33 episodes

BrainPod is the podcast from the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, produced in association with Nature Publishing Group. Join us as we delve into the latest basic and clinical research that advance our understanding of the brain and behavior, featuring highlighted content from a top journal in fields of neuroscience, psychiatry, and pharmacology. For complete access to the original papers and reviews featured in this podcast, subscribe to Neuropsychopharmacology.

Neuropsychopharmacology Podcast Nature

    • Science

BrainPod is the podcast from the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, produced in association with Nature Publishing Group. Join us as we delve into the latest basic and clinical research that advance our understanding of the brain and behavior, featuring highlighted content from a top journal in fields of neuroscience, psychiatry, and pharmacology. For complete access to the original papers and reviews featured in this podcast, subscribe to Neuropsychopharmacology.

    Acute dose-dependent effects of lysergic acid diethylamide in a double-blind placebo-controlled study in healthy subjects

    Acute dose-dependent effects of lysergic acid diethylamide in a double-blind placebo-controlled study in healthy subjects

    Interest is growing in the use of the psychedelic drug LSD for psychiatric research and even potentially for treatment. But placebo-controlled studies conducted to date have used just one dose of the drug—none have investigated the impacts of a variety of dosages within the same subjects. In addition, past studies did not use pharmaceutically-defined dosages of LSD, which has made verifying the effects of a particular dose difficult. To address this gap, Matthias Liechti, professor in the department of clinical pharmacology and toxicology at the University of Basel in Switzerland, and his colleagues conducted a study.
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 9 min
    Big behavior: challenges and opportunities in a new era of deep behavior profiling

    Big behavior: challenges and opportunities in a new era of deep behavior profiling

    Scientists who study neuropsychiatric conditions and treatments often use rodent models to do so. From depression to anxiety to memory impairment and impulsivity, there are certain rodent behaviors that are used to represent these types of conditions in humans. And to use these models, researchers have had to watch the animals live or on video and jot down every instance of, say, exploratory behavior. As the process is labor intensive and results vary slightly from researcher to researcher, Dr. Bohacheck and his colleagues created a new system based on machine learning, and they published the results of their study in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, along with a review of the field. 
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 9 min
    Leveraging large genomic datasets to illuminate the pathobiology of autism spectrum disorders

    Leveraging large genomic datasets to illuminate the pathobiology of autism spectrum disorders

    The application of the study of genetics and the use of big data to identify patterns of inheritance as well as de novo mutations has had a dramatic impact on the field of Autism Spectrum Disorder research, and it offers pathways to a greater understanding of biological mechanisms, even potentially treatments. Matthew State, chair of the department of psychiatry at University of California San Francisco, and his colleagues wrote a review paper in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, called “Leveraging large genomic datasets to illuminate the pathobiology of autism spectrum disorders.” Have a listen to learn more!
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 9 min
    Pubertal adversity alters chromatin dynamics and stress circuitry in the pregnant brain

    Pubertal adversity alters chromatin dynamics and stress circuitry in the pregnant brain

    It’s understood in epidemiological research that women who experience trauma during puberty are at significantly higher risk for affective disorders such as depression and anxiety when they become pregnant. And so Tracy Bale, a professor in the departments of psychology and psychiatry at the University of Maryland in Baltimore, has done several studies using mice to try to model and understand this effect. In her latest paper in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, she and her colleagues set out to study just what was happening to make the mouse brain so vulnerable to stress and trauma during puberty, and how this was activated during the hormonal onslaught of pregnancy.
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 9 min
    Social networking and mental health: looking beyond frequency of use and towards mechanisms of action

    Social networking and mental health: looking beyond frequency of use and towards mechanisms of action

    Over the past decades, there’s clearly been a dramatic increase in the amount of time people spend online using social networking sites. For instance, Facebook and Instagram have literally billions of users. At the same time, there’s been a rise in mental health issues for young people from teens through their mid 20s. The rise in these issues has been seen particularly for Millennials and the I generation, both of which grew up with increased access to and use of social networking sites. As a result, some have drawn the conclusion that perhaps the two are linked, and the rise in mental health issues is linked causally to the increase in time spent online, and so treatment should involve reducing social networking use. Dr. Kiara Timpano, associate professor at the University of Miami department of psychology, and Dr. Courtney Beard, co-director of the clinical research program in behavioral health at McLean Hospital and associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, reviewed the literature.
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 9 min
    Distinct acute effects of LSD, MDMA, and D-amphetamine in healthy subjects

    Distinct acute effects of LSD, MDMA, and D-amphetamine in healthy subjects

    A number of drugs that are used recreationally are now being studied for their use in psychopharmacology. But while the ways in which these drugs are similar or different has been described anecdotally by recreational users, they haven’t been studied in comparison to one another. Dr. Matthias Liechti and his team of researchers recently published a study in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, in which 28 healthy subjects, men and women, take doses of LSD, MDMA, amphetamines, and a placebo over four different sessions. Dr. Liechti says this blinding is important; in other studies, participants either have taken a drug or a placebo and can tell when they’re taking the drug. But in this case they don’t know which drug they’re taking, which allows the effects of the drugs to be compared against each other. Take a listen to find out more!
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 9 min

Top Podcasts In Science

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by Nature