55 episodes

The Journal podcasts take you on a tour of hot topics in the world of food and nutrition. Each podcast provides insightful interviews and commentary from authors and nutrition experts on featuredJournal articles and topics that are at the forefront of dietetics research and practice, public nutrition policy, and consumer advice.
Views and opinions expressed in these podcasts are those of the participants and do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions, or policies of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics or Elsevier.

Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Author Podcast Various

    • Science

The Journal podcasts take you on a tour of hot topics in the world of food and nutrition. Each podcast provides insightful interviews and commentary from authors and nutrition experts on featuredJournal articles and topics that are at the forefront of dietetics research and practice, public nutrition policy, and consumer advice.
Views and opinions expressed in these podcasts are those of the participants and do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions, or policies of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics or Elsevier.

    Decreasing Trends in Heavy Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption in the United States, 2003–2016

    Decreasing Trends in Heavy Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption in the United States, 2003–2016

    Authors: by Kelsey A. Vercammen, MSc, Alyssa J. Moran, ScD, RD, Mark J. Soto, MA, Lee Kennedy-Shaffer, PhD, and Sara N. Bleich, PhD
    Podcast: Lead author Kelsey A. Vercammen (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) talks about a new Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics study that shows the percentage of heavy sugar-sweetened beverage drinkers trended downwards in most demographic categories, but attention should be paid to several subgroups with high intake for whom trends are not decreasing.
    September 24, 2020 (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2020.07.012

    Types and Amounts of Nonnutritive Sweeteners Purchased by US Households: A Comparison of 2002 and 2018 Nielsen Homescan Purchases

    Types and Amounts of Nonnutritive Sweeteners Purchased by US Households: A Comparison of 2002 and 2018 Nielsen Homescan Purchases

    Authors: Elizabeth K. Dunford, PhD; Donna R. Miles, PhD; Shu Wen Ng, PhD, and Barry Popkin, PhD
    Podcast: Reducing sugar consumption is an important public health strategy. Shu Wen Ng, PhD, discusses a new study from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill that shows US household purchases of foods and beverages containing caloric sweeteners declined between 2002 and 2018 but increased for products with both caloric sweeteners and artificial sweeteners.
    July 29, 2020 (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2020.04.022)

    Added Sugars Intake among US Infants and Toddlers

    Added Sugars Intake among US Infants and Toddlers

    Authors:Authors: Kirsten A. Herrick, PhD, MSc, Cheryl D. Fryar, MSPH, Heather C. Hamner, PhD, MS, MPH, Sohyun Park, PhD, and Cynthia L. Ogden, PhD, MRP
    Podcast: Lead investigator Kirsten A. Herrick, PhD, MSc, highlights findings from the first study to look at trends in added sugars consumption by toddlers and infants. Nearly two-thirds of infants (61 percent) and almost all toddlers (98 percent) consumed added sugars in their average daily diets, primarily in the form of flavored yogurts (infants) and fruit drinks (toddlers). November 14, 2019 (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2019.09.007)

    Variations in Marginal Taste Perception by Body Mass Index Classification: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Variations in Marginal Taste Perception by Body Mass Index Classification: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Authors: Aaron C. Miller, PhD; Linnea A. Polgreen, PhD; Elena M. Segre, MD; and Philip M. Polgreen, MD, MPH
    Podcast: Linnea A. Polgreen, PhD, and Aaron C. Miller, PhD, discuss a new study from the University of Iowa that shows levels of satisfaction derived from food differ among adults who were normal-weight, overweight, and obese and that individuals with obesity get more satisfaction from their food. This quantification of satisfaction from food may help explain why some people eat more than others. July 30, 2019 (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2019.05.018)

    • video
    Fast Food Offerings in the United States in 1986, 1991, and 2016 Show Large Increases in Food Variety, Portion Size, Dietary Energy, and Selected Micronutrients

    Fast Food Offerings in the United States in 1986, 1991, and 2016 Show Large Increases in Food Variety, Portion Size, Dietary Energy, and Selected Micronutrients

    Authors: Megan A. McCrory, PhD; Allen G Harbaugh, PhD; Sarah Appeadu, MS; and Susan B Roberts, PhD
    Video: Dr. Megan McCrory and colleagues present new insights on how fast food may be helping to fuel the continuing problem of obesity and related chronic conditions in the US. They examined changes over a 30-year period of menu items offered by 10 of the top fast-food restaurants.
    February 27, 2019 (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2018.12.004)

    Foods and Beverages Obtained at Worksites in the United States

    Foods and Beverages Obtained at Worksites in the United States

    Authors: Stephen J. Onufrak, PhD, Hatidza Zaganjor, MPH, Liping Pan, MD, MPH, Seung Hee Lee-Kwan, PhD, Sohyun Park, PhD, and Diane M. Harris, PhD, MPH
    Podcast: What proportion of US adults obtain food at work, what foods do they obtain, and what is the dietary quality of these foods? Listen to results from a new study led by Stephen J. Onufrak, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. January 22, 2019 (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2018.11.011)

Top Podcasts In Science

Listeners Also Subscribed To