthenetherlands
    TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/historyofNL
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 58 min.
    BONUS: Jan van Eyck: The Man and the Myth

    BONUS: Jan van Eyck: The Man and the Myth

    Jan van Eyck, one of the Low Countries' most famous artists, lived through an extraordinary period in history, between the 1390s and the 1440s. Although much about the early Netherlandish painter’s life is completely unknown, the details which do remain provide tantalising glimpses into an artistic and technical talent, who was both socially and politically capable enough to be able to ingratiate himself within the highest ranks of power in his time. Van Eyck’s cultural influence has continued in the five and a half centuries since his death. In Flanders, the year 2020 is being celebrated as the Year of Van Eyck. So to pay homage, in this episode we will explore the life and works of Jan van Eyck and the mystery surrounding the theft of part of his most famous work, the Ghent altarpiece.
    Visit www.the-low-countries.com for the high road to Dutch/Flemish culture!
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 41 min.

Klantrecensies

4.7 van 5
53 beoordelingen

53 beoordelingen

Durch sea captain ,

Well researched, humorous, and a sheer pleasure to listen

A must hear, if you have only the slightest interest in history. Looking forward to every new episode.

Orange and Green/Yellow ,

History of the Netherlands is an amazing podcast

I am very happy to have found this podcast. I am Dutch and enjoyed history in school, but there are very few Dutch popular sources to learn more about our history. The presenter is perfect for me, since I am half Australian.

Tochwel ,

Great stuff

As a Dutch republican who loves history, in my completely unbiased opinion, this is the best podcast ever. Loving it!

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