52 episodes

The Economist unlocks American politics, tackling a new theme each week and digging into the data, ideas, and history shaping the country at this dramatic moment.

John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman.

Correspondents from across the US and the rest of the world plus expert guests - politicians, pollsters, professors - join the in-depth reporting and discussion every Friday.

Checks and Balance The Economist

    • Politics

The Economist unlocks American politics, tackling a new theme each week and digging into the data, ideas, and history shaping the country at this dramatic moment.

John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman.

Correspondents from across the US and the rest of the world plus expert guests - politicians, pollsters, professors - join the in-depth reporting and discussion every Friday.

    Checks and Balance: On mute

    Checks and Balance: On mute

    In the last week of his presidency Donald Trump is being purged from the political mainstream. Congress has impeached him again. He has been booted off social media. A major golf tournament has been pulled from one of his courses. How should Donald Trump and his followers be held to account for damaging American democracy?


    We speak to Elizabeth Neumann, who led the counterterrorism office at the Department of Homeland Security, and Megan Squire, a professor of computer science at Elon University who tracks online extremism. The Economist correspondents Steven Mazie and Leo Mirani also join us.


    John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


    For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod
     
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    • 44 min
    Checks and Balance: American carnage

    Checks and Balance: American carnage

    President Trump stood on the Capitol steps at his inauguration and promised to stop “this American carnage.” Four years later a violent mob stormed the Capitol building in an attempt to overturn his election defeat. Will this jarring spectacle make breaking with Mr Trump easier for Republicans? 


    We hear from historian Rick Perlstein, The Economist’s Washington bureau chief James Astill and Washington correspondent Idrees Kahloon.


    John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


    For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod
     
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    • 43 min
    Checks and Balance: Leaving today

    Checks and Balance: Leaving today

    New York became the epicentre of the pandemic when it first hit America. More than 25,000 New Yorkers have died of covid-19. An estimated 300,000 have left the city as its health infrastructure stretched beyond capacity, schools closed, and crime spiked. The loss of commuters and tourists leaves a huge hole in the city's finances. But the city has bounced back from bankruptcy, and worse, before. Can it recover in 2021?


    We speak to funeral director Sal Farenga and Kelley Cabrera, a nurse in The Bronx. Kathryn Wylde of The Partnership for New York City tells us recovery is not guaranteed.


    John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


    For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/2020electionpod 
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 43 min
    Checks and Balance: The unfinished revolution

    Checks and Balance: The unfinished revolution

    After the defeat of the Confederacy and the end of slavery in 1865, the period known as Reconstruction was a chance to create a multiracial democracy and for America to live up to the promise made at its founding. It ended in failure. But in establishing the idea that the federal government should act as a guarantor of individual liberties it planted the seeds of that democracy. America’s second revolution remains unfinished.


    Our end-of-year special episode asks what the history of Reconstruction reveals about 2020’s reckoning on race. 


    We talk to Eric Foner, the leading historian of Reconstruction, Kimberlé Crenshaw of the African American Policy Forum, and Aderson Francois, a Georgetown law professor.


    John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


    For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/2020electionpod
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 37 min
    Checks and Balance: On my mind

    Checks and Balance: On my mind

    As 2020 draws to a close, the partisan feud is focused on Georgia. Joe Biden was the first Democrat in 28 years to win the state on the way to the White House. Run-off elections on January 5th will decide who controls the Senate - and Biden’s agenda. They will also test Donald Trump’s hold on his party as he refuses to admit defeat. Will Georgia tip the balance of American politics?


    Pablo Montagnes of Emory University lays out Georgia’s political geography, Congresswoman-elect Nikema Williams and State Senator Jen Jordan account for the Democrats’ success, and Congressman Tom Graves assesses Republican fortunes. 


    John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


    For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/2020electionpod
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 38 min
    Checks and Balance: Using my religion

    Checks and Balance: Using my religion

    A ruling lifting covid restrictions on places of worship suggests the Supreme Court will favour religious rights even as faithlessness is rising. The court’s realignment may be Donald Trump’s most enduring legacy. How is the balance between religion and politics shifting in America?


    David French of The Dispatch explains how secularisation lays a religious rift onto the political one, we find out why the French president is carping at America over secularism, and how Joe Biden will navigate this tricky territory.


    John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


    For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/2020electionpod
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 41 min

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