186 episodes

Rebecca L. Weber coaches with the sustainable strategies, mindset shifts, and creative skills development she uses to help independent writers around the world.

If you’ve got what it takes to make it as a freelance writer, but struggle with confidence, imposter syndrome, overwhelm, procrastination, time management, writer’s block, improving your craft, marketing, pitching, underearning, pursuing meaning in your work, or getting in your own way, this is the writing podcast for you.

Learn, grow, and succeed as a freelancer by identifying the wants and needs of your editors, your readers, and yourself.

Rebecca draws on her experience as a journalist covering social justice, the environment, international development, the arts, and travel for publications like CNN, the New York Times, Dwell, and Ebony.com. Download a free guide on how to pitch at www.rebeccalweber.com/5-proven-steps

The Writing Coach Podcast with Rebecca L. Weber Rebecca L. Weber

    • Business

Rebecca L. Weber coaches with the sustainable strategies, mindset shifts, and creative skills development she uses to help independent writers around the world.

If you’ve got what it takes to make it as a freelance writer, but struggle with confidence, imposter syndrome, overwhelm, procrastination, time management, writer’s block, improving your craft, marketing, pitching, underearning, pursuing meaning in your work, or getting in your own way, this is the writing podcast for you.

Learn, grow, and succeed as a freelancer by identifying the wants and needs of your editors, your readers, and yourself.

Rebecca draws on her experience as a journalist covering social justice, the environment, international development, the arts, and travel for publications like CNN, the New York Times, Dwell, and Ebony.com. Download a free guide on how to pitch at www.rebeccalweber.com/5-proven-steps

    WCP163 The late paying client

    WCP163 The late paying client

    Two months ago I invited you to take a 90-day challenge to get paid on time. That episode includes the logistics of what to do to get paid promptly … and also addresses the resistance so many freelancers have about actually doing these things.
    Overall, you’ll see a shift in your cash flow when you do this challenge. 
    But that doesn’t mean every single client will pay on time.
    Today’s episode is a real-time update of what comes next, i.e., how I handled a client last week who didn’t pay on time. 
    (Spoiler: What I share here worked. I didn’t get into weird, all-consuming, chasing payment mentality. And I received proof of payment the same day that I followed up.)
    I also share a new tip that can help both your mindset and workflow to get paid on time in the first place.
    Today’s episode is the replay of an Instagram Live, so I also answered questions about taking on a bookkeeper persona as well as what really causes writer’s block.
     
    YOU MIGHT ALSO ENJOY …
    Follow me on Instagram: @FreelanceWriterBootcamp
    Take the 90 day challenge to get paid on time: www.rebeccalweber.com/podcast153
    Spotify playlist of the greatest hits on the Writing Coach Podcast (Please rate the podcast while listening on Spotify. A 5 star rating would be much appreciated.)
    WCP 1 What’s your problem?
    Download my free guide on how to pitch
     
    WORK WITH ME
    Break into your dream publications and get paid well while covering stories that matter.
    Alumni of my small group coaching program, Freelance Writer Bootcamp, have used these proven pitching processes to break into the New York Times, the Guardian, Bustle, Fodor’s, Condé Nast Traveler, Al Jazeera, the BBC, and many more.
    Writers on the Freelance Writer Bootcamp waitlist will be first to hear when applications open for the next session, and get access to a special early bird offer only for those on the waitlist. Join the waitlist: www.FreelanceWriterBootcamp.com
    More info and complete show notes: www.rebeccalweber.com/podcast163

    • 20 min
    WCP162 Writing Coach Podcast 162 Archives, Vol. X: The research rabbit hole

    WCP162 Writing Coach Podcast 162 Archives, Vol. X: The research rabbit hole

    The research and reporting rabbit holes are some of the most seductive and appealing parts of the freelance writing comfort zone. You start off doing good work: nailing down facts, seeking rich data, locating interesting sources. But there’s always another twist and turn, and you can easily lose your orientation and not know if you’re getting closer or further away from what you and your story needs.
    If you’ve ever said that research takes as long as it takes, or noticed that it’s taking so long that it interferes with (rather than supports) your writing goals, you’ve got to listen to today’s episode.
     
    YOU MIGHT ALSO ENJOY …
    Spotify playlist of the greatest hits on the Writing Coach Podcast (please rate the podcast while listening on Spotify)
    WCP 1 What’s your problem?
    Download my free guide on how to pitch
    SHARE THE WRITING COACH PODCAST 
    Subscribe and write a review of the Writing Coach Podcast on Apple Podcasts or review on Spotify.
    Share your podcast takeaways and tag Rebecca on Instagram: @freelancewriterbootcamp 
    WORK WITH ME
    Apply for the next session of my small group coaching program: www.FreelanceWriterBootcamp.com
    Break into your dream publications and get paid well while covering stories that matter.
    Bootcamp alumni have used these proven pitching processes to break into the New York Times, the Guardian, Bustle, Fodor’s, Condé Nast Traveler, Al Jazeera, the BBC, and many more.
    We cover all the external skills to improve your pitch acceptance rate, and the internal mindset work to keep you from getting in your own way.
    Click here to apply: www.FreelanceWriterBootcamp.com
    More info and complete show notes: www.rebeccalweber.com/podcast162

    • 19 min
    WCP161 Neediness cycle

    WCP161 Neediness cycle

    Neediness has been normalized in much of freelance culture, to our own detriment. Desperation compounds difficult situations by blocking our own resourcefulness. Even when desperation fuels our actions, it’s not energy that’s sustainable long term.
    Without defining neediness as a so-called negative frame of mind that needs (!) to be replaced with a “positive” one, today we look at thoughts and feelings that are more useful for getting the outcomes we want and enjoying our writing lives along the way.
    MENTIONED ON TODAY’S EPISODE
    WCP 56: Playing it safe
    WORK WITH ME
    Apply for the next session of my small group coaching program, Freelance Writer Bootcamp.
    Break into your dream publications and get paid well while covering stories that matter. 
    Bootcamp alumni have used these proven pitching processes to break into the New York Times, the Guardian, Bustle, Fodor’s, Condé Nast Traveler, Al Jazeera, the BBC, and many more.
    We cover all the external skills to improve your pitch acceptance rate, and the internal mindset work to keep you from getting in your own way.
    Let’s get started: www.FreelanceWriterBootcamp.com
    More info and complete show notes: www.rebeccalweber.com/podcast161

    • 18 min
    WCP160 Setting freelance writing goals, Vol. VI: 5W1H goal setting

    WCP160 Setting freelance writing goals, Vol. VI: 5W1H goal setting

    The fundamental 5W1H questions you use when reporting are just as handy for examining your freelance life. 
    When it comes to setting writing goals, WHO will you become in the process of achieving your goal?
    Is your goal setting process setting you up for success? Have you chosen goals that are distracting you from the writing you really want to be doing? Or are you holding unmet goals against yourself?
    Some writers have such a hard time believing that they’re good at setting at achieving goals, that even when it’s accomplished, they downplay the achievement or forget there was any struggle.
    Today we’ll look at some common pitfalls writers run into when setting and working on goals, including:
    “I’ll have what she’s having” goals: You’re not really sure what you want, but see that somebody else seems to be happy with having set or achieved a goal, so you set that for your goal too.
    Celebrity crush goals: You’ve put a publication, niche, or story on a pedestal so high that you’re not realistically pursuing it.
    Goal timeframe issue: You’ve set a goal, pursued it, and then think “I’m not going to make it in time” and slow down or stop.
    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE …
    WCP 20: Setting freelance writer goals
    WCP 32: Setting freelance writer goals, Vol. II
    WCP 45: Setting freelance writer goals, Volume III
    WCP 59: Setting freelance writer goals, Vol. IV
    WCP 97: Setting freelance writer goals, Vol. V
    WCP 119 I want to, I want to not
    WCP 1: What’s your problem?
    JOIN ME FOR THE ALL-NEW 5W1H GOAL SETTING WORKSHOP 
    On January 10, I’m leading an all-new 5W1H goal setting workshop, exclusively for members of Freelance Writer Bootcamp. Register today for 2022 Bootcamp, and join us for this special opportunity to get coached live on your goals. It’s the perfect pre-work for Bootcamp.
    Apply today: www.FreelanceWriterBootcamp.com
    APPLY FOR FREELANCE WRITER BOOTCAMP
    Break into your dream publications and get paid well while covering stories that matter. 
    Bootcamp alumni have used these proven pitching processes to break into the New York Times, the Guardian, Bustle, Fodor’s, Condé Nast Traveler, Al Jazeera, the BBC, and many more.
    We cover all the external skills to improve your pitch acceptance rate, and the internal mindset work to keep you from getting in your own way.
    Let’s get started: www.FreelanceWriterBootcamp.com
    More info and complete show notes: www.rebeccalweber.com/podcast160

    • 19 min
    WCP159 Resolutions, experiments, and followups

    WCP159 Resolutions, experiments, and followups

    When it comes to making lasting changes in your freelance life, I’m more a fan of experiments than of resolutions. The latter tend not to work so well, often relying on willpower or self-shame as fuel to get things done. Some industries have business models based on these negative, dysfunctional cycles, and you don’t want to rope your own freelancing in with them.
    Alternatively, setting up a framework of experimentation conjures curiosity and exploration. For decisions to stick long-term, this is much more pleasant and productive.
    Following up is something that many freelance writers don’t do on a regular basis. It’s neither sexy nor exciting, but it is super effective as a simple method to boost your query acceptance rate, streamline planning by getting people to commit to dates and times, and it replaces doubt with confidence when it comes to decision-making about next steps.
    You can follow up on pitches sent to editors, requests to sources for interviews, late payments, letters of introduction, filing stories, and pretty much any other time when you need to hear back from a person to take your next step, or generally want to remind them that you exist.
    Two distinct and extremely supportive patterns emerge with regular, systematic followups:
    1 - People tend to respond quickly to the follow up, even if they ignore the initial contact.
    2 - Scheduling the follow-ups minimizes emotions and taking things personally. 
    Listen to this week’s episode on the protocol of how to follow up (that’s the external business skill), and the mindset adjustments necessary to get yourself to do it with ease all year long (that’s the internal thought work).
    YOU MIGHT ALSO ENJOY …
    WCP 1: What’s your (writing) problem?
    WCP 123: Why you don’t follow up
    WCP 153 Archives: Pay me now!
    Free guide on how to pitch
    WORK WITH ME IN FREELANCE WRITER BOOTCAMP
    Apply for my small group coaching program, Freelance Writer Bootcamp. Break into your dream publications and get paid well while covering stories that matter. 
    We cover all the external skills to improve your pitch acceptance rate, and the internal mindset work to keep you from getting in your own way.
    Bootcamp alumni have used these proven pitching processes to break into the New York Times, the Guardian, Bustle, Fodor’s, Condé Nast Traveler, Al Jazeera, the BBC, and many more.
    Click here to apply to work with me in 2022: www.FreelanceWriterBootcamp.com
    Follow me on Instagram: @FreelanceWriterBootcamp
    More info and complete show notes: www.rebeccalweber.com/podcast158

    • 20 min
    WCP158 Archives, Vol. IX: Urgency

    WCP158 Archives, Vol. IX: Urgency

    Freelance writers often conflate two very different kinds of urgency. Confusing them impacts pitching and following up.
    First is the urgency of the story itself. This includes identifying why the story needs to be told now. It can be any kind of news peg or timely aspect that compels the editor to assign and publish the piece, and the reader to prioritize reading it.
    Second is our own personal/professional sense of urgency. This can be when you’re telling yourself that you need to place a piece ASAP, and are operating from anxiety or panic in a way that leads to poor decision making.
    Note that you might have a strong desire to place a piece with a short shelf life, and that it’s possible to do this while feeling focused, curious, confident, or calm.
    When it comes to following up on a story pitch, you want to know the difference between a story that needs to be told urgently (in this case, you’ll want to follow up sooner than normal) and your own urgent need to line up your next assignment.
    YOU MIGHT ALSO ENJOY …
    WCP 102 Mother tongue
    WCP 62 PITA Clients
    WCP 89 Annoying pitches
    WCP 1 What’s your problem?
    Download my free guide on how to pitch
    LET’S WORK TOGETHER
    Break into your dream publications. Earn more money. Cover stories that matter.
    In my small group coaching program, you’ll learn the same proven processes that have helped Bootcamp alumni break into the New York Times, the Guardian, Bustle, Nat Geo Travel, the BBC, Outside, and many more.
    Apply today for the next session of Freelance Writer Bootcamp: www.FreelanceWriterBootcamp.com

    • 18 min

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