299 episodes

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The Daily The New York Times

    • Daily News
    • 4.8, 569 Ratings

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    ‘Stay Black and Die’

    ‘Stay Black and Die’

    Demonstrations against police brutality are entering their third month, but meaningful policy action has not happened. We speak with one demonstrator about her journey to the front lines of recent protests — and the lessons she’s learned about the pace of change.

    Caitlin Dickerson, an immigration reporter at The New York Times, spoke with Sharhonda Bossier, deputy director at Education Leaders of Color, an advocacy group.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: While protests in most American cities have tapered off, the confrontation between protesters and federal agents in downtown Portland, Ore., continues.Here is our latest reporting on the protests against racism and police violence that spread around the world after the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May.

    • 41 min
    Is the U.S. Ready to Vote by Mail?

    Is the U.S. Ready to Vote by Mail?

    The United States is preparing to hold its first ever socially distant presidential election. But will it actually work?

    Guest: Reid J. Epstein, who covers campaigns and elections for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: President Trump’s suggestion that the Nov. 3 vote could be delayed — something he cannot do on his own — drew unusually firm Republican resistance and signaled worry about his re-election bid.Georgia’s troubled primary elections in June may be a preview of graver battles coming in the general election.

    • 24 min
    Wrongfully Accused by an Algorithm

    Wrongfully Accused by an Algorithm

    Facial recognition is becoming an increasingly central component of police departments’ efforts to solve crimes. But can algorithms harbor racial bias?

    Guest: Annie Brown, a producer for The New York Times, speaks with Kashmir Hill, a technology reporter, about her interview with Robert Julian-Borchak Williams, who was arrested after being misidentified as a criminal by an algorithm. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: In response to Mr. Williams’s story being published by The New York Times, the Wayne County prosecutor’s office said that he could have the case and his fingerprint data expunged.

    • 25 min
    The Sunday Read: 'On Female Rage'

    The Sunday Read: 'On Female Rage'

    In this episode, Leslie Jamison, a writer and teacher, explores the potentially constructive force of female anger — and the shame that can get attached to it.

    This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

    • 33 min
    A #MeToo Moment in the Military

    A #MeToo Moment in the Military

    The remains of Vanessa Guillen, an Army specialist, were discovered last month about 25 miles from Fort Hood in central Texas. She was the victim, officials said, of a fellow soldier. Now her death has attracted the attention of the nation — veterans, active-duty service members and civilians.

    Today, we examine what some claim to be a pervasive culture of sexual harassment inside the U.S. military. Guest: Jennifer Steinhauer, a Washington reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: Women from the military say the response to Specialist Guillen’s killing is their #MeToo moment and a prompt to examine racial inequities in the service.

    • 28 min
    The Big Tech Hearing

    The Big Tech Hearing

    The C.E.O.s of America’s most influential technology companies — Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook — were brought before Congress to answer a question: Are they too powerful?

    Today, we talk to our colleague who was in the room about what happened. Guest: Cecilia Kang, a technology and regulatory policy reporter for The New York Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: In the hearing, the chiefs of Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook faced withering questions from Democrats about anti-competitive practices and from Republicans about anti-conservative bias.

    • 33 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
569 Ratings

569 Ratings

Osebergianeren. ,

En av de beste;

Det er topp3 podcast for meg. Kvalitetsjournalistikk på sitt beste🇳🇴

From Norway

Terje O Askeland

Fredrik1234567890 ,

Barbaro’s tonation needs a treatment of monotone

Contents is good, but Michael Barbaro’s tonation is the perfect parody of itself. It can’t be more of what it is and it’s way too much. Every sentence ; slight pitch up and then straight down. It’s extremely irritating. Calm down and add some monotone please. Probably a great guy, but the tonation is not. 😖

Louisa90 ,

Amazing!

Amazing good podcast and very well made!
Look forward to the episode everyday🤗

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