512 episodes

Vox Conversations brings you discussions between the brightest minds and the deepest thinkers; conversations that will cause you to question old assumptions and think about the world and our role in it in a new light. Join Sean Illing, Jamil Smith, and their colleagues across the Vox newsroom for new episodes every Monday and Thursday.

Vox Conversations Vox

    • Maatschappij & cultuur
    • 4.6 • 69 Ratings

Vox Conversations brings you discussions between the brightest minds and the deepest thinkers; conversations that will cause you to question old assumptions and think about the world and our role in it in a new light. Join Sean Illing, Jamil Smith, and their colleagues across the Vox newsroom for new episodes every Monday and Thursday.

    Rethinking the "end of history"

    Rethinking the "end of history"

    Sean Illing talks with political scientist and author Francis Fukuyama, whose ideas about the "end of history" and the ideological supremacy of liberal democracy became well-known through his 1989 essay "The End of History?". They discuss Fukuyama's new book, Liberalism and Its Discontents, as well as some of the modern challenges facing liberalism today, what Fukuyama thinks of the radically redistributive politics of the Bernie Sanders campaign, and whether he thinks it's still the case that liberal democracy stands victorious in the war of ideas.
    Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), Interviews Writer, Vox
    Guest: Francis Fukuyama (@FukuyamaFrancis), author; professor, Stanford University
    References: 


    Liberalism and Its Discontents by Francis Fukuyama (FSG; 2022)


    "The End of History?" by Francis Fukuyama (The National Interest, v. 16; Summer 1989)


    The End of History and the Last Man by Francis Fukuyama (Free Press; 1992)


    "Francis Fukuyama Predicted the End of History. It's Back (Again)," by Jennifer Schuessler (New York Times; May 10)


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    This episode was made by: 


    Producer: Erikk Geannikis


    Editor: Amy Drozdowska


    Engineer: Patrick Boyd


    Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall


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    • 1 hr 2 min
    Anita Hill finally gets even

    Anita Hill finally gets even

    Vox's Fabiola Cineas talks with Anita Hill, whose testimony during the 1991 confirmation hearings for now-Justice Clarence Thomas highlighted the prominence of sexual harassment and unwanted sexual advances in the workplace. Hill discusses how those hearings changed her, whether or not she has respect for the Supreme Court as an institution, and how her fight to stop gender violence continues today.
    Host: Fabiola Cineas (@FabiolaCineas), Reporter, Vox
    Guest: Anita Hill (@AnitaHill), professor, Brandeis University
    References: 


    Getting Even with Anita Hill (Pushkin)


    Believing: Our Thirty-Year Journey to End Gender Violence by Anita Hill (Viking; 2021)


    Strange Justice: The Selling of Clarence Thomas by Jane Mayer and Jill Abramson (1994)


    Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts.
    Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.
    Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts
    This episode was made by: 


    Producer: Erikk Geannikis


    Editor: Amy Drozdowska


    Engineer: Patrick Boyd


    Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall


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    • 1 hr 1 min
    Elites have captured identity politics

    Elites have captured identity politics

    Sean Illing talks with Olúfẹ́mi Táíwò, whose new book Elite Capture is about how the wealthy and powerful co-opt political movements, and use the language of progressive activism to further their ends. They discuss the history and meaning of "identity politics," the notion of "woke capitalism," and how to arrive at a more constructive politics — one that actually engages directly in redistributing social resources and power, rather than achieving merely symbolic gains.
    Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), Interviews Writer, Vox
    Guest: Olúfẹ́mi Táíwò (@OlufemiOTaiwo), author; professor of philosophy, Georgetown University
    References: 


    Elite Capture: How the Powerful Took Over Identity Politics (And Everything Else) by Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò (Haymarket; 2022)


    "Identity Politics and Elite Capture" by Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò (Boston Review; May 7, 2020)


    "Niani S. Phillips is an Environmentalist with a serious commitment to sustainability." (McDonald's YouTube; Mar. 31)


    The Combahee River Collective Statement (1977)


    "Until Black Women Are Free, None of Us Will Be Free" by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor (New Yorker; July 20, 2020)


    "Black Lives Matter Secretly Bought a $6 Million House" by Sean Campbell (Intelligencer; Apr. 4)


    Why I Am Not A Feminist: A Feminist Manifesto by Jessa Crispin (Melville House; 2017)


    "What's New About Woke Racial Capitalism (And What Isn't)" by Enzo Rossi and Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò (Spectre; Dec. 18, 2020)


    Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts.
    Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.
    Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts
    This episode was made by: 


    Producer: Erikk Geannikis


    Editor: Amy Drozdowska


    Engineer: Patrick Boyd


    Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall


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    • 58 min
    The moral dangers of dirty work

    The moral dangers of dirty work

    Vox’s Jamil Smith talks with journalist and author Eyal Press about "dirty work" — the jobs Americans do that, as Press explains, can lead workers to perform morally compromising activities unwittingly. They discuss examples of this kind of work (drone pilots, meat packers, prison aides), talk about its relation to the term "essential workers" that gained prominence during the pandemic, and explain how certain jobs highlight the disparities of class, race, and gender in American society.
    Host: Jamil Smith (@JamilSmith), Senior Correspondent, Vox
    Guest: Eyal Press (@EyalPress), author; journalist
    References: 


    Dirty Work: Essential Jobs and the Hidden Toll of Inequality in America by Eyal Press (FSG; 2021)


    "What does it mean to take America's 'jobs of last resort'?" by Jamil Smith (Vox; Apr. 22)


    Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty by Patrick Radden Keefe (Doubleday; 2021)


    The Social Network, dir. David Fincher (2010)


    The Jungle by Upton Sinclair (1906)


    The Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison (1952)


    The Civilizing Process by Norbert Elias (1939)


    "Good People and Dirty Work" by Everett C. Hughes (Social Problems, vol. 10 (1); 1962)


    The Line Becomes a River by Francisco Cantú (Riverhead; 2019)


    "Inside the Massive Jail that Doubles as Chicago's Largest Mental Health Facility" by Lili Holzer-Glier (Vera Institute of Justice; 2016)


    Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts.
    Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.
    Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts
    This episode was made by: 


    Producer: Erikk Geannikis


    Editor: Amy Drozdowska


    Engineer: Patrick Boyd


    Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall


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    • 59 min
    Did the sexual revolution go wrong?

    Did the sexual revolution go wrong?

    Sean Illing talks with author and Washington Post columnist Christine Emba about whether or not we need to rethink sex. They discuss why, according to the research and reporting in Emba's new book Rethinking Sex, many Americans are unhappy with the sex they're having, and don't fully understand what they want. They also talk about how her Catholic faith informs her views on sex, why it's necessary to expand on the framework of "consent," and what kind of sexual culture Emba hopes to see in the world.
    Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), Interviews Writer, Vox
    Guest: Christine Emba (@ChristineEmba), author & reporter
    References: 


    Rethinking Sex: A Provocation by Christine Emba (Sentinel; 2022)


    "Consent is not enough. We need a new sexual ethic," by Christine Emba (Washington Post; Mar. 17)


    "People Have Been Having Less Sex—whether They're Teenagers or 40-Somethings" by Emily Willingham (Scientific American; Jan. 3)


    Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts.
    Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.
    Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts
    This episode was made by: 


    Producer: Erikk Geannikis


    Editor: Amy Drozdowska


    Engineer: Paul Robert Mounsey


    Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall


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    • 58 min
    Who decides how to conserve nature?

    Who decides how to conserve nature?

    Vox's Benji Jones talks with Indigenous leader Kimaren ole Riamit about the role of Indigenous peoples in the conservation movement. Bringing the perspective of his upbringing in the Kenyan Maasai pastoral community as well as advanced degrees earned at Western institutions, Kimaren discusses with Benji the power and potential of Indigenous knowledge in combating the climate crisis, and the challenges in bridging that knowledge with the global conservation effort.
    Host: Benji Jones (@BenjiSJones), Environmental reporter, Vox
    Guest: Kimaren ole Riamit, Maasai leader
    References: 

    "Growing up Maasai and the art of healing the Earth" by Benji Jones (Vox; Mar. 16)

    Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts.
    Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app.
    Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts
    This episode was made by: 


    Producer: Erikk Geannikis


    Editor: Amy Drozdowska


    Engineer: Paul Robert Mounsey


    Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall


    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 56 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
69 Ratings

69 Ratings

mjmdeboer ,

Very inspiring

I love most topics, very interesting, in depth.

marcsteen ,

Brilliant

I really am a fan of Ezra Klein. And if the interesting guests he invites for dialogues. Often about politics and social issues. Sometimes about technology, innovation, culture, literature, and “alternative” topics like psychedelics.

Eliasses ,

Excellent

Always informed and completely involved.

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