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Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

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    • Wetenschap
    • 4.3 • 4 beoordelingen

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

    How the new COVID-19 vaccines work, and restoring vision with brain implants

    How the new COVID-19 vaccines work, and restoring vision with brain implants

    Staff Writer Meredith Wadman and host Sarah Crespi discuss what to expect from the two messenger RNA–based vaccines against COVID-19 that have recently released encouraging results from their phase III trials and the short-term side effects some recipients might see on the day of injection.

    Sarah also talks with researcher Xing Chen, a project co-leader and postdoctoral scientist at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, about using brain stimulation to restore vision. Researchers have known for about 70 years that electrical stimulation at certain points in the brain can lead to the appearance of a phosphene—a spot of light that appears not because there’s light there, but because of some other stimulation, like pressing on the eyeball. If electrical stimulation can make a little light appear, how about many lights? Can we think about phosphenes as pixels and draw a picture for the brain? How about a moving picture?

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 21 min.
    Keeping coronavirus from spreading in schools, why leaves fall when they do, and a book on how nature deals with crisis

    Keeping coronavirus from spreading in schools, why leaves fall when they do, and a book on how nature deals with crisis

    Many schools closed in the spring, during the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic. Many opened in the fall. Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about what was learned in spring about how coronavirus spreads in schools that might help keep children safe as cases surge once again.

    Also this week: What makes leaves fall off deciduous trees when they do—is it the short, cold nights? Or is the timing of so-called “leaf senescence” linked to when spring happens? Sarah talked to Constantin Zohner, a lead scientist at the Institute of Integrative Biology at ETH Zurich, about his tree leaf timing study. Sarah also spoke with commentary author Christy Rollinson, a forest ecologist at the Morton Arboretum, about how important these trees and the timing of their leaf drop is for climate change.

    In the books segment, host Kiki Sanford talks with Ruth DeFries about her book, What Would Nature Do? A Guide for Our Uncertain Times.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 39 min.
    Fish farming’s future, and how microbes compete for space on our face

    Fish farming’s future, and how microbes compete for space on our face

    These days, about half of the protein the world’s population eats is from seafood. Staff Writer Erik Stokstad joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about how brand-new biotech and old-fashioned breeding programs are helping keep up with demand, by expanding where we can farm fish and how fast we can grow them.

    Sarah also spoke with Jan Claesen, an assistant professor at the Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute, about skin microbes that use their own antibiotic to fight off harmful bacteria. Understanding the microbes native to our skin and the molecules they produce could lead to treatments for skin disorders such as atopic dermatitis and acne.

    Finally, in a segment sponsored by MilliporeSigma, Science’s Custom Publishing Director and Senior Editor Sean Sanders talks with Timothy Cernak, an assistant professor of medicinal chemistry and chemistry at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, about retrosynthesis—the process of starting with a known chemical final product and figuring out how to make that molecule efficiently from available pieces.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 38 min.
    How the human body handles extreme heat, and improvements in cooling clothes

    How the human body handles extreme heat, and improvements in cooling clothes

    This week the whole show focuses on keeping cool in a warming world. First up, host Sarah Crespi talks with Senior News Correspondent Elizabeth Pennisi about the latest research into how to stay safe when things heat up—whether you’re running marathons or fighting fires. 

    Sarah also talks with Po-Chun Hsu, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Duke University, about the future of cooling fabrics for everyday use. It turns out we can save a lot of energy and avoid carbon dioxide emissions by wearing clothing designed to keep us cool in slightly warmer buildings than we’re used to now. But the question is, will cooling clothes ever be “cool”?

    Visit the whole special issue on cooling.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 23 min.
    What we can learn from a mass of black hole mergers, and ecological insights from 30 years of Arctic animal movements

    What we can learn from a mass of black hole mergers, and ecological insights from 30 years of Arctic animal movements

    First up, host Sarah Crespi talks with Staff Writer Adrian Cho about new gravitational wave detections from the first half of 2019—including 37 new black hole mergers. With so many mergers now recorded, astrophysicists can do different kinds of research into things like how new pairs of black holes come to be and how often they merge.

    Sarah also talks with Sarah Davidson, data curator at the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior, about results from an Arctic animal tracking project that includes 3 decades of location information on many species, from soaring golden eagles to baby caribou taking their first steps. The early results from the Arctic Animal Movement Archive show that researchers can use the database as a baseline for future Arctic investigations and to examine the effects of climate on ecosystems in this key region.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 27 min.
    Taking the politicians out of tough policy decisions; the late, great works of Charles Turner; and the science of cooking

    Taking the politicians out of tough policy decisions; the late, great works of Charles Turner; and the science of cooking

    First up, host Sarah Crespi talks to News Intern Cathleen O’Grady about the growing use of citizens’ assemblies, or “minipublics,” to deliberate on tough policy questions like climate change and abortion. Can random groups of citizens do a better job forming policy than politicians?

    Next, we feature the latest of a new series of insight pieces that revisit landmark Science papers. Sarah talks with Hiruni Samadi Galpayage Dona, a Ph.D. student at Queen Mary University of London, about Charles Turner, a Black zoologist who published multiple times in Science in the early 1900s. Despite being far ahead of his time in his studies of animal cognition, Turner’s work was long overlooked—due in large part to the many difficulties facing a Black man in academia at the turn of the century.

    Finally, in our monthly books segment, host Kiki Sanford chats with author Pia Sorensen about her new book: Science and Cooking: Physics Meets Food, From Homemade to Haute Cuisine.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 43 min.

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