100 episodes

The International Association of Privacy Professionals is the largest and most comprehensive global information privacy community and resource, helping practitioners develop and advance their careers and organizations manage and protect their data. More than just a professional association, the IAPP provides a home for privacy professionals around the world to gather, share experiences and enrich their knowledge.

Founded in 2000, the IAPP is a not-for-profit association with more than 70,000 members in 100 countries. The IAPP helps define, support and improve the privacy profession through networking, education and certification.

This podcast features IAPP Editorial Director Jedidiah Bracy, who interviews privacy pros and thought leaders from around the world about technology, law, policy and the privacy profession.

The Privacy Advisor Podcast Jedidiah Bracy, IAPP Editorial Director

    • Business
    • 3.0 • 1 Rating

The International Association of Privacy Professionals is the largest and most comprehensive global information privacy community and resource, helping practitioners develop and advance their careers and organizations manage and protect their data. More than just a professional association, the IAPP provides a home for privacy professionals around the world to gather, share experiences and enrich their knowledge.

Founded in 2000, the IAPP is a not-for-profit association with more than 70,000 members in 100 countries. The IAPP helps define, support and improve the privacy profession through networking, education and certification.

This podcast features IAPP Editorial Director Jedidiah Bracy, who interviews privacy pros and thought leaders from around the world about technology, law, policy and the privacy profession.

    Is competition and privacy regulation facing a transformative moment?

    Is competition and privacy regulation facing a transformative moment?

    Data protection and competition enforcement have been on a collision course in recent years. The Big Tech platforms have amassed powerful market share with vast amounts of user data. This inevitable convergence is shaping up on both sides of the Atlantic. U.S. President Joe Biden has appointed notable antitrust proponents to powerful government positions in recent months. And in Brussels, the European Commission has released a slew of draft legislation to help bolster its Digital Single Market efforts, curtail Big Tech hegemony, and promote competition. Journalist Samuel Stolton has been following these developments with an ear to the ground in Brussels. Host Jedidiah Bracy recently caught up with Stolton right as news emerged that Amazon faces a record $888 million fine related to GDPR violations.

    • 52 min
    Ohio Lt. Governor Jon Husted discusses the state's privacy bill

    Ohio Lt. Governor Jon Husted discusses the state's privacy bill

    On July 13, Ohio Lt. Governor Jon Husted announced the introduction of the Ohio Personal Privacy Act. The law applies to organizations doing business in Ohio or whose products or services target consumers in the state. Businesses with annual gross revenues exceeding $25 million, or process personal data of 100,000 or more Ohio consumers, or derive 50% of gross annual revenues from the sale of personal data would be covered. Like other laws, it does offer some consumer rights, including correction, deletion and portability, as well as an opt-out right for the sale of personal data. Most notably, the OPPA includes a carve out for businesses that reasonably conform with the U.S. National Institution of Standards and Technology’s Privacy Framework. Host Jedidiah Bracy recently caught up with Husted to discuss the bill, the NIST provision, and what the OPPA could mean for the future of privacy law at the state, federal and international levels. 

    • 25 min
    The rise of the voice-intelligence industry: A discussion with Joseph Turow

    The rise of the voice-intelligence industry: A discussion with Joseph Turow

    Voice-activated products and services are proliferating, while voice-recognition technology is on the rise. In addition to popular voice-activated assistants, call centers are beginning to use advanced voice-intelligence technology in novels ways. The technology could lead to plenty of innovation, but the potential privacy, safety and fairness issues will need some thinking. In his new book "The Voice Catchers: How Marketers Listen In to Exploit Your Feelings, Your Privacy, and Your Wallet," Joseph Turow describes the rise of what he calls the “voice intelligence industry” and how artificial intelligence is enabling personalized marketing and profiling through voice analysis. IAPP Editorial Director Jedidiah Bracy caught up with Turow to discuss the potential privacy issues and what privacy pros and policy makers should be thinking about with this nascent industry.

    • 58 min
    Rethinking notice and consent - A chat with Jen King

    Rethinking notice and consent - A chat with Jen King

    Notice and consent have been foundational principles in privacy and data protection for decades. But do they provide individuals with the ability to make informed decisions as they navigate products and services? Will laws like the California Privacy Rights Act help change how companies design their privacy notices? For Jennifer King, the Privacy and Data Policy Fellow at Stanford's Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, the notice-and-consent paradigm as it currently stands is a “farce” that needs an overhaul, not just from a legal standpoint, but also from a human-technology interaction perspective. IAPP Editorial Director Jedidiah Bracy chats with King about what's needed for an effective paradigm shift in this space. 

    • 46 min
    Rep. Suzan DelBene on the need for a federal US privacy law

    Rep. Suzan DelBene on the need for a federal US privacy law

    Prospects for a federal privacy law in the U.S. ramped up in recent years, but even though data protection is a bipartisan issue, nothing has come close to passing. At the same time, U.S. state activity is swarming, and many countries around the world are developing and implementing their own national privacy laws. So what’s it going to take for the U.S. to pass a federal law? Rep. Suzan DelBene, D-Wash., was the first congressional lawmaker to propose federal privacy legislation in 2021. Her bill received praise from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and other industry groups for its approach, but does the bill have what it takes to cross the finish line? The Privacy Advisor Podcast host Jedidiah Bracy recently caught up with DelBene to talk about her proposed bill, the state of play on Capitol Hill, and what it will take for the U.S. to pass federal privacy legislation.

    • 40 min
    Exploring emotion-detection technology: A conversation with Ben Bland

    Exploring emotion-detection technology: A conversation with Ben Bland

    Artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies are rapidly developing across virtually all sectors of the global economy. One nascent field is empathic technology, which, for better or worse, includes emotion detection. It is estimated that the emotion detection industry could be worth $56 billion by 2024. However, judging a person's emotional state is subjective and raises a host of privacy, fairness, and ethical questions. Ben Bland has worked in the empathic technology space in recent years and now chairs the IEEE's P7014 Working Group to develop a global standard for the ethics of empathic technology. We recently caught up to discuss the pros and cons of the technology and his work with IEEE. 

    • 42 min

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5
1 Rating

1 Rating

EKN82 ,

Too long

Interesting topics, but as your consultant pointed out, the introduction is way too long. And in general, the episodes are too long. Should sharpen the message and the interviews. Also quite frustrating sound quality sometimes, such as for the COPA episode.

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