45 episodes

The stories of prominent people, events and places that shaped South African history.

Moments in South African History SABC Radio News

    • History

The stories of prominent people, events and places that shaped South African history.

    The Constitutional Court of South Africa

    The Constitutional Court of South Africa

    After a long process to choose a design and construct a building, the new South African Constitutional Court building, the flagship structure of Constitution Hill, was officially opened on 21 March 2004. Judge Albie Sachs gives us a tour of the historic site.



    Credits: Angie Kapelianis



    © SABC 2021. No unauthorised use, copying, adaptation or reproduction permitted without prior written consent of the SABC.

    • 6 min
    The Apartheid Museum

    The Apartheid Museum

    Most people would frown at a casino consortium agreeing to build a museum for its licence. But that’s exactly what Gold Reef City has done with the help of a team of experts. It got its licence and it’s quietly built an impressive apartheid museum on its doorstep in Johannesburg. The museum opened in 2001.



    Credits:  Angie Kapelianis



    © SABC 2021. No unauthorised use, copying, adaptation or reproduction permitted without prior written consent of the SABC.

    • 3 min
    Dirk Coetzee - Till the day I die

    Dirk Coetzee - Till the day I die

    He was unknown to the Security Police at Vlakplaas near Pretoria until they were told to "make a plan" with him. Several banning orders, long days in detention and a spell on Robben Island had failed to break his spirit and crush his fight against apartheid. He was Griffiths Mxenge, the human rights lawyer who vigorously defended ANC comrades. So they abducted, stabbed and hammered him to death at Umlazi, south of Durban, in November 1981. Fifteen years later, in October 1996, three of Mxengeís awaiting-trial murderers appeared before the Amnesty Committee in Durban. They were Dirk Coetzee, Almond Nofemela and David Tshikalanga. Although they had already broken their oath of silence on the apartheid governmentís death-squads seven years earlier, they had never buried their skeletons.



    Credits:  Angie Kapelianis and Dumisani Shange, Sally Burdett and Danny Booysen.



    Transcript: http://www.sabctruth.co.za/sabctruth/worldsright.htm#till



    From the series South Africa's Human Spirit. Available wherever you find your podcasts.



    © SABC 2021. No unauthorised use, copying, adaptation or reproduction permitted without prior written consent of the SABC.



    Additional music: B - Somber Ballads by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Blue Feather - Reunited by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1200068 Artist: http://incompetech.com/

    • 9 min
    Who killed the Cradock Four?

    Who killed the Cradock Four?

    They became known as the Cradock Four: Matthew Goniwe, Fort Calata, Sparrow Mkhonto and Sicelo Mhlauli. On the 27th of June 1985, these four men left the small Eastern Cape town of Cradock for a meeting of the United Democratic Front in Port Elizabeth. A few days later, their mutilated and charred bodies were found in the bush outside the city. Convicted Vlakplaas commander Colonel Eugene de Kock recalled that Goniwe's death was "the beginning of the end of apartheid". "Who killed Matthew Goniwe?" was a constant refrain for 13 years until February 1998, when a group of former security policemen finally stepped forward and said: "We killed the Cradock Four."



    Credits: Zola Ntutu, Darren Taylor, Thapelo Mokushane, Angie Kapelianis, Sally Burdett and Danny Booysen.



    Transcript: http://www.sabctruth.co.za/sabctruth/worldsright.htm#cant



    From the series South Africa's Human Spirit. Available wherever you find your podcasts.



    © SABC 2021. No unauthorised use, copying, adaptation or reproduction permitted without prior written consent of the SABC.

    • 8 min
    Eugene de Kock - A thousand shades of grey

    Eugene de Kock - A thousand shades of grey

    The media painted him as the arch-villain of the apartheid era and labelled him "Prime Evil". The Truth Commission singled him out as the man who broke the code of silence and forced security policemen to seek amnesty. He was Eugene de Kock, former commander of the Vlakplaas death squad, convicted murderer serving two life sentences and 212 years in jail for apartheid crimes, and amnesty applicant who helped convict former president PW Botha for contempt of the Truth Commission. Eugene de Kock waged war against liberation movements in Namibia, Zimbabwe and Angola in the seventies and eighties. When he returned home to fight the ANC, he said: "My war is only just starting." At Vlakplaas, the colonel led his men from the front. At various amnesty hearings, the prisoner still refused to abandon them. But for his former masters, the politicians and the generals, Eugene de Kock had only bitter venom.



    Credits: Angie Kapelianis, Darren Taylor, Sally Burdett and Danny Booysen.



    From the series South Africa's Human Spirit. Available wherever you find your podcasts.



    Transcript: http://www.sabctruth.co.za/sabctruth/worldsright.htm#thousand



    © SABC 2021. No unauthorised use, copying, adaptation or reproduction permitted without prior written consent of the SABC.



    Additional music by Whitesand - Do You Feel What I Feel? - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eM7qA8n9S88&list=RDkQSoW1VnkH4&index=47 

    • 5 min
    Doctor death

    Doctor death

    The apartheid government’s top-secret Chemical and Biological Warfare Programme sealed the Truth Commission’s investigations into gross human rights abuses on the 31st of July 1998. South Africans and the world listened with disbelief and then shock to a group of doctors who perverted science to entrench white supremacy. Truth Commission Chairperson Desmond Tutu described the public testimony on the programme, code-named Project Coast, as "the worst evidence I’ve ever heard". Some of the apartheid scientists disclosed how they tried to produce a vaccine and a bacterium to sterilise and kill only black people. But the most disturbing allegation was that the apartheid government planned to poison jailed ANC leader Nelson Mandela in the eighties.



    Credits: Darren Taylor, Angie Kapelianis, Manana Makhanya and Danny Booysen.



    Transcript: http://www.sabctruth.co.za/sabctruth/slicesright.htm#doctor 



    From the series South Africa's Human Spirit. Available wherever you find your podcasts.



    © SABC 2021. No unauthorised use, copying, adaptation or reproduction permitted without prior written consent of the SABC.



    Additional music by Whitesand - Do You Feel What I Feel? - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eM7qA8n9S88&list=RDkQSoW1VnkH4&index=47 

    • 9 min

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