18 episodes

Bollywood tunes make compulsive hummers out of us. But wait, do you know the meaning of every word you hum? Especially the ones in Urdu? Urdunama, with @FabehaSyed, takes one word at a time and we slice and dice it for you.

Urdunama The Quint

    • Arts

Bollywood tunes make compulsive hummers out of us. But wait, do you know the meaning of every word you hum? Especially the ones in Urdu? Urdunama, with @FabehaSyed, takes one word at a time and we slice and dice it for you.

    18: Don’t Lose Hope: Poetry Of ‘Aas’ is a Reminder – This Too Shall Pass

    18: Don’t Lose Hope: Poetry Of ‘Aas’ is a Reminder – This Too Shall Pass

    In a matter of weeks, the exponential rise of coronavirus cases has caused anxiety and fear over the world. A lot of us are, quite naturally, feeling uncertain about the future.
    It’s easy to feel despair and be hopeless – but remember, we are all in this together. So, hang in there!
    Tune in for some ashaar – from the likes of Ahmad Faraz and Faiz – that will give the warmth of hope, or aas, that we all are in need of.
    Host, Writer and Sound Designer: Fabeha Syed
    Editor: Shelly Walia

    • 12 min
    17: Sahir Ludhianvi: A Poet Who Sought Closure In Love With A ‘Khubsoorat Mod’

    17: Sahir Ludhianvi: A Poet Who Sought Closure In Love With A ‘Khubsoorat Mod’

    A poet, lyricist, thinker - Sahir, is not a man of a few words. His vast vocabulary not only borrows references from nature when he writes intimate love songs but also when he hopes for a better world, social justice, and equality: 
    Hazaar barq gire, laakh andhiyan utthein
    Vo phool khil ke rahenge jo khilne wale hain.
    The magic of Sahir’s poetry is such that it traverses across the Urdu-Hindi barrier and across a range of complex human emotions. His nazms like Khoon phir khoon hai, Gandhi ho ya Ghalib ho, Wo subh kabhi to aayegi, are commentaries against social oppression and injustice which continue to resonate even today.
    In this episode of Urdunama, The Quint’s Fabeha Syed takes you through the life and time of Sahir Ludhianvi who is remembered for his evergreen songs like Kabhi Kabhi mere dil mein, Jaane kya toone kahin, Allah tero naam Ishwar tero naam, and many more.
    Meet Sahir in this special podcast. 
    Sound Design, Script, and Host: Fabeha Syed
    Vocals: Vikram Venkateswaran
    Editor: Shelly Walia

    • 18 min
    16: The Magic of Dawn: 'Sahar' and 'Sehr' in Urdu Poetry

    16: The Magic of Dawn: 'Sahar' and 'Sehr' in Urdu Poetry

    In most languages, there are those confusing words that have similar pronunciation but are different in both meanings and spellings. So if you stumble upon some homonyms in Urdu which make you scratch your head, say no more.
    We got you covered.
    In this episode of Urdunama, The Quint’s Fabeha Syed explains the case of almost similar sounding words - ‘sahar’ which means ‘dawn’, and ‘sehr’ meaning ‘magic’.
    Also featuring in this podcast is a journalist and poet Noman Shauq who not only shares with us some of the gems of Urdu poetry but also tells us who did Faiz Ahmad Faiz write “ye sahir aankhein” for in his poem Raqeeb Se.
    Tune in.
    Sound Designer, Producer, and Host: Fabeha Syed
    Guest: Noman Shauq
    Editor: Shelly Walia

    • 15 min
    15: Urdu Poetry And The Strength of Our Choices – Our 'Intikhab'

    15: Urdu Poetry And The Strength of Our Choices – Our 'Intikhab'

    Intikhab means ‘election’ or ‘selection’. Many Urdu poets have written about their intikhab of something when they are faced with tough choices. Mostly its when they hold someone or something like a memory in high regard. For example, Urdu poet Mir Taqi Mir, who shifted to Lucknow after Ahmad Shah Abdali’s invasion of Delhi, reminisces about his beloved city by calling it the ‘chosen place in the world for the nobility’. Mir writes:
    Dilli jo ek sheher tha aalam mein intekhaab
    Rehte the jahan muntakhib hi rozgar ke
    Tune in to this episode of Urdunama where Fabeha Syed not only explains Mir’s above ashar, but also explains various contexts - from political to personal - in which the word intikhab has been used by the poets.

    • 12 min
    14: The True Legacy of Kaifi Azmi: Poetry of Romance and Revolution

    14: The True Legacy of Kaifi Azmi: Poetry of Romance and Revolution

    On 14 January 1919, Urdu poet Kaifi Azmi was born into a family of zameendars of Mizwan – a small village in the district of Azamgarh, Uttar Pradesh.
    While the usual worries that grip every child’s heart are either about what, where or with whom to play, Kaifi’s anxieties lay elsewhere. One of the couplets from the first ghazal he wrote at the age of 11 shows the genius of a child prodigy that he was.
    Itna toh zindagi mein kisi ki khalal pade,
    Hasne se ho sukoon na rone se kal pade
    With his deep understanding of the tragedy of human life and its expectations, Kaifi became the voice of the voiceless – of the marginalised. His poetry talked about social justice, equality of opportunities, and gender justice. 
    On his birth anniversary on 14 January, we remember the progressive writer, who was both a revolutionary and a romantic. Tune in to listen to the new episode of the podcast series – Urdunama!
    Script Editor: Shelly Walia
    Podcast Producer & Editor: Fabeha Syed

    • 14 min
    13: Explained: Faiz Ahmad Faiz’s 'Hum Dekhenge' And The Power of Eternal Truth

    13: Explained: Faiz Ahmad Faiz’s 'Hum Dekhenge' And The Power of Eternal Truth

    Faiz’s iconic poem ‘Hum Dekhenge’ has always been borrowed by protesting voices across the globe. The poem calls out the oppressors of every age, ideology and society.
    The poem was written as a mark of protest against the regime of Pakistani dictator Zia-ul-Haq, whose government was communal and regressive. A set of laws called the ‘Hudood Ordinances’ was the central policy of his government to ensure proper ‘Islamisation’ of Pakistan.
    Hudood, or Hadd, means ‘limits’, and the law ordered the people of Pakistan to identify and remain well within the limits defined by the government. It is this religious fundamentalism that prompted Faiz to pen ‘Hum Dekhenge’ — a song that has since been the voice of Inquilaab or revolution.
    Recently, this piece of poetry found its critics who alleged that the poem has an orthodox Islamic character because of a few lines written in it.
    In this episode of Urdunama, The Quint’s Fabeha Syed explains the poem for you. And how using Islamic imagery, Faiz not only attacks the ultra-Islamic regime of Pakistani dictator Zia-ul-Haq, but also invokes the power of eternal truth and justice.
    Tune in.

    • 17 min

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