11 episodes

Since 1887, the Penn Museum has been one of the leading archaeology and anthropology museums in the world, and has sponsored research in every corner of the globe. Among the highlights of the Museum's Mediterranean research are the excavation of King Midas' tomb at Gordion in Turkey, the spearheading of the discipline of underwater archaeology, and extensive excavations to uncover the ancient Etruscan, Roman and Greek cultures.

Archaeology: The Mediterranean University of Pennsylvania

    • History
    • 3.0 • 3 Ratings

Since 1887, the Penn Museum has been one of the leading archaeology and anthropology museums in the world, and has sponsored research in every corner of the globe. Among the highlights of the Museum's Mediterranean research are the excavation of King Midas' tomb at Gordion in Turkey, the spearheading of the discipline of underwater archaeology, and extensive excavations to uncover the ancient Etruscan, Roman and Greek cultures.

    • video
    Footage from King Midas' Tomb at Gordion Turkey, 1951 and 1957

    Footage from King Midas' Tomb at Gordion Turkey, 1951 and 1957

    This footage was shot during two excavation seasons at Gordion, Turkey in 1951 and 1957. The Midas Mound was opened in 1957 by an archaeological team headed by Rodney Young who appears at the beginning of the film and makes a brief appearance as he pieces together decorative wall moldings. The footage from 1951 shows men from a local village building a mud brick house at the site. The workers used mules to haul away debris during excavation. Also captured on film are the first images of the opening of the Tomb of King Midas. Footage includes shots of King Midas skeleton, cauldrons, belts, safety pins, and metal bowls strewn about the grave.

    The footage from 1957 was shot by Samuel B. Eckert (1884-1973), who served as a member of the Board of Managers of The University Museum from 1943-1973.

    • 4 min
    • video
    Gordion: Open-Air Archaeological Site as Garden, Historical Landscape as Park

    Gordion: Open-Air Archaeological Site as Garden, Historical Landscape as Park

    By the 1990s, after more than 40 years of archaeological investigation, the deterioration of the standing ruins at Gordion was hard to ignore. After a government sponsored water project brought irrigation to fields far from the river, agricultural development has steadily encroached on the ancient tumuli that characterize the region. For the past 15-20 years, the Gordion project has been attempting to mitigate the adverse effects of climate and economic development on the archaeological resources. This talk focuses on how an understanding of the modern vegetation can inform and enhance both preservation and the touristic experience.

    Presented by the Penn Museum's Research Project Manager, Dr. Naomi Miller.

    • 57 min
    Recent Research on the Colosseum

    Recent Research on the Colosseum

    Dr. Lynne Lancaster, Professor of Classical Archaeology at Ohio University, presents the Kenneth Matthews Lecture in Roman Archaeology "Recent Research on the Colosseum" on February 19th, 2009.

    • 52 min
    The Legacy of Zeus: The Mt. Lykaion Excavation and Survey Project

    The Legacy of Zeus: The Mt. Lykaion Excavation and Survey Project

    • 59 min
    The Search for Zeus

    The Search for Zeus

    • 1 hr 11 min
    The Land of Kuri: How American and Cypriot Archaeologists Revealed the Past of the Island's Southern Shore

    The Land of Kuri: How American and Cypriot Archaeologists Revealed the Past of the Island's Southern Shore

    • 49 min

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