1 hr

Long-play: Katherine Angel The Philosophy of Sex

    • Sexuality

Welcome to The Philosophy of Sex. Today we’re talking about consent. The idea of affirmative consent first attracted attention in the early 1990s. Since then, consent laws have been passed in a number of countries. Alongside legislation, women are often told to know what they want and know how to communicate this to their partners. While women asserting their pleasure sounds positive, it assumes communication guarantees safety and that a satisfying experience will follow. But might the pressure to give a fully formed and enthusiastic ‘yes’, be at odds with the ability to take risks and explore sexually? 
If we look at the dominant culture around sex, in recent years, two requirements have emerged for good sex: consent and self-knowledge. This seems like progress. It takes women at their word and defuses the potential for sexual violence. But does conceit of absolute clarity place the burden of good sexual interaction on women’s behaviour?
In this episode, Caroline speaks with Katherine Angel to unpack the shortcomings of affirmative consent, 
Katherine is a writer and academic. She directs the MA in Creative and Critical Writing at Birkbeck University of London, where she teaches fiction, non-fiction, and critical work relating to sexuality, feminism, gender, and psychoanalysis. 
Katherine has a PhD in the history of psychiatry and sexuality from the University of Cambridge. She’s held multiple fellowships at academic institutions in Europe, the US and the UK, including Harvard and the University of London's Centre for the History of Emotions. Her research into 'female sexual dysfunction', American psychiatry,  sexology, and feminism has been published in journals including the History of the Human Sciences, Studies in Gender and Sexuality and Current Opinion in Psychiatry. 
From ‘No means No’ to #MeToo, Katherine shares her thoughts on consent and the complexities of female desire. A heads up that sexual violence, rape and assault are discussed during the episode, but no specific details are included. 
Resources:
Check out Katherine’s work here.
Connect with us:
@becuming.me
Becuming takes the frustration out of finding the perfect sex toy by sending you personalised recommendations. Check it out at www.becuming.me. 


Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Welcome to The Philosophy of Sex. Today we’re talking about consent. The idea of affirmative consent first attracted attention in the early 1990s. Since then, consent laws have been passed in a number of countries. Alongside legislation, women are often told to know what they want and know how to communicate this to their partners. While women asserting their pleasure sounds positive, it assumes communication guarantees safety and that a satisfying experience will follow. But might the pressure to give a fully formed and enthusiastic ‘yes’, be at odds with the ability to take risks and explore sexually? 
If we look at the dominant culture around sex, in recent years, two requirements have emerged for good sex: consent and self-knowledge. This seems like progress. It takes women at their word and defuses the potential for sexual violence. But does conceit of absolute clarity place the burden of good sexual interaction on women’s behaviour?
In this episode, Caroline speaks with Katherine Angel to unpack the shortcomings of affirmative consent, 
Katherine is a writer and academic. She directs the MA in Creative and Critical Writing at Birkbeck University of London, where she teaches fiction, non-fiction, and critical work relating to sexuality, feminism, gender, and psychoanalysis. 
Katherine has a PhD in the history of psychiatry and sexuality from the University of Cambridge. She’s held multiple fellowships at academic institutions in Europe, the US and the UK, including Harvard and the University of London's Centre for the History of Emotions. Her research into 'female sexual dysfunction', American psychiatry,  sexology, and feminism has been published in journals including the History of the Human Sciences, Studies in Gender and Sexuality and Current Opinion in Psychiatry. 
From ‘No means No’ to #MeToo, Katherine shares her thoughts on consent and the complexities of female desire. A heads up that sexual violence, rape and assault are discussed during the episode, but no specific details are included. 
Resources:
Check out Katherine’s work here.
Connect with us:
@becuming.me
Becuming takes the frustration out of finding the perfect sex toy by sending you personalised recommendations. Check it out at www.becuming.me. 


Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

1 hr