59 episodes

Welcome to the All Fired Up podcast, with your host Louise Adams!

Louise is by nature a mild mannered clinical psychologist, but her alter ego – a FIERCE and fearless anti-diet crusader – is taking over! Louise specialises in helping people recover from disordered eating, and she’s COMPLETELY OVER trying to help people when the culture we live in is utterly sick, toxic, and screwed up when it comes to food, exercise, health, and body size.

Louise cannot for a second longer take the rampant injustice of a society obsessed with thinness and health. She can’t STAND how fat people are being treated like second class citizens. She is LIVID about the way weight science is being sold to make a buck off human misery.

And she’s SO OVER the diet bulls**t that she’s shelved her own introversion and started a podcast!

So welcome to All Fired Up!, where Louise delves deeply into diet culture and blows it the hell up! Each week we’ll meet brave and fascinating anti-diet warriors who are also fighting for equality, justice, and freedom. Join us, and get All Fired Up! about building a better world!

All Fired Up Louise Adams

    • Alternative Health

Welcome to the All Fired Up podcast, with your host Louise Adams!

Louise is by nature a mild mannered clinical psychologist, but her alter ego – a FIERCE and fearless anti-diet crusader – is taking over! Louise specialises in helping people recover from disordered eating, and she’s COMPLETELY OVER trying to help people when the culture we live in is utterly sick, toxic, and screwed up when it comes to food, exercise, health, and body size.

Louise cannot for a second longer take the rampant injustice of a society obsessed with thinness and health. She can’t STAND how fat people are being treated like second class citizens. She is LIVID about the way weight science is being sold to make a buck off human misery.

And she’s SO OVER the diet bulls**t that she’s shelved her own introversion and started a podcast!

So welcome to All Fired Up!, where Louise delves deeply into diet culture and blows it the hell up! Each week we’ll meet brave and fascinating anti-diet warriors who are also fighting for equality, justice, and freedom. Join us, and get All Fired Up! about building a better world!

    The Game Changers

    The Game Changers

    All Fired Up is back with a BANG for 2020! And we are SUPER fired up about this Netflix SHOCKumentary ‘The Game Changers’. Ebony McCorkell of EB Nutrition joins me to shout “WTF?” at the dude-bro-fear-mongering- pseudo-scientific thrust of this plant-based propaganda. As an ethical vegan and anti-diet dietitian, Ebony is NOT IMPRESSED with the doco's misleading oversimplification of nutrition science, and we’re both just flat out BEWILDERED at the relentless focus on masculinity (and erect penises!). It’s infuriating that thin white male doctors are apparently able to say ANYTHING without giving credible evidence to support their claims. If you’re tangled up in health knots after watching this doco, this is a must listen!
     
     
    Show Notes
     

          My guest is dietitian and chef Ebony McCorkell of EB Nutrition, and we’re talking about the Netflix documentary ‘The Game Changers’ (2018).       We’re back for our 2020 season, and this week we’re All Fired Up about SOCK-umentaries! There’s been a string of documentaries in recent years that glorify one particular way of eating while demonizing others. ‘The Paleo Way’, ‘The Sugar Film’ … ‘The Game Changers’ is the newest documentary in this vein, and Louise is seeing more and more clients coming in who have been all shook up by it. The documentary upholds a plant-based diet (or actually, veganism) as the be-all-and-end-all way to eat for hotness, athleticism, and not dying from terrible health problems. It’s got all the classic ingredients – raising fear, and condemning other styles of eating (such as eating meat).       Because ‘The Game Changers’ goes into the science of food and how it affects our bodies, Louise wanted to talk to a professional who works with food. This week’s guest is Ebony McCorkell, who not only is an Accredited Practicing Dietitian and chef (yum!), she’s also a long-term ethical vegan.       As a dietitian and a vegan, Ebony is fired up about ‘The Game Changers’ and the perceived benefits of eating a vegan diet that the documentary espouses. You’d think she’d be cheering for a documentary promoting vegan diets, no? No! The documentary makes far-reaching claims and doesn’t hit the mark on ‘good vegan information’.       Louise has seen in her clients, many of whom have an eating disorder background, just how much doubt watching a documentary like ‘the Game Changers’ can sow – even if they’ve been working on HAES ® and the non-diet approach for a long time. It speaks to how convincing this documentary seems.       Ebony has also had clients coming in telling her to watch it – just like when the previous vegan propaganda film ‘What the Health’ (2017) came out.       A successful documentary has to be thrilling, and unfortunately anyone who has done a nutrition degree can tell you that nutrition is not thrilling!       We both resisted watching the documentary for as long as we could, and when we did watch it, we came away really understanding why our clients are freaking out. The message throughout the documentary is that eating meat is very bad for your health and will kill you.       Using scientific terms and words a layperson might not understand helps to build fear, and also makes the documentary makers and the people they’re interviewing seem more intelligent if they’re talking about all the science without explaining what it means. The black and white ideas of ‘this is bad, this is good’ – anyone who has done a nutrition degree knows that nothing is as simple as ‘bad’ and ‘good’.       The opening sequence with documentary filmmaker James Wilkes bragging about how ‘deadly’ he is, is such a strange opening to a nutrition film – the hyper-masculinity and adrenaline gives a real feeling of ‘I’m in danger’.  

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Why Diet Culture Sucks With Christy Harrison

    Why Diet Culture Sucks With Christy Harrison

    My guest this week is Christy Harrison, intuitive eating coach, anti-diet dietitian, and host of the amazing Food Psych podcast. She is COMPLETELY fired up about diet culture and all of the harm it perpetuates. In fact she’s so pissed about it, she wrote a book! “Anti-Diet” has just come out!

    • 1 hr 14 min
    Quitting I Quit Sugar

    Quitting I Quit Sugar

    Nothing winds up my anti-diet nutritionist guest Tara Leong more than the influencer-led anti-sugar movement. She is in FITS of rage - to the point of goosebumps - about the mountains of misinformation being spread as liberally as nut butter. She’s LIVID about harm being done to innocent people who are being told that they’ll risk giving their kids cancer if they eat bananas. She is OUTRAGED by the misleading tactics being used by these for-profit companies who aren’t able to print the truth on their nutrition labels. She is f***ed off about fructose. And don’t even get her STARTED on the fruit pyramid! Join us for a much needed discussion about the anti-sugar movement, Tara’s attempts to reach out to Australia’s anti-sugar guru Sarah Wilson, and Sarah’s foray into mental health advice. This is one hell of a conversation!
     
     
    ShowNotes

    My guest is Tara Leong from The Nutritionist & The Chef, and she is fired up to the point of GOOSEBUMPS about the influencer-lead I Quit Sugar (IQS) trend! Sugar is definitely public enemy #1 right now, and this global sense of fear is impacting everyone, from all ages and all walks of life. We’ve seen various foods demonised over the years, from fats, to carbs, and now sugars. And leaders of these food fad movements have historically been weight loss gurus or medical professionals. But the anti-sugar trend seems to be dominated by “influencers” spruiking their lifestyle brands. There have been some medical professionals - like Dr Lustig who loves to crow about sugar. But in Australia, the shiny beautiful people, like Sarah Wilson, are really heading up the anti sugar movement. Tara commends Sarah for raising awareness about how we can take care of our bodies, but the messages put out via her “I Quit Sugar” social media channels and in the book “I Quit Sugar” are not based on science and are destructive, especially with regards to the impact these messages have on people’s relationship with food. The whole Sarah Wilson/“I Quit Sugar” phenomenon traces back to 2011. Sarah is a journalist and was the ex editor of Cosmopolitan magazine, back then she was a judge on the first season of Masterchef. After that she moved to Byron Bay and began to freelance, writing articles for newspapers. She literally didn’t have a topic for an article one week, and had read David Gillespie’s “Sweet Poison” book (Gillespie is a lawyer). So she did an experiment quitting sugar, wrote about it, and the “I Quit Sugar” machine was born. She started to sell e-books and from there it became a massive empire. She caught the Zeitgeist - just at the start of the anti-sugar climate. Plus, she’s pretty and can write well, and is well connected. This also came at the tail end of the low-fat movement, when research began to recognise that fat wasn’t actually a villain - so we needed a new villain. Enter sugar! Wellness industry 101: 1. Find the villain, 2. Find very vague modern health symptoms like ‘brain fog’ or ‘bloating’, and blame this on the villain, 3. Use your own vague health symptoms to glowing health story as ‘proof’, 4. Sell people a rule-based program to rid themselves of aforementioned villain. I Quit Sugar (IQS) requires people to stop eating any added sugars for 8 weeks. This was beautifully skewered on “The Katering Show”, 2 comedians with a parody cooking show who did a great job of showing, through comedy, just how awful it is to quit sugar. Modern influencers are using this tactic of telling their own stories, of sharing their own tales of ‘recovery’ from vague health symptoms, to sell their ideas. Influencers use their humanity, their accessibility, they are friendly and you feel like you know them. Whereas health professionals are discouraged from sharing their own stories with clients as it is not seens as ‘professional’, es

    • 1 hr 9 min
    Fat Representation on Stage & Screen With Kelli Jean Drinkwater

    Fat Representation on Stage & Screen With Kelli Jean Drinkwater

    My guest this week is the incredible film maker, speaker & activist Kelli Jean Drinkwater, and she has a huge fire in her belly about how fat people are represented onstage! Fat people have been virtually invisible in the creative arts, but Kelli Jean’s mission is to bring them into the limelight! In order to combat weight stigma and create a world in which all bodies belong, it is VITAL that fat people are represented in the creative arts. And not just as a boring STEREOTYPE, but as fully rounded, amazing, positive and UNAPOLOGETIC humans! Join me for a fantastic conversation as Kelli Jean & I unpack how things are changing in the industry & what still needs to be challenged. And hear all about Kelli Jeans’ simply INCREDIBLE projects! This is a fabulous & inspiring episode from an artist who professionally BLOWS PEOPLE’S MINDS!
     
     
    Shownotes

     
    My guest is Sydney based film maker, speaker and activist Kelli Jean Drinkwater, who is totally fired up about fat representation in the media. Louise talks about how she & Kelli Jean first met several years ago on the set of Insight, a tv program in which there was an ‘ambush’ of fat activists and Kelli Jean was in the front line of host Jenny Brockie’s fatphobia. Her anger acts as fuel to change how fat people are being represented. We can get fired up in 2 ways, because although on one hand representation and casting of fat characters are getting better, there’s still a long way to go! There’s been a recent spate of films and tv shows especially in the USA which feature fat narratives, but they are still centred around cis gendered, white, heterosexual perspectives, and also the smaller side of fat people being cast. We have stories like Shrill, where the character is fat and staying fat, and Dietland, adapted from the amazing novel by Sarai Walker, where it’s still very good & fat positive but still some decisions made in that process which reflect weight bias. Like in both Shrill & in Dietland the main fat characters had love interests or sexual partners that were just awful men! In Shrill, her love interest feels ashamed of her and makes her leave out of the back door. She’s meant to be this onto it fat woman and wh???? So eventually he comes around and says ok meet my friends, and she doesn’t dump him. And in Dietland the main character is a virgin, and rather than having a good experience she has this awful experience with a fetishist and a feeder who then rapes her. And it’s like - “ok, so that’s the kind of sex we’re going to see?” It could be done differently, and that’s frustrating. And then there’s the movie “Dumplin”, which Louise liked, she never saw anything like that when she was growing up. And it’s lovely to see the thin character (the mum, Jennifer Aniston), as the one always dieting, miserable and insecure. There’s some great characters in this - the fat auntie, who is always supportive of her. But then the aunt dies, and we’re not told why but it’s implied it’s because she was fat!? The love interest in Dumplin was great, he’s the hot guy and he is also lovely, he has no qualms about being attracted to her, and they just get together and it’s all ok. This is a narrative we need to see. Love is possible no matter what you look like. The hot guy can want to be with the fat girl. Kelli Jean related to her love of Dolly Parton, and the camp friends! Also the swimsuit scene at the end - they were in swing dresses and not bikinis??? There are things like that that we’re still not seeing, and Kelli Jean is keen as a film maker to push things further, to include more inclusivity and positivity to fat characters. Having a fat character in a story is not good enough, we need to see it handled properly. Kelli Jean’s first documentary was Aquaporko, all about the fat women’s synchronised swimming team that

    • 55 min
    The Push Up Challenge

    The Push Up Challenge

    This week my guest is the fierce and wonderful president of HAES Australia, Dr Carolynne White! A Facebook post from Headspace in Hervey Bay fired her (and many others) up when it claimed that eating sugary food causes mental health problems! As a mental health expert and anti-diet advocate, Carolynne knows how much this kind of messaging oversimplifies, stigmatises, and downright does damage. The fact that the SUGAR IS EVIL message is being spruiked by one of Australia’s leading adolescent mental health organisations is a worry. Particularly when it’s part of “The Push Up Challenge”, a fund raiser for Headspace which raises awareness about youth suicide by forcing people to do over a hundred push ups a day. Has anyone at Headspace heard of eating disorders? Why is encouraging excessive exercise in teens ok? Do they know how hung up young people are about body image and health? WHAT ON EARTH ARE THEY THINKING!?
    Join us as we rant about this extremely ill advised campaign. The truth is, mental health and physical health just can’t be separated, and we need to be doing a lot more critical thinking to avoid doing harm! CW: Discussions about suicide, mental illness & eating disorders.
     
     
    Show Notes
     
     

    My guest this week is Dr Carolynne White, occupational therapist and health promotion lecturer. Through her professional experience and her PhD research, Carolynne has formed the strong opinion that good mental health is absolutely necessary to support good overall health. Carolynne is also the president of HAES Australia.
    Carolynne got all fired up about a facebook post from Headspace at Hervey Bay in Queensland, about a ‘push up challenge’ to raise awareness about suicide and to raise money for Headspace. Headspace is a very well funded network of mental health treatment centres for adolescents and young people. Headspace enjoy a lot of government funding here in Australia, and also gather a lot of attention in the media. Their Mission is ‘to provide tailored and holistic mental health support to young people aged 12-25”. They focus on early intervention and prevention of mental illness, as well as focusing on physical health as well. According to the website, the ‘push up challenge’ was started by a ‘bunch of mates’ passionate about the topic. The challenge involves doing 3128 push ups over the month of August - one for each life lost to suicide in 2017. This is a LOT of push ups - over 100 a day. Louise’s first thought - why are headspace supporting an initiative that uses the symptoms of a major mental illness - ie the compulsive exercise aspects of an eating disorder - to raise awareness of mental illness? It just seems very ill advised. Particularly when you consider that eating disorder have the highest mortality rate, particularly from suicide, among young people. The man who started the push up challenge is Nick Hudson, he’s from Perth. He’s a white Aussie bloke in his thirties. Louise found 2 media articles about him which said slightly different things. One said he had heart surgery as a child, and when he got older his fitness declined and he realised he needed more heart surgery. This made him depressed, and one of the ways he came out of the depression was to start this push up challenge. But then another news article which came out about the same time (and was accompanied by a truly awful ‘Fitspo on steroids’ picture) said that his father had suffered from depression for many years but had never told him. When he discovered the depression, he ‘did some research’  on mental health. Then he and his mates, who do push ups as part of their regular fitness regime, decided to turn it into something more. So it’s odd to have 2 such different stories out there in the media, normally people have just one story, but there you go. There is a level of privilege reflect

    • 54 min
    Inside The Obesity Collective

    Inside The Obesity Collective

    DO NOT MISS this explosive episode of All Fired Up! The Obesity Collective is a sparkly new organisation gaining attention nationwide for its ostensibly ‘collaborative’ approach to ‘tackling’ obesity, whilst simultaneously erasing weight stigma (oh please how much of a mindboggle is that?!). But who are they really? My guest this week is Mandy-Lee Noble, anti-diet dietitian from Nourished Approach in Brisbane, and she has had a GUTFUL of industry interests penetrating our health narrative. Once we dug a little deeper into The Obesity Collective we found that the tentacles of Big Pharma have a firm hold on the goolies of all our so-called ‘independent’ Obesity organisations. You won’t believe how deep this goes. Next time you read a hysterical news headline highlighting the terrors of Obesity Epidemic, know who funded it!
     
     
    ShowNotes
     

     
    Content warning and Apology !! This episode contains multiple uses of the word ‘obesity’. This is a stigmatising term and not one I nor my guest Mandy Lee Noble are comfortable using. However, as the topic of this episode is all about an organisation called The Obesity Collective, there are a lot of “O” words used. There are also lots of swear words to make up for it! My guest, dietitian Mandy-Lee Noble is all fired up about conflicts of interest and vested interests in health care, and within weight centric research and industries in particular. Mandy & Louise fell down a massive rabbithole when they accidentally stumbled across a particularly troubling example of this, the subject of today’s podcast. During a HAES Australia leadership meeting, we came across the “Obesity Australia” website, and their “fact sheets” were rather hilarious. These fact sheets contained not just outdated, but frankly very bizarre advice regarding weight loss. “Obesity Australia” are ostensibly one of Australia’s leading ‘authorities’ on obesity, and many of the country’s leading researchers, practitioners etc, are involved. And yet the fact sheets look like they were thrown together by either a year 9 school boy or an elderly person with very little connection to the real world. One of the ‘fact’ sheets was about drinks you should be having to lose weight, written by former head of Obesity Australia John Funder, whose diet tips have come directly from 1935. He recommends “egg flips” and “Miss Muffett’s favourite tipple, curds and whey”. Does ANYONE know what an egg flip is? And what about curds and whey?? He then goes on to rage against fish and chips, and goes on a bizarre rant telling us to strip the fish and chips of batter, and ‘put it amongst the pickled onion’. What is he even talking about here? Where did the pickled onion even come from? 1970? John also has a huge grudge against potato crisps, which he says are ‘lethal’. Now Mandy, being a bit of a rebel, has on several occasions since reading that thrown caution to the wind and deliberately and vigorously eaten said lethal crisps, and has lived to tell the tale. Another tip was to ‘drink coke zero’, to ‘fool yourself into eating slightly less’. This tip appears to have come from Weight Watchers in circa 1980. Mandy believes this may work through the process of being forced to eat slightly less because you have no teeth! Seriously what’s with the totally S**T advice here? This is from a highly regarded and very knowledgeable researcher? It’s encouraging behaviours that overall are not hugely health supportive, all in the name of weight loss! John also ‘recommends’ that a ‘rule of thumb’ is to always weigh the same as you did at the age of 25, even if we have less bone and muscle mass as a result. All of the actual research would contest that: there is a plethora of evidence to show that as we age we do get heavier, and preserving muscle mass as we age is ve

    • 1 hr 14 min

Customer Reviews

Denis_Ark ,

This is good!

As a health professional, it is very interesting, and surprising to hear how unqualified people are leading movements in the health field, and as a mother who has been around other mums and their judgements on food, I am relieved to hear sugar isn’t that bad after all. I might go bake some cookies!

ThriveNut ,

Dismantling diet culture one episode at a time.

I love it! Louise is so insightful and compassionate. This podcast has really opened my eyes as to how pervasive diet culture is, and it brings me joy to hear Louise and guests rip it a new one.

freya bur 18 ,

Love it

Love it but the sound quality in some episodes is not great and somewhat ruins it for me maybe would be worth investing in a microphone? Keep spreading your messenge much love x

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