300 episodes

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American . To view all of our archived podcasts please go to www.scientificamerican.com/podcast

60-Second Science Scientific American

    • Science

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American . To view all of our archived podcasts please go to www.scientificamerican.com/podcast

    Help Researchers Track COVID-19

    Help Researchers Track COVID-19

    By entering your health status, even if you’re feeling fine, at the Web site COVID Near You, you can help researchers develop a nationwide look at where hotspots of coronavirus are occurring.

    • 2 min
    Sick Vampire Bats Restrict Grooming to Close Family

    Sick Vampire Bats Restrict Grooming to Close Family

    When vampire bats feel sick, they still engage in prosocial acts such as sharing food with nonrelatives. But they cut back on grooming anyone other than their closest kin.

    • 2 min
    Exponential Infection Increases Are Deadly Serious

    Exponential Infection Increases Are Deadly Serious

    Listen in as I use two calculators to track the difference in numbers of infections over a short period of time, depending on how many people each infected individual infects on average.

    • 4 min
    Swamp Wallaby Reproduction Give Tribbles a Run

    Swamp Wallaby Reproduction Give Tribbles a Run

    They’re not born pregnant like tribbles, but swamp wallabies routinely get pregnant while pregnant.

    • 3 min
    Ocean Plastic Smells Great to Sea Turtles

    Ocean Plastic Smells Great to Sea Turtles

    Ocean plastic gets covered with algae and other marine organisms, making it smell delicious to sea turtles—with potentially deadly results.

    • 2 min
    Ancient Clam Shell Reveals Shorter Day Length

    Ancient Clam Shell Reveals Shorter Day Length

    The growth layers in a 70-million-year-old clam shell indicate that a year back then had more than 370 days, with each day being only about 23.5 hours.

    • 2 min

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