18 episodes

The poetry of World War One has been some of the most important and influential work of the twentieth century. It has shaped our attitudes to war, and has remained ingrained in British cultural consciousness. In this collection world-leading experts revisit this important body of work to provide deeper insights into some of the most read British soldier poets, as well as providing new perspectives and introductions to a more expansive canon.

This series was produced as part of the Faculty of English Spring School (3-5 April 2014) and is aimed at members of the public, particularly those who have read some World War One poetry and are now seeking a deeper critical appreciation.

"British" World War One Poetry: An Introduction Oxford University

    • Courses

The poetry of World War One has been some of the most important and influential work of the twentieth century. It has shaped our attitudes to war, and has remained ingrained in British cultural consciousness. In this collection world-leading experts revisit this important body of work to provide deeper insights into some of the most read British soldier poets, as well as providing new perspectives and introductions to a more expansive canon.

This series was produced as part of the Faculty of English Spring School (3-5 April 2014) and is aimed at members of the public, particularly those who have read some World War One poetry and are now seeking a deeper critical appreciation.

    War Poetry

    War Poetry

    Dr Mark Rawlinson explores the relationship between War and War Poetry using Owen's famous 'Preface' as the starting point. Dr Mark Rawlinson is a Reader in English Literature at the University of Leicester, working on nineteenth- and twentieth century literature, especially narrative fiction and poetry. His research has a particular focus on the literature of war. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 47 min
    The Early Poets

    The Early Poets

    Dr Alisa Miller looks at the popular poets in the early years of the War and the way that the press and publishing worlds created a commercial culture in support of the conflict. Alisa Miller is Research Fellow at the University of Chichester. Her work is concerned with how individuals understand and reconcile war as both a private and a public experience, and the cultural artifacts that they create in order to explain and contextualise extraordinary experience of violence. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 48 min
    Georgians and Others

    Georgians and Others

    Dr Stuart Lee gives a short introduction to the poetry movements that led up to the War. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 17 min
    Poetry vs. History

    Poetry vs. History

    What place do the poets and their work have in the historical analysis of the War? Dr Stuart Lee takes a look at the debate. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 15 min
    Women Poets

    Women Poets

    Dr Jane Potter looks at a range of women poets who wrote during, and in the years that followed, World War One. Dr Jane Potter's research and teaching focuses on book and literary history. Her monograph Boys in Khaki, Girls in Print: Women's Literary Responses to the Great War 1914-1918 (OUP 2005; paperback 2007) was joint winner of the 2006 Women’s History Network Book Prize and she has published widely on many aspects of war literature, book history, and women's writing. She is a trustee of the Wilfred Owen Literary Estate. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 40 min
    ‘On your lips my life is hung’: Robert Graves and War

    ‘On your lips my life is hung’: Robert Graves and War

    Dr Charles Mundye takes a look at how Robert Graves' experiences and feelings about War that influenced his poetic career. Dr Charles Mundye is Head of Academic Development at the Department of Humanities, Sheffield Hallam University. He has research interests in British and American literature of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, and is President of the Robert Graves Society.
    Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 48 min

Top Podcasts In Courses

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by Oxford University