71 episodes

Enjoy the Vue is a Vue.js podcast bringing you panel discussions, guest interviews, and much more to keep you up to date on what's happening in the Vue and tech communities.

Enjoy the Vue The Enjoy the Vue Team

    • Technology

Enjoy the Vue is a Vue.js podcast bringing you panel discussions, guest interviews, and much more to keep you up to date on what's happening in the Vue and tech communities.

    Episode 71: Developer Advocacy from Nuxt to React with Debbie O’Brien

    Episode 71: Developer Advocacy from Nuxt to React with Debbie O’Brien

    Admin note: Hey everyone! Please give us some feedback with out listener survey here: Enjoy the Vue listener survey


    The role of developer advocate is a fairly new one and can therefore be difficult to define as it continues to evolve. In today’s episode, Alex, Tessa, and Ari get together with Debbie O’Brien, Head Developer Advocate at Bit, to discuss how she transitioned from being a developer to team leader to working as a developer advocate and she unpacks the elements that drew her to the role. Debbie shares her passionate take on KPIs as well as the lessons she learned from the book Surrounded by Idiots. We delve into the traits that make up a good developer advocate and discuss why there’s a need for companies to introduce the role of junior developer advocate. Later Debbie shares some of the learning challenges you’ll experience as a developer advocate and how she adapted to learning React under high-pressure circumstances. We end the show by hearing everybody’s picks, ranging from AI software and counterintuitive fruit gums to the world’s most expensive headphones. For all this and more, join us today! 


    Key Points From This Episode:



    Introducing today’s guest Debbie O'Brien.
    What it means to be a developer advocate and how the role has evolved.
    Why KPI analytics aren’t always useful.
    Debbie shares what drew her to developer advocacy.
    How Debbie went from developer to team leader to developer advocate.
    Debbie shares what she learned about leadership from Surrounded by Idiots.
    How developer advocacy can be a very time-consuming position.
    Why it can be difficult to determine whether you want to work in tech.
    Determining what kind of people you want to work with.
    How working in developer advocacy means you get to be at the forefront of new developments and technologies.
    Some of the concerns around developer advocacy’s ability to connect with and help developers.
    How Debbie’s company is helping companies migrate over from legacy stacks.
    Why empathy is as important as technical skills in development advocacy.
    Why the role of junior developer advocate is important for the industry and should be actively created and nurtured.
    Why writing a starter guide is a good job for a junior developer advocate.
    Why it’s difficult to get into developer advocacy.
    Debbie shares what it was like learning React under high-pressure circumstances.
    The type of learning challenges you will experience as a developer advocate.
    We hear this weeks' picks! Rowntree Fruit Gums, Elgato Stream Decks, GitHub CoPilot, and more!


    Tweetables:


    “Maybe the most successful model for a junior developer advocate program would be one at a company large enough that could have them do product rotations.” — @GloomyLumi [0:35:23]


    “I feel like KPIs are kind of, it's that classic criticism of measuring something because it's measurable, rather than measuring the things that you need to keep track of like, it's just quantitative data.” — Tessa [0:08:30]


    “I started thinking about what are the parts of my job that I love and what is the part of the job that I don't like, and then try and look at what kind of job fits the job that I love. And everything seemed to fit into developer advocate.” — @debs_obrien [0:40:54]


    “Having worked on small, medium, and large codebases, I know one of the big things that I think you need to keep in mind when you're doing developer advocacy is, ‘Okay, how do you integrate this with an already existing project?’” —@fimion [0:32:58]


    “There should probably be a starter role, maybe it's not a junior developer advocate, maybe it's like a content creator and then you kind of go up because you could be a very, very, very good content creator, and not necessarily be a developer advocate.” — @debs_obrien [0:35:50]


    Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:



    Surrounded by Idiots
    Deb

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Episode 70: 🍍The Pinia Colada Song with Eduardo San Martin Morote🍍

    Episode 70: 🍍The Pinia Colada Song with Eduardo San Martin Morote🍍

    Admin note: Hey everyone! Please give us some feedback with out listener survey here: Enjoy the Vue listener survey


    Key Points From This Episode:



    The panel's experience working with global data storage methods for Vue. 
    Some background information on pinia, Eduardo's store for Vue.
    What differentiates pinia from similar stores such as Vuex.
    Common mistakes that Eduardo has seen being made in Vuex.
    Why Eduardo felt it was necessary to create pinia instead of using the composition API. 
    The benefits of server-side rendering and routing; transparency and convenience. 
    Eduardo's own use of pinia and how he applies it in his work with clients. 
    Transitioning an experimental solo project into production and the mass market.
    Clearing up some confusion around the composing stores on pinia. 
    How Eduardo balances his workload, between projects and client work.
    This weeks' picks! Eurovision Song Contest, Overland, Shadow and Bone, and more!


    Tweetables:


    “I face the different problems. I face different teams, different application architectures. That's what I use. I use that knowledge to build the APIs that could work in all these scenarios.” — @posva [0:29:05]


    “I think, sometimes you also need to push the thing a little bit, because if you want to get more users, you need to announce things. You need to talk about the thing.” — @posva [0:36:03]


    Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:



    Pinia
    Flux architecture
    Ref & reactive
    Pinia docs: Composing Stores
    Vueland
    Cruz y Raya
    Steam curation: Can You Pet the Dog
    Eduardo on Twitter
    GitHub
    Blog/website
    Sponsor Eduardo on GitHub
    Pikuniku (Nintendo Switch, GOG, Itch, Steam)
    Shadow and Bone, Leigh Bardugo
    Eurovision Song Contest
    Overland (Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox, Itch Steam, GOG)
    Hori Nintendo Switch accessories (Pokèmon: Pikachu and Eevee edition)
    Special Guest: Eduardo San Martin Morote.

    • 53 min
    Episode 69: Nice Tools We Like

    Episode 69: Nice Tools We Like

    Admin note: Hey everyone! Please give us some feedback with out listener survey here: Enjoy the Vue listener survey


    There are so many tools out there that can make your life as a developer easier or more fun. In today’s episode, Alex, Tessa, and Ari sit down to share some of their favorite tools. We hear about why everyone loves VSCode and find out the story of how each panelist came to use this editor for their work. We also dive into themes, terminals, and font choices, where there are some seriously hot takes. In fact, Alex has such hot takes, we are not even sure he will be a host anymore! Our conversation even gets into mouse selection, keyboard choice, where you hear about what a hot-swappable keyboard is, and some of the best extensions for typos. Ultimately, you have to decide what makes your life better and improves your workflow. We are just here to share what works for us. Tune in to hear it all!


    Key Points From This Episode:



    Hear what editor everyone is currently using and the story behind their decisions. 
    What makes VSCode so powerful: all of its plugins. 
    Everyone’s VSCode theme of choice at the moment. 
    Hear about some of the instances when Alex uses light themes. 
    Find out what a ligature is and when you should and should not use them. 
    Fonts that Alex, Tessa, and Ari use in their editors. 
    The panel’s terminal decisions; there are some seriously hot takes! 
    Insights into why Alex doesn’t really use git commands. 
    Hear about Mac’s productivity app, Alfred, and how it works. 
    Some extensions that help with typos in the terminal. 
    Why Ari uses a gaming mouse and how this has helped her. 
    Ari, Tessa, and Alex’s keyboard habits and which fingers they use for what. 
    Some of the mouses Tessa, Ari, and Alex have used and currently use. 
    A look at the panel’s keyboard preferences. 
    What a hot-swappable keyboard is and the benefits of using one. 
    Final tools and tricks from everyone to end the show. 
    Hear what the panel’s picks for this week are.


    Tweetables:


    “What makes VS Code so powerful is its plugins. You can turn VS Code into an IDE, which is an integrated development environment. That allows you to have your debugging built-in.” —@fimion [0:04:40]


    “My random, other extra dev thing is that I use a gaming mouse.” — @GloomyLumi [0:31:41]


    “I feel like, if you have a mouse you take that opportunity to try a new mouse, because usually, you don't really have that option.” — Tessa [0:37:07]


    “Hot swappable boards are solderless. You just pop the switches up, pop in new ones, but you have to have something in the board to hold the switch in place.” —@fimion [0:40:54]


    Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:



    Enjoy the Vue listener survey
    Sublime Text
    VS Code
    PyCharm
    Nyan Progress Bar plugin
    Yoncé
    VSCodeThemes
    Dank Mono
    Cartograph
    Comic Mono
    Logitech K380 Multi-Device Bluetooth Keyboard
    Logitech MX Master 3
    Keycool KC-87 RGB
    WASD Keyboard
    Logitech G604
    Penn and Teller: Fool Us, CW
    Horizon Zero Dawn (Playstation 4, PC)
    Sanditon, BBC (PBS, Amazon Prime)
    Kipo and the Age of the Wonderbeasts, Netflix

    • 47 min
    Episode 68: Vue ESM Support on CodePen with Chris Coyier and Stephen Shaw

    Episode 68: Vue ESM Support on CodePen with Chris Coyier and Stephen Shaw

    We all love CodePen for its immediacy and were overjoyed when we heard the team had implemented a brand-new editor for Vue single-file components! Today Chris Coyier and Stephen Shaw from CodePen join us to talk about what it was like building this amazing feature into the platform. Our conversation begins with Chris giving a brief introduction to CodePen before getting into why he decided to start building it, and how it seemed like the logical next step to his CSS-Tricks blog. We talk about the many use cases of this hybrid between a code editor and a social network and each of us weighs in on how we like to use it in our development process. Of course, CodePen will become even more valuable to us now that it has a Vue editor and we take a deep dive with Chris and Steven into what it involved getting this feature off the ground. In our exploration, we come to see that the ease with which CodePen can demo projects on the fly requires a lot of work on the back end! Vue files can't be processed in the same ways as regular Pens and Stephen speaks to the challenge of getting the interface to support them so that the experience for the developer could be as close to plug and play as possible. So be sure to listen in today and try out the new Vue features on CodePen when you are done!


    Key Points From This Episode:



    Introducing Chris and Stephen and the work they do to maintain CodePen.
    How CodePen works and the many uses it can be put to by developers.
    The history behind why Chris started CodePen and how it has evolved over the years.
    Why the CodePen team implemented an editor for Vue single-file components.
    The hurdles of equipping CodePen to handle not just Vue but other editors too.
    Challenges of outputting Vue files versus regular Pens and how they were solved.
    How the method of safeguarding against circular dependency has evolved at CodePen.
    Thoughts about the potential benefits of putting the script tag at the top of Vue Pens.
    Perspectives on the different style guides for Vue versus React.
    Where to find Chris and Steven online and learn more about what they do.


    Tweetables:


    “I roped in some friends, and we built the first version of CodePen and the whole point was embedding. It wasn't the website itself, it was putting demos elsewhere.” — @chriscoyier [0:11:06]


    “When I came in, I was more experienced with Vue, but coming into a React world, and I saw so much of the value of Vue and the way that single file components work, and that's very much a CodePen-y thing.” — @shshaw [0:14:11]


    “A lot of this is like, how do we rearchitect CodePen in such a way that you can do things like that and not have it be such an embarrassing amount of technical debt that you'll freaking never do anything again.” — @chriscoyier [0:17:52]


    How to Find Chris:



    chriscoyier.net


    How to Find Stephen:



    Twitter
    GitHub
    keyframers


    Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:



    CodePen
    CSS-Tricks
    JSFiddle
    JS Bin
    Calls , Apple TV+
    Waffles + Mochi, Netflix
    The Last Man on Earth, Fox (2015 TV Show, Hulu)
    Ted Lasso, AppleTV+
    Derek, Netflix
    Samsung Galaxy Buds Live
    Among Us (iOS, Android, Nintendo Switch, PC)
    Let’s Watch Star Trek Next Generation  episode guide

    • 54 min
    Episode 67: Reimagining Online Events with Em Lazer-Walker

    Episode 67: Reimagining Online Events with Em Lazer-Walker

    Key Points From This Episode:



    Memories of the last conferences before the pandemic and thoughts on virtual events.
    Em's experiences running Roguelike Celebration, and some history of the related games and community.
    The event's transition to online-only in response to the pandemic and how they weathered the storm.
    The considerations that go into planning an event with a focus on community and meaningful conversations.
    How Em went about building the infrastructure that matched the strengths of online games.
    Video chat versus text-chat; the two camps that exist and accommodating both groups.
    Ways that Em and his team are simulating the social environment and cues of in-person gatherings.
    How accessibility concerns were addressed for Roguelike Celebration; text, color, chat, and more!
    Thoughts on the future of the online event and how it might change and grow.
    Challenges with the interface; dealing with concerns around confusion and similarities to other platforms.
    The question of chat histories and digital hoarding, and why Em decided against newer chat trends.
    Scheduling and timing issues for the conference and the big request for more free time from attendees.
    The approach to post-event interaction and conversation and the impromptu way things played out.
    Possibilities for the growth of the video chat feature for the event in the future.
    How listeners can get involved and check out the open-source space.
    This week's picks! TV series, movies, audiobooks, games, and more!


    Tweetables:



    “I think trying to have a digital-physical hybrid event is inherently a flawed strategy. I don't think it is possible to do it in a way that the people who are attending one of the two events don't feel like they are getting the sub-par experience.” — @lazerwalker [0:26:22]
    “Providing a novel space itself is inherently valuable, because you are giving people the chance to escape and this feels like something new in a way that a physical event space feels like something new.” — @lazerwalker [0:27:31]


    Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:



    Roguelike Celebration
    Using Game Design to Make Virtual Events More Social, Em Lazer-Walker
    Rogue (Game)
    MUD (Multi-User Dungeon)
    Code of Conduct
    WebRTC
    Yet Another Browser Mud (Em’s OSS space)
    Why Video Chat is a Hard Technical Problem, DEV Community 👩‍💻👨‍💻 (WebRTC article)
    Gnosia (Nintendo Switch)
    The Art of Gathering, Priya Parker
    Together Apart, Priya Parker (podcast)
    Penn and Teller: Fool Us, CW
    The One, Netflix
    Murder on the Orient Express, Agatha Christie (read by Dan Stevens)
    Special Guest: Em Lazer-Walker.

    • 49 min
    Episode 66: RFC The Vue: Vuex 5

    Episode 66: RFC The Vue: Vuex 5

    Key Points From This Episode:



    A brief description of Vuex, a Redux pattern, but implemented in Vue.
    All the new features on the horizon for Vuex 5 to be found in the RFC.
    Removing mutations and allowing updates to state to happen via actions.
    Flux architecture as a conceptual framework for data flow through your application.
    Whether there is any need for the Vuex store considering the Vue3 composition API.
    Perspectives on the decision to get rid of modules and have multiple global stores.
    Getting away from a mixin paradigm with hook-into methods and moving to pure state.
    Composition-based stores rather than passing in objects and the advantages of this.
    Different ways of using the composition API and what the future might hold.
    Not having to reference the dot value part of each property when using a composition store.
    Discussing what it means that Vuex 5 is proposing automatic store registration.
    How circular store references work and the limited support for these in Vuex 5.
    The addition of plugins, how to use them, and how store actions could trigger router actions.
    TypeScript support, how to link it with plugins, and the extra accessibility this provides.
    Serialization and hydration, what this means, and how it allows for data to be stored and rebuilt.
    An overview of the structure of the RFC and how user-friendly it was to read.


    Tweetables:



    “The current thinking is, why don't we just not have mutations and allow updates to state to happen in an action?” — @EnjoyTheVueCast [0:03:41]
    “Dare I say, this almost feels like mixins, but make it name-spaced. You’re just rolling all the stuff in. It feels cleaner somehow.” — @EnjoyTheVueCast [0:15:58]
    “This whole thing feels very exciting in a very weird way. Because I feel I'm more familiar with this non-existent Vuex 5 than I am with the existing Vuex 3 that I've been using for the past few years.” — @EnjoyTheVueCast [0:28:43]
    “This is a really, really big change in how things work” — @EnjoyTheVueCast [0:36:11]


    Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:



    Vuex 5 RFC
    The State of Vuex at VueJS Global, Kia King (VueJS Global)
    Flux
    Redux
    7 secret patterns Vue consultants don’t want you to know, Chris Fritz (VueConf US 2018)
    Frostbeard Studio
    WandaVision, Disney+
    mask chains (Etsy)

    • 44 min

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