198 episodes

From affordable housing to disaster recovery, from climate resilience to autonomous vehicles, APA's podcast delves into a wide array of urban planning topics with deep curiosity, expert analysis, and affecting, true-life stories.

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    • Education

From affordable housing to disaster recovery, from climate resilience to autonomous vehicles, APA's podcast delves into a wide array of urban planning topics with deep curiosity, expert analysis, and affecting, true-life stories.

    Planning as Caring, Managing Large-Scale Solar, Becoming an Effective Manager, and More

    Planning as Caring, Managing Large-Scale Solar, Becoming an Effective Manager, and More

    In this episode of the podcast series Cover to Cover, the Planning magazine editors review the contents of the March 2020 issue: from an interactive map from the US Department of Transportation that shows the linkages between transportation and the new Federal Opportunity Zones program, to the steps it takes to prepare a community for large-scale solar development, to a special "business of planning" article, with 13 strategies for becoming an effective manager. Before the editors dive in to their discussion, editor-in-chief Meghan Stromberg reflects on the state of the world amid of the COVID-19 pandemic. This lens casts a new, even-more-pressing light on her discussion with Ward Lyles, AICP, and Stacey Swearingen White, about their research into emotions in planning. Swearingen White is a professor at the University of Kansas, as well as the director of the School of Public Affairs and Administration, and Lyles is an associate professor at the university, in the School of Public Affairs and Administration. He also serves as director of the Center for Compassionate and Sustainable Communities at KU. The three explore the trope of "planner as technician" and how bringing emotional intelligence into planning can have a major impact on how planners work — something that matters now more than ever in the wake of our current public health crisis.

    • 33 min
    Rezoning East Harlem, Rethinking One-Size-Fits-All Public Engagement

    Rezoning East Harlem, Rethinking One-Size-Fits-All Public Engagement

    In this episode of People Behind the Plans, host Courtney Kashima, AICP, catches up with Traci Sanders of WXY Studio in New York. Traci serves as the director of civic impact for the multidisciplinary architecture, design, and planning firm. She and Courtney start off by exploring how Traci discovered the field of urban planning — the seed was planted during high school, when she split her time between the South and North Sides of Chicago and noticed the stark inequities between them. Traci describes how her work trajectory changed after graduating from NYU Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, eventually leading her to a job with New York City Councilmember Melissa Mark-Viverito and involvement in the East Harlem Neighborhood Plan. Both Traci and Courtney share their thoughts on how certain urban planning spheres view public versus private backgrounds, and they muse on issues like the public dimension of design and why a community engagement process should be tailored to every client.

    • 56 min
    Uncovering Transit's Gender Gap, Preserving Texas Freedom Colonies, and More

    Uncovering Transit's Gender Gap, Preserving Texas Freedom Colonies, and More

    In this episode of the APA Podcast, the Planning magazine editors sit down to recap the urban planning trends and ideas from the February 2020 issue. Featured topics this month include public transit's gender gap (and how to close it), the Texas Freedom Colonies Project, user-centered planning, and the rise of nighttime mayors.

    • 24 min
    Long-Term Disaster Recovery Planning in Florida

    Long-Term Disaster Recovery Planning in Florida

    In this episode of the Resilience Roundtable podcast series, host Jim Schwab, FAICP, speaks with Julie Dennis of OVID Solutions about her experiences working as both an independent disaster-recovery consultant and as a previous director of community development for the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity. Julie's vast experience in Florida saw her working in the Florida Keys when Hurricane Irma hit; she says that the department's focus on relationship building in the region helped enormously to lay the groundwork for assisting post-disaster and guiding redevelopment. The conversation shifts into the personal when Julie shares her experiences with Hurricane Michael, which destroyed her parents' and other family members' homes in another part of the state: the Florida Panhandle. Listeners hear not just about the harsh reality of surviving in a post-disaster environment but also about the moving displays of cooperation that Julie witnessed again and again after the event. Julie and Jim discuss the work she's focusing on now, including guiding some communities in the Panhandle in their first-time planning work. Throughout the episode, Julie shares invaluable insights from working in a state that's on the nation's frontlines of disaster-recovery planning.

    • 55 min
    CMAP Executive Director Erin Aleman: Making Change Is Relationship Building

    CMAP Executive Director Erin Aleman: Making Change Is Relationship Building

    This episode of the People Behind the Plans podcast series introduces listeners to CMAP executive director Erin Aleman, the first woman and first planner to head up the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning. Erin knows about the challenges inherent in working in large jurisdictions, but she’s learned from her work that small actions can have a big impact. She and host Courtney Kashima, AICP, get into the nitty-gritty of urban planning: how CMAP’s local technical assistance (LTA) program came to be and how it focuses not just on transportation but also housing; how the organization's On to 2050 Plan revolves around three core principles: inclusive growth, resilience, and prioritized investment. They zoom out from talking about the technicalities of planning to explore how an influential college experience taught Erin to approach all residents from a place of respect — a lesson she carries with her even today.

    • 34 min
    Resiliency Efforts and Planning Without Zoning in Houston, Gender Mainstreaming Preview, and More | Cover to Cover

    Resiliency Efforts and Planning Without Zoning in Houston, Gender Mainstreaming Preview, and More | Cover to Cover

    Welcome to Cover to Cover, a new series giving planners an insider look into the stories in APA’s Planning magazine. Each month editor Meghan Stromberg and associate editors Mary Hammon and Lindsay Nieman dive deeper into the topics covered in Planning. They introduce listeners to some of the contributors and other voices in its pages, talk about how it all came together, and otherwise give us the story behind the story. This month’s episode focuses on all things planning in Houston: increased resiliency efforts following Hurricane Harvey, a major transit bond measure, a new innovation corridor, and more. Planning writer Bill Fulton, director of the Kinder Institute for Urban Research at Rice University in Houston, weighs in on H-Town’s famous lack of zoning — he argues that the city still uses important planning tools in guiding development. The editors also provide a preview of the upcoming February issue, including articles on gender mainstreaming and the rise of “night mayors.”

    • 28 min

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