298 episodes

The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

    SHORTCAST | Gender and COVID-19: a feminist economic lens

    SHORTCAST | Gender and COVID-19: a feminist economic lens

    Contributor(s): Professor Naila Kabeer | Join us for this first lecture in our new series organised in memory of Sylvia Chant which will be delivered by Naila Kabeer.
    Professor Kabeer will use a feminist economic lens to analyse a range of different impacts associated with COVID-19 and to explore the kinds of policies that such a lens would suggest for a more resilient and equitable future.
    Meet our speaker and chair
    Naila Kabeer (@N_Kabeer) is Professor of Gender and Development at the Department of Gender Studies and Department of International Development at LSE.
    Eric Neumayer is Professor of Environment and Development and Pro-Director (PVC) Planning and Resources at LSE.
    More about this event
    The Sylvia Chant Lectures are organised in memory of Sylvia Chant, Professor of Development Geography.
    The Department of Geography and Environment (@LSEGeography) is a centre of international academic excellence in economic, urban and development geography, environmental social science and climate change.
    LSE Gender (@LSEGenderTweet) pioneers intersectional, interdisciplinary and transnational teaching and research, addressing the tenacity of gendered power relations and gendered inequalities in times of global transformations. Established in 1993, LSE Gender is the largest Department of Gender Studies in Europe.
    This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

    • 12 min
    SHORTCAST | What We Owe Each Other: a new social contract

    SHORTCAST | What We Owe Each Other: a new social contract

    Contributor(s): Baroness Shafik, Juan Manuel Santos, Professor Amartya Sen | What should a social contract for the 21st century look like?
    Launching her new book, What We Owe Each Other, LSE Director Minouche Shafik draws on evidence from across the globe to identify key principles for a social contract for every society. She will be in conversation with Juan Manuel Santos and Amartya Sen.
    The social contract governs all aspects of society, from politics and law to our families and communities. Accelerating changes in technology, demography, climate and global health, as we have seen over the last year, will reshape our world in ways we have yet to fully grasp. How do we pool risks, share resources and balance individual with collective responsibility? What part do we each have to play?
    You can order the book, What We Owe Each Other: a new social contract, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney.
    Meet our speakers and chair
    Minouche Shafik is Director of LSE. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. An economist by training, Baroness Shafik has spent most of her career straddling the worlds of public policy and academia. After completing her BSc in economics and politics at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, she took an MSc in economics at LSE before completing a DPhil in economics at St Antony’s College at the University of Oxford. In 2020 the UK Government announced that she would be made a Life Peer in the House of Lords.
    Juan Manuel Santos Calderón (@JuanManSantos) is the former President of the Republic of Colombia, serving two terms, from 2010 to 2018. He was Colombia’s first Foreign Trade Minister, has been Minister of Finance and before being elected President, was Minister for National Defence. Prior to entering politics, President Santos was deputy director of El Tiempo newspaper, and wrote a weekly opinion column. He was awarded the King of Spain International Journalism Award and named president of the Freedom of Expression Commission for the Inter American Press Association (IAPA). In 2016 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He is a member of The Elders and a Honorary Graduate of LSE. President Santos studied for a Master of Science in the Department of Economics at LSE in 1975.
    Amartya Sen is Thomas W Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University and an LSE Honorary Fellow. His research has ranged over social choice theory, economic theory, ethics and political philosophy, welfare economics, theory of measurement, decision theory, development economics, public health, and gender studies. Amartya Sen’s books have been translated into more than thirty languages and his awards include the Nobel Prize in Economics.
    Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. He is also a member of the National Infrastructure Commission. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and British Academy. He is also a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Economic Association and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    • 19 min
    The Psychology of Intergroup Inequality

    The Psychology of Intergroup Inequality

    Contributor(s): Professor Jim Sidanius | The Black Lives Matter and #MeToo movements have led to a renewed focus on the persistence of inequality along the lines of race, gender, and their intersection. Political psychology attempts to shed light on this through connecting individual behaviour to wider institutional and ideological dynamics. On the eve of the completion of an updated edition of his now classic text, Social Dominance: An Intergroup Theory of Hierarchy and Oppression, political psychologist Jim Sidanius will present some of his latest ideas on the psychological foundations of intergroup inequality, followed by a conversation on their relevance to twenty-first century struggles for social justice.
    Meet our speaker and chair
    Jim Sidanius is the John Lindsley Professor of Psychology in memory of William James and of African and African American Studies at Harvard University.
    Jennifer Sheehy-Skeffington (@jsskeffington) is an Assistant Professor in the department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE.
    More about this event
    The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world.

    • 1 hr 10 min
    Drugs and Development Policies: a discussion with the Global Commission on Drug Policy

    Drugs and Development Policies: a discussion with the Global Commission on Drug Policy

    Contributor(s): Kgalema Motlanthe, Ruth Dreifuss, Helen Clark, Juan Manuel Santos Calderón |
    In the last decade, the negative consequences of the international drug control regime based on repression and coercion have increasingly become visible barriers to sustainable development. Despite important reforms and paradigm changes in certain countries and regions, drug policies still pose serious challenges to the international development objectives.
    These consequences range from negative outcomes in control of infectious diseases, in access to controlled pain relief, in over incarceration and disproportionality of sentencing targeting certain populations, to breaches in the rule of law as drug laws are not complied with. These consequences are visible and dire at all levels of governance, and affect the most marginalized populations first.
    What can be done to mitigate the negative consequences of drug policies on development, and what reforms are suggested? This high-level discussion will explore the experiences of four former heads of state or government, from four regions in the world, to discuss the medium and long-term solutions to the harms created by current drug control policies.
    Meet our speakers and chair
    Juan Manuel Santos Calderón (@JuanManSantos) is the former President of the Republic of Colombia, serving two terms, from 2010 to 2018. He was Colombia’s first Foreign Trade Minister, has been Minister of Finance and before being elected President, was Minister for National Defence. Prior to entering politics, President Santos was deputy director of El Tiempo newspaper, and wrote a weekly opinion column. He was awarded the King of Spain International Journalism Award and named president of the Freedom of Expression Commission for the Inter American Press Association (IAPA). In 2016 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He is a member of The Elders, a member of the Global Commission on Drug Policy and a Honorary Graduate of LSE. President Santos studied for a Master of Science in the Department of Economics at LSE in 1975.
    Helen Clark (@HelenClarkNZ) is a global leader on sustainable development, gender equality and international co-operation. She served three successive terms as Prime Minister of New Zealand between 1999 and 2008. She then became the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Administrator for two terms from 2009 to 2017, the first woman to lead the organisation. She was also the Chair of the United Nations Development Group, a committee consisting of the Heads of all UN funds, programmes and departments working on development issues. In 2019 Helen Clark became patron of The Helen Clark Foundation. In 2020, she was elected chair of the Global Commission on Drug Policy.
    Ruth Dreifuss was elected Federal Councillor in 1993 by the Federal Assembly, and was re-elected twice. From 1993 to her resignation in 2002, she was Head of the Federal Department of Home Affairs, in charge of public health and social insurance. During the year 1999, Ruth Dreifuss was President of the Swiss Confederation. After her retirement from government, she chaired the commission mandated by WHO that reported on public health, innovation and intellectual property rights, and co-chaired the High Level Panel on Access to Medicines, mandated by the United Nations Secretary-General. Ruth Dreifuss is member of the Global Commission on Drug Policy, which she chaired from 2016 to 2020. She also serves as a member of the International Commission against the Death Penalty.
    Kgalema Motlanthe was elected President of the Republic of South Africa by the Parliament in September 2008, a position he held until 9 May 2009. He was appointed by President Jacob Zuma to serve as the Deputy President. He served in that position from 11 May 2009 until 24 May 2014. Motlanthe also served two five-year terms as Secretary General of the ANC from De

    • 1 hr 33 min
    The Hype Machine: how social media disrupts our elections, our economy and our health

    The Hype Machine: how social media disrupts our elections, our economy and our health

    Contributor(s): Professor Sinan Aral | Join us for this talk by MIT professor Sinan Aral who will draw on two decades of his own research and business experience and go under the hood of the biggest, most powerful social networks to tackle the critical question of just how much social media actually shapes our choices, for better or worse.
    In his new book, which he will be talking about, Aral shows how the tech behind social media offers the same set of behaviour-influencing levers to both Russian hackers and brand marketers—to everyone who hopes to change the way we think and act—which is why its consequences affect everything from elections to business, dating to health. Along the way, he covers a wide array of topics, including how network effects fuel Twitter’s and Facebook’s massive growth to the neuroscience of how social media affects our brains, the real consequences of fake news, the power of social ratings, and the impact of social media on our kids. In mapping out strategies for being more thoughtful consumers of social media, The Hype Machine offers the definitive guide to understanding and harnessing for good the technology that has redefined our world overnight.
    Meet our speaker and chair
    Sinan Aral (@sinanaral) is the David Austin Professor of Management, Marketing, IT, and Data Science at MIT; director of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy; and head of MIT’s Social Analytics Lab.
    Edgar Whitley is an Associate Professor (Reader) of Information Systems at LSE Department of Management.

    • 59 min
    A Theory of Everything?

    A Theory of Everything?

    Contributor(s): Professor Jessica Wilson, Dr Vanessa Seifert, Philip Ball | The biologist Theodosius Dobzhansky wrote that nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution. Is there an even more general theory that can make sense of all the sciences? The various scientific disciplines each have their own methods, theories, and practices. This is the case even when different sciences try to explain the same phenomena. Can we translate between these distinct disciplines? What does this even mean? Might all of science be reduced to physics one day? Our panel discuss reduction, emergence, and the unity of the sciences.
    Meet our speakers and chair
    Philip Ball (@philipcball) is a science writer and Editor of Nature.
    Vanessa Seifert (@seifert_vanessa) is Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Bristol.
    Jessica Wilson is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto.
    Clare Moriarty (@quiteclare) is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and IRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Trinity College Dublin.
    More about this event
    The Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) hosts events exploring science, politics, and culture from a philosophical perspective.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum

    • 1 hr 14 min

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