93 episodes

Interviews with Authors writing about Australia and New Zealand
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New Books in Australian and New Zealand Studie‪s‬ Marshall Poe

    • Society & Culture

Interviews with Authors writing about Australia and New Zealand
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    Sam van Zweden, "Eating with My Mouth Open" (NewSouth, 2021)

    Sam van Zweden, "Eating with My Mouth Open" (NewSouth, 2021)

    Wow! Food, family, memory, insight, body, mind - worth the effort this one.
    Eating with My Mouth Open (NewSouth, 2021) is food writing like you’ve never seen before: honest, brave, and exceptionally tasty. Lyrically written, Sam van Zweden offers a millennial response to classic food writers, revelling in body positivity on Instagram, remembering how Tupperware piled high with sweets can be a symptom of spiralling mental health, dissecting wellness culture and all its flaws, sharing the joys of living in a family of chefs and seeing a history of migration on her dinner plate.
    Recalling the writing of Lindy West and Roxane Gay, as well as classic food writers M.F.K. Fisher and Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, Eating with My Mouth Open considers embodiment and the meaning of true nourishment within the broken food system we live in. Not holding back from the struggles of mental illness and difficult conversations about weight and wellbeing, Sam Van Zweden advocates for a body politics that is empowering, productive and meaningful.
    Sam van Zweden is a Melbourne-based freelance writer interested in experimental nonfiction, essays, mental health, body writing, food, and memory. Sam’s writing has appeared in the Saturday Paper, Meanjin, The Big Issue, The Lifted Brow, Cordite, The Sydney Review of Books, The Wheeler Centre and others.
    Bede Haines is a solicitor, specialising in litigation and a partner at Holding Redlich, an Australian commercial law firm. He lives in Sydney, Australia. Known to read books, ride bikes and eat cereal (often). bede.haines@holdingredlich.com.
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    • 1 hr
    Emilia E. Skrzypek, "Revealing the Invisible Mine: Social Complexities of an Undeveloped Mining Project" (Berghahn, 2020)

    Emilia E. Skrzypek, "Revealing the Invisible Mine: Social Complexities of an Undeveloped Mining Project" (Berghahn, 2020)

    Located amid tropical rainforest in the heart of Papua New Guinea, the Frieda River area is home to one of the biggest undeveloped gold and copper deposits in the Pacific. For decades, mining companies have prospected in this area in anticipation of a large-scale mine which may (or may not) open in the future. In Emilia E. Skrzypek, Revealing the Invisible Mine: Social Complexities of an Undeveloped Mining Project (Berghahn, 2020). Emilia 'Emilka' Skrzypek tells the story of Paiyamo people on whose land a potential mine may be located. Paiyamo people hope that the mine will lead to the development of their remote rural area, and in this book Skrzypek show the unique cultural logic they use to make the potential mine a reality, or -- to use Paiyamo terms -- to 'reveal' a mine whose existence has already affected their lives, but which has not yet emerged and become visible.
    In this episode of the podcast host Alex Golub speaks to Emilka about the potential Frieda mine, Paiyamo people, and the way they grapple with the existence of an anticipated mine. What does it mean to view knowledge in terms of its effect rather than its accuracy? How are relationships created and transformed as people realize older understandings and secrets had a meaning which is only now being understood in the present context? How might we use this analytic lens to think about the work of ethnography and fieldwork itself? These are just some of the questions which Alex and Emilka discuss in this interview
    Emilia Skrzypek is a senior research fellow in the Department of Social Anthropology at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland. Her most recent article, "Extractive entanglements and regimes of accountability at an undeveloped mining project" appears in the December 2020 number of Resources Policy. 
    Alex Golub is an associate professor in the Anthropology Department at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa in Honolulu. His most recent publication is a biographical interview with Martha Macintyre, an anthropologist of mining, in the edited volume Unequal Lives: Gender, Race, and Class in The Western Pacific. 
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    • 58 min
    Meredith Lake, "The Bible in Australia: A Cultural History" (NewSouth, 2020)

    Meredith Lake, "The Bible in Australia: A Cultural History" (NewSouth, 2020)

    The bible and Australian society! Meredith Lake's published a new 2020 edition of The Bible in Australia: A Cultural History (NewSouth Books, 2020). It's history and sociology and reflections on religion's role on the 'Great Southern Land'. Meredith Lake gets under the skin of a text that’s been read, wrestled with, preached and tattooed, and believed to be everything from a resented imposition to the very Word of God.
    The Bible in Australia explores how in the hands of Bible-bashers, immigrants, suffragists, evangelists, unionists, writers, artists and Indigenous Australians, the Bible has played a contested but defining role in this country.
    Meredith Lake is an historian, broadcaster and award-winning writer interested in how Australians understand the big questions of faith and meaning. She currently hosts Soul Search on ABC Radio National - a weekly show about the lived experience of religion and spirituality. She has also guest presented ABC TV's Compass.
    Bede Haines is a solicitor, specialising in litigation and a partner at Holding Redlich, an Australian commercial law firm. He lives in Sydney, Australia. Known to read books, ride bikes and eat cereal (often). bede.haines@holdingredlich.com.
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    • 1 hr 10 min
    Katharine Massam, "A Bridge Between: Spanish Benedictine Missionary Women in Australia" (ANU Press, 2020)

    Katharine Massam, "A Bridge Between: Spanish Benedictine Missionary Women in Australia" (ANU Press, 2020)

    Katharine Massam's A Bridge Between: Spanish Benedictine Missionary Women in Australia (ANU Press, 2020) is the first book detailing the Benedictine women who worked at New Norcia, examining their life in the Western Australian mission town. From the founding of a grand school intended for ‘nativas’, through to their house in the Kimberley-region, and the recruiting via a network of villages near Burgos in the north of Spain, this is a complex international history. A Bridge Between gathers a powerful, fragmented story from the margins of the archive, recalling the Aboriginal women who joined the community in the 1950s and the compelling reunion of missionaries and former students in 2001. By tracing the all-but-forgotten story of the community of Benedictine women who were central to the experience of the mission for many Aboriginal families in the twentieth century, this book lays a foundation for further work.
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    • 1 hr 7 min
    Stuart Kells, "The Convent: A City Finds Its Heart" (Miegunyah Press, 2020)

    Stuart Kells, "The Convent: A City Finds Its Heart" (Miegunyah Press, 2020)

    Nuns, inmates, community vs corporation, Australia, oasis in a metropolis.
    The Abbotsford Convent left to languish for years after the last of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd had gone. In its prime it had been a school, a refuge, a retreat, a workhouse and a prison-the single largest charitable institution in the southern hemisphere.
    In the late 1990s a proposed high-density development threatened the idyllic riverside location, sparking outrage in the local community and further afield. Years of protesting, negotiating and fundraising followed and the convent, now on Australia's National Heritage List, has started a new life as a vibrant centre for art and culture.
    The Convent: A City Finds Its Heart (Miegunyah Press, 2020) tells the story of the site's rich history and the efforts to preserve it. It is an uplifting tale of community activism-a tangible reminder that the magic of the past can endure and what people-power can achieve.
    Stuart Kells, Adjunct Professor, La Trobe Business School, La Trobe University in Melbourne. His other roles include Research Fellow at Melbourne University’s Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, member of Monash University’s Centre for Regulatory Studies, roles in the Victorian Department of Premier and Cabinet, the Victorian Auditor-General’s Office, and as an economist at accountancy firms PPB Advisory and KPMG. In addition, and maybe most pleasingly for us readers, Stuart is an accomplished and prized author of several genres: social history; science; literary history; economic and business history, and recently fiction.
    Bede Haines is a solicitor, specialising in litigation and a partner at Holding Redlich, an Australian commercial law firm. He lives in Sydney, Australia. Known to read books, ride bikes and eat cereal (often). bede.haines@holdingredlich.com
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    • 1 hr 4 min
    Peter Hart, "The Gallipoli Evacuation" (Living History, 2020)

    Peter Hart, "The Gallipoli Evacuation" (Living History, 2020)

    One of the most well-told episodes of the First World War, the 1915 Gallipoli expedition, also has its own long-ignored aspects - specifically, the story of how the Allied force successfully evacuated in the middle of winter under the guns of the Turkish defenders. Our guest for this episode of New Books in Military History is an expert on the Gallipoli campaign, retired chief oral historian of the Imperial War Museum in London, U.K., Peter Hart. In a rollicking and engaging interview with host Bobby WIntermute, Peter discusses his most recent book, The Gallipoli Evacuation (Living History, 2020), the oral historian's craft, and the overall conditions faced by British, ANZAC, French, and Turkish troops in the waning months of the campaign. 
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    • 1 hr 3 min

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