300 episodes

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The Daily The New York Times

    • Daily News
    • 4.7, 347 Ratings

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    'Rabbit Hole,' Episode 7: 'Where We Go One'

    'Rabbit Hole,' Episode 7: 'Where We Go One'

    Note: This episode contains strong language.

    Today, we’re sharing Episode 7 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose.

    In this episode, our reporter investigates the QAnon conspiracy theories. The story of QAnon believers, united in a battle against what they see as dark forces of the world, reveals where the internet is headed.

    For more information on “Rabbit Hole” and today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/rabbithole.

    • 29 min
    Special Episode: The Latest From Minneapolis

    Special Episode: The Latest From Minneapolis

    As protests spread over the death of George Floyd, the former officer at the center of the case has been charged with murder. We listen in on the demonstrations, and examine why this tragedy — though too familiar — may be a turning point. Guest: Audra D. S. Burch, a national enterprise correspondent for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

    Background reading:Derek Chauvin, a former police officer, was charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter for kneeling on the neck of Mr. Floyd for nearly nine minutes as he repeatedly pleaded “I can’t breathe.”In the year before their fatal encounter, Mr. Floyd and Mr. Chauvin worked at the same nightclub.Protests over racism and police violence have erupted across the U.S. Follow the latest updates.

    • 17 min
    One Hundred Thousand Lives

    One Hundred Thousand Lives

    Barbara Krupke won the lottery. Fred Walter Gray enjoyed his bacon and hash browns crispy. Orlando Moncada crawled through a hole in a fence to reach the United States. John Prine chronicled the human condition. Cornelia Ann Hunt left the world with gratitude.

    Over 100,000 people have died from the coronavirus in the United States. Today, we glimpse inside the lives of just a few of them.

    Background reading: Memories collected from obituaries across the country help us visualize and reckon with the incalculable loss of more than 100,000 lives.

    • 30 min
    Space Travel, Privatized

    Space Travel, Privatized

    After nearly a decade on the sidelines of space travel, Cape Canaveral is again launching a shuttle into space. But this time, a private company will be sending NASA astronauts into orbit. What does this moment mean for human exploration of the solar system? Guests: Kenneth Chang, a science reporter at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: Here’s a look inside the vessel that is scheduled to become the first crewed spacecraft launched in the United States since the end of the shuttle program in 2011.Meet SpaceX’s first NASA astronauts: Robert L. Behnken and Douglas G. Hurley, who have been friends and colleagues for two decades.

    • 26 min
    Can the Postal Service Survive the Pandemic?

    Can the Postal Service Survive the Pandemic?

    The U.S. Postal Service has survived the telegraph, the fax machine and the dawn of the internet. But will it survive coronavirus? Guests: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times and Derek Harpe, a Postal Service worker with a mail route in Mocksville, N.C. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: With the coronavirus threatening the Postal Service’s financial viability, a rescue for the organization has become a political battle.

    • 30 min
    The Story of Two Brothers From Mexico

    The Story of Two Brothers From Mexico

    Two brothers, Javier Morales, 48, and Martin Morales, 39, died of coronavirus within hours of each other in their adopted home of New Jersey. Their last wish was to be buried at home in Mexico, but, to make that happen, their family must navigate the vast bureaucracies of two countries, international airfare and the complications of a pandemic. Guest:Annie Correal, an immigration reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Shaila and Melanie Cruz Morales, twin sisters from New Jersey who are the men’s nieces. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: In Mexico, being buried near home is a sacred rite. These are the obstacles the Morales family has faced as they try to return their uncles’ bodies home.

    • 44 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
347 Ratings

347 Ratings

Philthebuilder ,

Great Show

I hear a lot about racial disparity on this show. But very little in relation to Native Americans. Why?

Rosey9697 ,

Brilliant journalism

One of the few news sources I actually trust and would recommend. It’s my ‘go to’. Such great journalism and Michael is just the best !

Chowchow17 ,

New Zealand listener

I live a long way from New York in Auckland, New Zealand but it’s still relevant to me, especially the Epstein and Weinstein stories. I listen to The Daily on the daily. Brilliant journalism, keep doing what you do. By the way I love Michael’s hmmmm’s 👍

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