10 episodes

Ever since it was founded in 1683, the Ashmolean Museum has been a place where academics and researchers come to study and be inspired by the collections.

Take a closer look at the Ashmolean's hidden treasures from the viewpoint of the experts. Academics from across the University of Oxford have chosen an object that relates to their research, revealing a whole world of ideas behind a single artefact. We hope that these specially curated podcasts, created by some of the University of Oxford's greatest minds, will encourage you to seek out your own hidden treasure in our vast collection.

Visit the Ashmolean collection and look out for the purple podcast leaflet and signage in the gallery to find the associated objects.

We are enormously grateful to Professor Raymond Dwek, CBE, FRS for his generous support of this new podcast project.

Thinking with Things: The Oxford Collection Oxford University

    • Courses

Ever since it was founded in 1683, the Ashmolean Museum has been a place where academics and researchers come to study and be inspired by the collections.

Take a closer look at the Ashmolean's hidden treasures from the viewpoint of the experts. Academics from across the University of Oxford have chosen an object that relates to their research, revealing a whole world of ideas behind a single artefact. We hope that these specially curated podcasts, created by some of the University of Oxford's greatest minds, will encourage you to seek out your own hidden treasure in our vast collection.

Visit the Ashmolean collection and look out for the purple podcast leaflet and signage in the gallery to find the associated objects.

We are enormously grateful to Professor Raymond Dwek, CBE, FRS for his generous support of this new podcast project.

    • video
    Tombstone of a Muslim girl

    Tombstone of a Muslim girl

    On what were people’s feelings about death and the dead in North Africa a thousand years ago? What does this tombstone tell us? With Professor Julia Bray, Arabic, University of Oxford. Object number: EA2006.21

    • 3 min
    • video
    Portrait of Mademoiselle Claus by Édouard Manet

    Portrait of Mademoiselle Claus by Édouard Manet

    Are Eastern Art and Western Art basically the same, and what is painting for? On Édouard Manet, Cézanne and their similarity to Chinese paintings. With Professor Craig Clunas Art History, University of Oxford. Object number: WA2012.53

    • 3 min
    • video
    Carved Stone Ball

    Carved Stone Ball

    We still do not know why these stone balls were created. They date to the late Neolithic or early Bronze Age, between 3200 and 1500 BC. They are made of various types of rock, such as sandstone or granite. Could they have been made by ancient mathematicians? With Professor Marcus Du Sautoy, Mathematics, University of Oxford. Object number: AN1927.2727

    • 1 min
    • video
    Mummified Child

    Mummified Child

    On growing up and dying in ancient and modern populations. What can we learn about the lives of ancient populations and how does this compare to modern societies? The boy lived during the Roman period of ancient Egypt (AD80–120), a time we know a lot about due to the Romans taking censuses and records of illness. With Professor Sarah Harper, Gerontology, University of Oxford.
    Object number: AN1888.820

    • 3 min
    • video
    Ennui by Walter Richard Sickert

    Ennui by Walter Richard Sickert

    On Viginia Woolf's interpretation of Walter Sickert's painting of Ennui. Virginia Woolf, the famous author, wrote an essay 'Walter Sickert: a conversation' on the painting of Ennui by Walter Richard Sickert in 1933. Woolf describes how she imagines the characters in the painting as an old publican, 'with his glass on the table before him and a cigar at his lips.' With Professor Dame Hermione Lee, English Literature, University of Oxford.
    Object number: WA1940.1.92

    • 3 min
    • video
    Silver-gilt carriage clock

    Silver-gilt carriage clock

    This travelling calendar carriage clock dates to 1747–1823. Why would such a clock need to have both lunar and sun time represented on it? With Professor Chris Lintott Astrophysics, University of Oxford. Object number: WA1949.134

    • 2 min

Top Podcasts In Courses

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by Oxford University