22 afleveringen

The Middle East History Lecture Series is a graduate student organized forum promoting the exchange of ideas between graduate students working on various aspects of Middle Eastern history and experienced faculty members at universities around the country. This forum provides an opportunity for the student organizers to workshop with visiting faculty regarding their research (both in terms of topics as well as experiences, methodologies, etc.) and experience as academics. The culmination of each visit is a lecture by the visiting faculty member in which they present their research to an audience of historically-minded academics and students specializing in the Middle East as well as interested scholars from the campus and community. This collection also incorporates lectures from the Social Sciences and the Middle East lecture series on historic topics.

Middle East History Lecture Series The University of Texas at Austin

    • Geschiedenis

The Middle East History Lecture Series is a graduate student organized forum promoting the exchange of ideas between graduate students working on various aspects of Middle Eastern history and experienced faculty members at universities around the country. This forum provides an opportunity for the student organizers to workshop with visiting faculty regarding their research (both in terms of topics as well as experiences, methodologies, etc.) and experience as academics. The culmination of each visit is a lecture by the visiting faculty member in which they present their research to an audience of historically-minded academics and students specializing in the Middle East as well as interested scholars from the campus and community. This collection also incorporates lectures from the Social Sciences and the Middle East lecture series on historic topics.

    Turkey's Role in Shaping the New Middle East

    Turkey's Role in Shaping the New Middle East

    With the rise of the Arab Spring of 2011, Turkey has been identified by many analysts and activities within and outside of the Middle East as a potential model for post-revolutionary states. Turkey's position as a mediator between the west and the Islamic world appears to be more critical than at any point in recent history. Join us for a forum and discussion with prominent Turkish journalist Abdülhamit Bilici about Turkey's role in shaping the future of the Middle East. Abdülhamit Bilici is General Manager of Cihan News Agency and columnist of both Zaman and Today's Zaman newspapers. He served as the Deputy Editor in Chief of Zaman daily, the largest circulated paper in Turkey. He also worked as the foreign news editor of Zaman and Aksiyon weekly news magazine. As a student of International Relations, Mr. Bilici writes mainly on Turkish foreign policy and world politics. He contributes to other papers on Turkish politics and appears on national and international TV programs to comment on political developments in Turkey.

    • 1 u. 23 min.
    Rethinking the Arab Uprisings One Year Later

    Rethinking the Arab Uprisings One Year Later

    Beginning in December 2010, the suicide of a Tunisian street vender ignited protests and uprisings that spread throughout the Arab world. James L. Gelvin, Professor of History at UCLA and author of The Arab Uprisings: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford University Press, 2012), looks back at the first year of those protests and uprisings, exploring their causes, their trajectories, and the lessons we might learn from them.

    • 37 min.
    Local Texts: Shari'a in Mid-Century Yemen

    Local Texts: Shari'a in Mid-Century Yemen

    Clifford Geertz famously described law as a form of “local knowledge.” In this lecture Prof. Messick examines the Islamic Shari'a as it was manifested in a system of local texts. He refers to a corpus of written work produced by a particular community of Muslim jurists and practitioners. Yemen, mountainous and agrarian, provides the setting; the Zaydis, rooted there for over a thousand years, the juridical community. Although his research in highland Yemen has spanned the last several decades, the readings he discusses focus upon a slightly earlier point in time--the first half of the twentieth century. Prof. Messick concentrates on this recent historical period to study a formation of Shari'a texts in the era of a classically styled Islamic polity.

    • 59 min.
    Double, Triple Entrapment: The Harki Story

    Double, Triple Entrapment: The Harki Story

    Prof. Crapanzano's paper is concerned with the role of narrative and silence in the passage of a wound – a trauma – from generation to generation. Specifically he looks at the way parental – in case in point, paternal – silence perpetuates the wound in children. Set stories, which inevitably lack particularity, seem incapable of “filling” that silence, fulfilling the children’s quest to know. They subsume what particulars are known in a generalized narrative that, repeated over and over again, loses vitality. Frozen, it intensifies the wound…. Prof. Crapanzano discusses this dynamic in terms of the Harkis – those Algerians who fought alongside the French, as auxiliary troops, during Algeria’s War of Independence. Between seventy and one hundred fifty thousand were slaughtered at the war’s end by the Algerian population at large. Those who managed to escape to France were incarcerated in camps and forestry hamlets, some for over sixteen years.

    • 56 min.
    On Sponges and Lost Love: Three Poems and a Few Comments on Arab-Jewish History in Iraq

    On Sponges and Lost Love: Three Poems and a Few Comments on Arab-Jewish History in Iraq

    In the years 1921–1951, the Iraqi Jewish community thrived. Numbering around 150,000, this primarily urban community figured prominently in Iraq’s culture, literature and economy. Bashkin raises a few questions relating to the meanings of the Jewish sense of belonging to the Iraqi community through a reading of three poems written by Iraqi Jews. In doing so, I explore the ways in which Iraqi Jews wrote about modernity and secularism, and the manners in which their texts shed light on sociocultural processes occurring in Iraq at the time.

    • 55 min.
    Shah-Rah or the King’s Road: Reinterpreting the European travel writings of Nasir al-Din Shah Qajar

    Shah-Rah or the King’s Road: Reinterpreting the European travel writings of Nasir al-Din Shah Qajar

    Nasir al-Din Shah (r. 1848-1896), the longest reigning Qajar monarch traveled to Europe three times during his rule. While he was not the first monarch from the region to travel to Europe, he was the first to record each travel extensively in daily diaries that were made public shortly after. Until recently, these travelogues were dismissed by scholars for focusing on frivolous and repetitive information. This talk presents a new interpretation of Nasir al-Din Shah's extensive travel writing by placing them in their own cultural and political milieu, and by focusing on the question of why the king would choose to so meticulously record his travels.
    Naghmeh Sohrabi is the Charles (Corky) Goodman Professor of Middle East History and the Associate Director for Research at the Crown Center for Middle East Studies at Brandeis. Professor Sohrabi received her Ph.D. in History and Middle East Studies from Harvard University in 2005, and was a post-doctoral fellow at the Crown Center from 2005-2007. Her book, Taken for Wonder: Nineteenth Century Travel Accounts from Iran to Europe was recently published by Oxford University Press. Her new research focuses on the assassination of Nasir al-Din Shah in 1896 by a follower of Jamal al-Din al-Afghani. In addition to her scholarship on the nineteenth century, Professor Sohrabi writes and lectures on contemporary politics and culture of Iran.

    • 42 min.

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