202 episodes

"Speaking of Psychology" is an audio podcast series highlighting some of the latest, most important and relevant psychological research being conducted today. Produced by the American Psychological Association, these podcasts will help listeners apply the science of psychology to their everyday lives.

Speaking of Psychology American Psychological Association

    • Science
    • 4.5 • 4 Ratings

"Speaking of Psychology" is an audio podcast series highlighting some of the latest, most important and relevant psychological research being conducted today. Produced by the American Psychological Association, these podcasts will help listeners apply the science of psychology to their everyday lives.

    Why is it so hard for adults to make friends? With Maris Franco, PhD

    Why is it so hard for adults to make friends? With Maris Franco, PhD

    As an adult, making new friends – and maintaining old friendships – can be tough. Life is busy and friends end up taking a backseat to other relationships and responsibilities. Dr. Marisa Franco, psychologist and friendship expert, talks about how to make new friends and strengthen and rekindle old friendship ties, why Americans’ friendship networks are shrinking, the differences between men’s and women’s friendships, and more.

    • 29 min
    The people who never forget a face, with Josh Davis, PhD, and Kelly Desborough

    The people who never forget a face, with Josh Davis, PhD, and Kelly Desborough

    Super-recognizers have an extraordinary ability to recognize faces – they can pick faces they’ve seen only briefly out of a crowd and can recognize childhood acquaintances they haven’t seen in decades. Dr. Josh Davis, a professor of applied psychology at the University of Greenwich, and super-recognizer Kelly Desborough, discuss the origins of this ability, why you can’t train yourself to be a super-recognizer, how super-recognizers compare with facial-recognition algorithms, and why security organizations are interested in working with super-recognizers.

    • 33 min
    What is anxiety and how can we treat it effectively? With Bunmi Olatunji, PhD

    What is anxiety and how can we treat it effectively? With Bunmi Olatunji, PhD

    We’ve all had good reason to feel anxious over the past two years. But sometimes, anxiety is more than a normal response to stress. Anxiety disorders are among the most common of all mental health disorders, affecting an estimated 15% to 20% of people at some point in their life. Dr. Bunmi Olatunji, director of the Emotion and Anxiety Research Lab at Vanderbilt University, discusses the emotions that drive anxiety disorders, how to treat them effectively, and how people can recognize the difference between feeling anxious and an anxiety disorder – and know when it’s time to seek help.

    • 20 min
    Healing pain by treating the mind, with Tor Wager, PhD

    Healing pain by treating the mind, with Tor Wager, PhD

    More than 20 percent of U.S. adults suffer from some form of chronic pain. For many, effective treatment remains elusive, with medications and even surgeries giving little in the way of relief. But in recent years, psychologists’ research has begun to suggest that at least for some people, the answer to chronic pain may come not from healing the body but from treating the mind. Dr. Tor Wager, of Dartmouth University, discusses the relationship among our thoughts, feelings and beliefs about pain and the actual physical pain that we feel, what pain looks like in the brain, and how new research findings are leading to effective new treatments for pain.

    • 36 min
    Encore - Unlocking the mysteries of smell, our most underappreciated sense, with Pamela Dalton, PhD

    Encore - Unlocking the mysteries of smell, our most underappreciated sense, with Pamela Dalton, PhD

    Many people around the world have lost their sense of smell this past year due to COVID-19. Before the pandemic, scientists had already begun to gain a deeper understanding of how sophisticated our sense of smell is and how it is intertwined with our mental and physical health. Now, the pandemic is giving that research new urgency. Pamela Dalton, PhD, of the Monell Chemical Senses Center, discusses what we know about how our sense of smell works, the connections between smell, emotions and memory, how a rapid smell test could improve COVID-19 screening, how she developed the “world’s worst smell,” and more.
    Links

    Pamela Dalton, PhD
    Monell Chemical Senses Center

    Music
    Electronic Ambient Loop by tyops via Freesound.org

    • 34 min
    Encore - What is it like to remember every day of your life, with Michael Yassa, PhD, and Markie Pasternak

    Encore - What is it like to remember every day of your life, with Michael Yassa, PhD, and Markie Pasternak

    For people with Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory, or HSAM, every day is memorable. Ask them what they were doing on this date 10 years ago, and they’ll be able to tell you. Markie Pasternak, one of the youngest people identified with HSAM, and Michael Yassa, PhD, director of the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory at the University of California Irvine, talk about what it’s like to have this ability, what we know about how the brains of people with HSAM store and retrieve this vast amount of autobiographical information, and what studying this unique ability can teach us more generally about how memory works.

    • 39 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
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