704 episodes

Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

The Intelligence from The Economist The Economist

    • Nyheter
    • 4.9 • 34 Ratings

Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

    Flu into a rage: Brazil’s Bolsonaro inquiry

    Flu into a rage: Brazil’s Bolsonaro inquiry

    President Jair Bolsonaro’s early dismissal of the pandemic as “a little flu” presaged a calamitous handling of the crisis. We ask how a congressional investigation’s dramatic assessment of his non-actions may damage him. China’s test of a hypersonic, nuclear-capable glider may rattle the global weapons order. And our obituaries editor reflects on the life of level-headed American statesman Colin Powell.
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    • 21 min
    States of emergency: Nigeria

    States of emergency: Nigeria

    Criminal gangs in north-western states, jihadists in the north-east, a rebellion in the south-east: kidnappers, warlords and cattle rustlers are making the country ungovernable. The new head of Samsung Electronics has a legacy to build—and aims to do so by breaking into the cut-throat business of processor chips. And the sci-fi classic “Dune” gets a good cinematic treatment at last.
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    • 23 min
    Gas-trick distress: a visit to Ukraine

    Gas-trick distress: a visit to Ukraine

    Russia continues to pile pressure on the country, and will soon have the power to cut off its natural gas. Our correspondent pays a visit to find how Ukrainians cope. The simplest solution to renewables’ intermittency is to move electricity around—but that requires vast new international networks of seriously beefy cables. And Canada’s version of American football is wasting away. 
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    • 20 min
    Meeting them where they are: a British MP’s murder

    Meeting them where they are: a British MP’s murder

    Sir David Amess was killed doing what he loved: speaking directly with voters. We examine the dangers inherent in the “constituency surgeries” that British politicians cherish. The fight against tuberculosis is made harder by mutations that confer drug resistance; we look at research that has traced nearly every one of them. And why Andy Warhol is big in Iran, again.
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    • 20 min
    Chinese draggin’: growth slows

    Chinese draggin’: growth slows

    A paltry GDP rise is down to the pandemic, power and property. We ask what growing pains President Xi Jinping will endure in the name of economic reforms. Emmanuel Macron, France’s president, will probably end up in the second round of next year’s election; who will stand against him is ever more unpredictable. And fixing meeting inefficiency with an 850-year-old idea.
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    • 19 min
    Port, and a storm: sectarian violence in Lebanon

    Port, and a storm: sectarian violence in Lebanon

    The effort to investigate last year’s port explosion in Beirut has fired up political and religious tensions—resulting in Lebanon’s worst violence in years. We speak with Dmitry Muratov, a Russian journalist who shared this year’s Nobel peace prize, about what the award means to him, and to press freedom. And why autocratic regimes like to snap up English football clubs.
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    • 23 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
34 Ratings

34 Ratings

Śäkya ,

My daily half hour of news

It tell a story each episode that matters to me.

Gustgeo ,

Great topic selection

Very informative selection of world news and interesting topics delivered on a spectacular way! This is a “every day” podcast that never wastes your time!

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