300 episodes

The New Stack Podcast is all about the developers, software engineers and operations people who build at-scale architectures that change the way we develop and deploy software.

For more content from The New Stack, subscribe on YouTube at: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheNewStack

The New Stack Podcast The New Stack

    • Technology

The New Stack Podcast is all about the developers, software engineers and operations people who build at-scale architectures that change the way we develop and deploy software.

For more content from The New Stack, subscribe on YouTube at: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheNewStack

    Couchbase’s Managed Database Services: Computing at the Edge

    Couchbase’s Managed Database Services: Computing at the Edge

    Let’s say you’re a passenger on a cruise ship. Floating in the middle of the ocean, far from reliable Wi-Fi, you wear a device that lets you into your room, that discreetly tracks your move from the bar to the dinner table to the pool and delivers your drink order wherever you are. You can buy sunscreen or toothpaste or souvenirs in the ship’s stores without touching anything.

    If you’re a Carnival Cruise Lines passenger, this is reality right now, in part because of the company’s partnership with Couchbase, according to Mark Gamble, product and solutions marketing director, Couchbase.

    Couchbase provides a cloud native, no SQL database technology that's used to power applications for customers including Carnival but also Amadeus, Comcast, LinkedIn, and Tesco.

    In Carnival’s case, Gamble said, “they run an edge data center on their ships to power their Ocean Medallion application, which they are super proud of. They use it a lot in their ads, because it provides a personalized service, which is a differentiator for them to their customers.”

    In this episode of The New Stack Makers, Gamble spoke to Heather Joslyn, features editor of TNS, about edge computing, 5G, and Couchbase Capella, its Database as a Service (DBaaS) offering for enterprises.

    This episode of Makers was sponsored by Couchbase.

    • 25 min
    Open Source Underpins A Home Furnishings Provider’s Global Ambitions

    Open Source Underpins A Home Furnishings Provider’s Global Ambitions

    Wayfair describes itself as the “the destination for all things home: helping everyone, anywhere create their feeling of home.” It provides an online platform to acquire home furniture, outdoor decor and other furnishings. It also supports its suppliers so they can use the platform to sell their home goods, explained Natali Vlatko, global lead, open source program office (OSPO) and senior software engineering manager, for Wayfair as the featured guest in Detroit during KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2022.

    • 16 min
    ML Can Prevent Getting Burned For Kubernetes Provisioning

    ML Can Prevent Getting Burned For Kubernetes Provisioning

    In the rush to create, provision and manage Kubernetes, often left out is proper resource provisioning. According to StormForge, a company paying, for example, a million dollars a month on cloud computing resources is likely wasting $6 million a year of resources on the cloud on Kubernetes that are left unused. The reasons for this are manifold and can vary. They include how DevOps teams can tend to estimate too conservatively or aggressively or overspend on resource provisioning. In this podcast with StormForge’s Yasmin Rajabi, vice president of product management, and Patrick Bergstrom CTO, we look at how to properly provision Kubernetes resources and the associated challenges. The podcast was recorded live in Detroit during KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe 2022.

    Patrick Bergstrom - https://www.linkedin.com/in/bergstrompatrick/
    Yasmin Rajabi - https://www.linkedin.com/in/yasminrajabi/
    Bruce Gain - @bcamerongain
    The New Stack - @thenewstack

    • 15 min
    What’s the Future of Feature Management?

    What’s the Future of Feature Management?

    Feature management isn’t a new idea but lately it’s a trend that’s picked up speed. Analysts like Forrester and Gartner have cited adoption of the practice as being, respectively, “hot” and “the dominant approach to experimentation in software engineering.”

    A study released in November found that 60% of 1,000 software and IT professionals surveyed started using feature flags only in the past year, according to the report sponsored by LaunchDarkly, the feature management platform and conducted by Wakefield Research.

    At the heart of feature management are feature flags, which give organizations the ability to turn features on and off, without having to re-deploy an entire app. Feature flags allow organizations test new features, and control things like access to premium versions of a customer-facing service.

    An overall feature management practice that includes feature flags allows organizations “to release progressively any new feature to any segment of users, any environment, any cohort of customers in a controlled manner that really reduces the risk of each release,” said Ravi Tharisayi, senior director of product marketing at LaunchDarkly, in this episode of The New Stack Makers podcast.

    Tharisayi talked to The New Stack’s features editor, Heather Joslyn, about the future of feature management, on the eve of the company’s latest Trajectory user conference. This episode of Makers was sponsored by LaunchDarkly.

    • 27 min
    Chronosphere Nudges Observability Standards Toward Maturity

    Chronosphere Nudges Observability Standards Toward Maturity

    DETROIT — Rob Skillington’s grandfather was a civil engineer, working in an industry that, in over a century, developed processes and know-how that enabled the creation of buildings, bridges and road.

    “A lot of those processes matured to a point where they could reliably build these things,” said Skillington, co-founder and chief technology officer at Chronosphere,an observability platform. “And I think about observability as that same maturity of engineering practice. When it comes to building software that actually is useful in the world, it is this process that helps you actually achieve the deployment and operation of these large scale systems that we use every day.”

    Skillington spoke about the evolution of observability, and his company’s recent donation of an open source project to Prometheus, in this episode of The New Stack Makers podcast. Heather Joslyn, features editor of TNS, hosted the conversation.

    This On the Road edition of The New Stack Makers was recorded at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America in the Motor City. The episode was sponsored by Chronosphere.

    • 15 min
    How Boeing Uses Cloud Native

    How Boeing Uses Cloud Native

    In this latest podcast from The New Stack, we spoke with Ricardo Torres, who is the chief engineer of open source and cloud native for aerospace giant Boeing. Torres also joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation in May to serve as a board member. In this interview, recorded at KubeCon+CloudNativeCon last month, Torres speaks about Boeing's use of open source software, as well as its adoption of cloud native technologies.

    • 12 min

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