127 episodes

Photography has evolved into something more than an aggregation of pixels. Photographer/Photo Editor Sarah Jacobs and PhotoShelter co-founder Allen Murabayashi discuss photography and its intersection with culture and technology in this weekly podcast. From facial recognition to the photographers capturing Beyoncé, Vision Slightly Blurred will help you see photography through a new lens.

Vision Slightly Blurred PhotoShelter

    • Arts

Photography has evolved into something more than an aggregation of pixels. Photographer/Photo Editor Sarah Jacobs and PhotoShelter co-founder Allen Murabayashi discuss photography and its intersection with culture and technology in this weekly podcast. From facial recognition to the photographers capturing Beyoncé, Vision Slightly Blurred will help you see photography through a new lens.

    Did an Italian Student Plagiarize an Ethiopian Artist at the Milano Photo Festival?

    Did an Italian Student Plagiarize an Ethiopian Artist at the Milano Photo Festival?

    The 2021 Milan Photo Festival catalog includes a group exhibition by students at the Istituto Italiano Fotografia on the topic of Dante's Inferno. One of the students, Andrea Sacchetti, produced an image that is virtually identical to a well-known image by Ethiopian artist Aïda Muluneh without attribution.

    After @AFWomeninPhoto tweeted about the plagiarism, photo Twitter shook its collective head in dismay, and the Festival issued a statement that "here was no will to plagiarize against such a prestigious author." Nevertheless, Sacchetti's images remain in the exhibition. Muluneh subsequently issued a video response in which she stated "Just because there’s been one post shared and a couple of messages sent, it’s not the end of the conversation."

    Also in the show: Nicola Dove captures Daniel Craig in his final outing as James Bond in "No Time to Die" and you can support the rebuilding of South Louisiana following the destruction of Hurricane Ida through PhotographsForLouisiana.com

    • 19 min
    Street Photography's Snakes on a Train?

    Street Photography's Snakes on a Train?

    An image of a young mother in a short dress on a New York City subway raised ethical questions and the ire of some commentators on Twitter. Some found the "award-winning" photo to be stunning, while others questioned the photographer's methods – sitting across from the woman for 45 minutes while holding his camera on his lap.

    Unlike the conversation around "newsworthy" images and the First Amendment, street photography often occupies a much creepier and ethically ambiguous space. But what exactly made this image so objectionable? Sarah and Allen discuss.

    Also on the show: Emily Ratajkowski tries using the Fair Use defense in her copyright infringement suit, World Press Photo shifts to a regional model, and photographer/director Joshua Kissi says LinkedIn is the real social network for pros. 

    • 29 min
    How Magnum Photos' Jonas Bendiksen Nearly Fooled the Entire Industry

    How Magnum Photos' Jonas Bendiksen Nearly Fooled the Entire Industry

    Magnum photographer Jonas Bendiksen was troubled by potential for photographers to fabricate a story and photos from scratch using technology and social media to propagate a false narrative. He was so frightened that he "decided to try to to this myself."

    The Book of Veles was a conceptual exercise built from background plates photographed in Northern Macedonia and computer generated people. No one in the photojournalism industry seemed to notice, and Bendiksen was even offered an evening presentation at Visa Pour L'Image. But an eagle-eyed Benjamin Chesterton (@duckrabbitblog) spotted a social media avatar that matched one of the subjects in the book, and the intentionally deceptive tale unraveled.

    In this episode of Vision Slightly Blurred, Sarah and Allen discuss the reaction to the project and the ethical lines that it crosses.

    In addition: Paul Ratje's misinterpreted images of Haitian migrants on the US/Mexico border, Instagram postponed the launch of Instagram Kids, and the New York Public Library keeps its image collection open for public browsing.

    • 26 min
    Christo's Arc de Triomphe: What Role Does Photography Play in Ephemeral Art?

    Christo's Arc de Triomphe: What Role Does Photography Play in Ephemeral Art?

    60 years in the making, Christo's Wrapped Arc de Triomphe opened over the weekend – thrilling Parisians with the artist's first posthumous piece since his death in 2020.  But the installation will only be on display until October 3, after which the pieces will be struck and recycled. Like all of Christo's works, the art lives on in sketches, plans, and photos. 

    In this episode of Vision Slightly Blurred, Sarah and Allen discuss the role of photography in ephemeral art and compare other works by Ai Wei Wei and Banksy.

    Also on the show, Photoville celebrates The New York Times staff photographer Michelle Agins, Facebook knows Instagram is toxic, and Sebastian Salgado wins the Premium Imperiale 2021 award.

    • 25 min
    The Photos of 9/11 – Twenty Years Later

    The Photos of 9/11 – Twenty Years Later

    With the benefit of two decades of hindsight, Sarah and Allen re-examine the "iconic" photos from September 11 and talk about the need for photographers to re-share their images and experiences with others. 

    In the episode, we look at photos from Steven Pyke, Aristede Economopoulos, Stan Honda, James Nachtwey, Suzanne Plunkett, Shannon Stapleton, Robert Clark, Alex Webb, Richard Drew, Robert Clark and more.

    • 36 min
    Simu Liu – the Star of Marvel's Shang-Chi – Was a Stock Photo Model

    Simu Liu – the Star of Marvel's Shang-Chi – Was a Stock Photo Model

    Simu Liu, the Chinese-Canadian actor who stars in Marvel's latest blockbuster, revealed that he was once paid $100 to be a stock photo model. Since that single photo shoot in 2014, Liu says he has seen himself on ads hawking everything from software to YMCA memberships. His advice: Think twice before doing a stock photo shoot.

    Also in the show: Adam Ferguson documents climate change for TIME over the course of 5 weeks, more and more photographers are publishing newsletters using tools like Substack and Facebook's Bulletin, Facebook apologizes for comparing Black men to primates, and Apple puts its child safety features on pause after experts weigh in.

    • 27 min

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