55 episodes

This collection of videos showcases the diverse and cutting-edge research being translated at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. By emulating Nature's principles for self-organizing and self-regulating, Wyss researchers are developing innovative new engineering solutions for healthcare, energy, architecture, robotics, and manufacturing. These technologies are translated into commercial products and therapies through collaborations with clinical investigator’s, corporate alliances, and new start-ups.

Wyss: Looking to Nature for Inspiration Harvard University

    • Technology

This collection of videos showcases the diverse and cutting-edge research being translated at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. By emulating Nature's principles for self-organizing and self-regulating, Wyss researchers are developing innovative new engineering solutions for healthcare, energy, architecture, robotics, and manufacturing. These technologies are translated into commercial products and therapies through collaborations with clinical investigator’s, corporate alliances, and new start-ups.

    • video
    3D Printing Metal in Midair

    3D Printing Metal in Midair

    In this video, see the laser-assisted method developed by Wyss Core Faculty member Jennifer Lewis that allows metal to be 3D printed in midair. Credit: Lewis Lab / Wyss Institute at Harvard University

    For more information, please visit wyss.harvard.edu/viewpressrelease/257

    • 1 min
    • video
    Meet Root: The Robot that Brings Code to Life

    Meet Root: The Robot that Brings Code to Life

    Computational thinking and programming underlie the digital world around us – yet K-16 teachers have been challenged to find the right teaching tool to instill coding and programming skills in beginners of a wide age range. Recognizing the pressing need for young students to be digitally literate and the remarkable educational power of robots, a team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering has developed Root, a coding robot that will engage students at an early age and guide the growth of their coding skills. By programming Root through exciting activities and games, today’s coding students will be tomorrow’s digital innovators.

    For more information, please visit: http://wyss.harvard.edu/viewpage/629

    • 3 min
    • video
    Printing Vascular Tissue

    Printing Vascular Tissue

    Printing vessel vasculature is essential for sustaining functional living tissues. Until now, bioengineers have had difficulty building thick tissues, lacking a method to embed vascular networks.

    A 3D bioprinting method invented at the Wyss Institute and Harvard SEAS embeds a grid of vasculature into thick tissue laden with human stem cells and connective matrix. Printed within a custom-made housing, this method can be used to create tissue of any shape.

    Once printed, an inlet and outlet own opposite ends are perfused with fluids, nutrients, and cell growth factors, which control stem cell differentiation and sustain cell functions. By flowing growth factors through the vasculature, stem cells can be differentiated into a variety of tissue cell types.

    This vascularized 3D printing process could open new doors to tissue replacement and engineering.

    Footage credit: David Kolesky, Lori Sanders, and Jennifer Lewis

    For more information, please visit: http://wyss.harvard.edu/viewpressrelease/250/

    • 1 min
    • video
    4D Printing: Shapeshifting Architecture

    4D Printing: Shapeshifting Architecture

    A team at the Wyss Institute and Harvard SEAS has developed a new microscale printing method to create transformable objects. These "4D-printed" objects go a step beyond 3D printing to incorporate a fourth dimension–time.

    The method was inspired by the way plants change shape over time in response to environmental stimuli. This orchid-shaped structure is printed with a hydrogel composite ink containing aligned cellulose fibrils, which enable anisotropic swelling. A proprietary mathematical model developed by the team precisely predicts how the fibrils will swell in water.

    After printing, the 4D orchid is immersed in water to activate its shape transformation.

    Credit: A.S. Gladman, E. Matsumoto, L.K. Sanders, and J.A. Lewis / Wyss Institute at Harvard University

    For more information, please visit: http://wyss.harvard.edu/viewpressrelease/239

    • 1 min
    • video
    Soft Robotic Grippers for Deep-Sea Exploration

    Soft Robotic Grippers for Deep-Sea Exploration

    In this video, two types of soft robotic grippers are shown successfully collecting coral samples at the bottom of the Red Sea. The first gripper features opposing pairs of bending actuators, while the second gripper - inspired by the coiling action of a boa constrictor - can access tight spaces and clutch small and irregular shaped objects. The grippers were developed by Wyss Core Faculty member Robert Wood and Wyss Mechanical Engineer Kevin Galloway in collaboration with researchers from Baruch College, CUNY, and University of Rhode Island. For more information, please visit: http://wyss.harvard.edu/viewpressrelease/238/

    • 1 min
    • video
    The Wyss Institute: A Technology Revolution

    The Wyss Institute: A Technology Revolution

    There is a technology revolution – a revolution inspired by nature, built upon collaboration, self-assembly and disruptive innovation.

    The Wyss Institute is crossing boundaries and disrupting the status quo to pioneer new technologies, new devices, and new therapeutics that harness the power of life itself. There is a technology revolution and it is happening at the Wyss Institute.

    • 2 min

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