55 episodes

Radicals & Revolutionaries Lab is an intersectional, international, and intergenerational podcast with feminist visionaries. Secrets are had and shared in conversation with revolutionaries and innovators engaged in distinctly unapologetic feminist work. The R&R Lab unearths those nuggets of truth hidden just under the surface, begging to be noticed. We dive deeply into animating questions at the center of our feminist life; exploring the complexity and nuance that emboldens our listeners to engage in new ways of seeing, defining, and being feminists. 683903
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Radicals & Revolutionaries Lab Jillian Foster

    • News

Radicals & Revolutionaries Lab is an intersectional, international, and intergenerational podcast with feminist visionaries. Secrets are had and shared in conversation with revolutionaries and innovators engaged in distinctly unapologetic feminist work. The R&R Lab unearths those nuggets of truth hidden just under the surface, begging to be noticed. We dive deeply into animating questions at the center of our feminist life; exploring the complexity and nuance that emboldens our listeners to engage in new ways of seeing, defining, and being feminists. 683903
Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/radicals-and-revolutionaries-lab.

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    Carmen Rojas

    Carmen Rojas

    This week's Revolutionary is Dr. Carmen Rojas, President and CEO of the Marguerite Casey Foundation. She's also the Co-Founder and former CEO of The Workers Lab, where she dedicated herself to improving the living conditions of low-wage workers. Her mission to level the playing field and create opportunities for those who wouldn't otherwise have them is informed by decades of lived experience as a first-generation Latina American witnessing how opportunities for impoverished people and people of color have changed over the years.
    Our discussion covers a wide array of topics, including her plans for the future of Marguerite Casey, how the philanthropy industry has begun to imitate the private sector, where myths around homelessness originate, and why creating enduring social change is a long-term investment without a set dollar amount return.
    Some Questions I Ask:
    How are you reimagining philanthropy? (1:14)Where does your passion for change come from? (9:08)What is the connection between workers' rights, building wealth, and housing? (16:18)Why don't Americans see homeless people as a part of their community? (22:56)What sparked the idea for the Workers Lab? (25:09)What is your vision of the future for the Marguerite Casey Foundation? (34:06)
    In The Episode, You Will Learn:
    How philanthropy in the 21st century resembles the private sector—and why this is a problem (3:50)How companies can make a difference by investing in their employees (10:52)How the myths around homelessness began to take root (19:42)How we sacrifice social values for the sake of the already-wealthy (28:09)How society gaslights the poor into believing they deserve poverty (31:41)Carmen's thoughts on being part of the first Latina-to-Latina leadership transition in the history of US philanthropic organizations (33:27)Why social change is a long-term investment (38:54)
    Resources:
    Carmen's Twitter
    Marguerite Casey Foundation
    The Workers Lab
    "The Problems With Philanthropy, and What We Can Do to Fix Them" by Carmen Rojas, PhD.
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    • 49 min
    Kiley May

    Kiley May

    This week's Radical is Kiley May. Kiley May is Hotinonhshón:ni, Kanien'kehá:ka (Mohawk) and turtle clan from Six Nations reserve, and is now rooted in Aterón:to (Toronto). She is a two spirit Indigenous transgender multidisciplinary artist and storyteller—a writer and author, an actor, emerging screenwriter and filmmaker. Kiley is also an activist and educator, committed to equality, representation, diversity and inclusion. She's appeared in It Chapter Two (2019) as well as a recurring role on the CBC series Coroner (2019-), and is currently working on a book (tentatively titled How to Love a Trans Girl) and a short film trilogy that she will write and direct.
    In this episode we cover the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality that inform Kiley's work and outlook, her journey from journalism school to the screen, growing up in the Hotinonhshón:ni Mohawk culture on Six Nations, how she came up with her own take on the Bechdel Test, why some people think being Two-Spirit is a Toronto thing, and more.
    Some Questions I Ask:
    How does screenwriting work? (2:46)What does having a "kaleidoscope identity" mean for you? (16:38)What is Two-Spirit? (27:03)What is the May Test? (35:17)What can you tell me about How to Love a Trans Girl? (43:42)In This Episode, You Will Learn:
    How Kiley made the transition from journalism to performing (4:38)About Kiley's experience growing up on Six Nations (6:46)Why it's important for people to be willing to take initiative to seek out information about queer identities (22:03)Why the term Two-Spirit is controversial among indigenous people (30:56)How being a filmmaker allows Kiley the opportunity to help shift narratives around trans lives (43:31)About Kiley's upcoming short film trilogy (46:39)Resources:
    Kiley's Twitter
    "Trans Women Deserve To Be Loved Proudly. Straight Guys, I'm Looking At You." (Huffington Post article written by Kiley May.)
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    • 51 min
    Charlie Grosso

    Charlie Grosso

    This week's revolutionary is Charlie Grosso, a Chinese-American photographer and the creator of Hello Future, an educational non-profit that promotes digital literacy for refugees.
    Our conversation goes from the roots of Hello Future and how a Chinese woman ended up with an Italian male name, to the beginnings of her photography career, what a theatre degree really is, and why the notion of a "digitally native" generation is a myth.
    Some Questions I Ask:
    Where did your path begin? (4:02)Do you think you've grown into a new person by becoming Charlie Grosso? (8:34)How and When did the Wok the Dog photo series begin? (14:02)How did you hone your photography? (18:36)Where do you find resistance in your work? (21:43)How did Hello Future begin? (27:55)How can people support Hello Future? (45:42)
    In This Episode, You Will Learn:
    How Charlie came to America (5:15)Where the name Charlie Grosso came to be (7:07)How a theatre degree is actually a degree in making something out of nothing, and how this relates to starting a business (12:04)How the challenge of identity as an Asian-American woman shaped Charlie's art (20:16)Why linguistic prescriptivism is stifling to creativity (23:49)The relationship between refugees and mobile devices (30:58)The need for digital literacy and how it differs from digital consumerism (37:05)
    Resources
    Charlie Grosso's website
    Hello Future
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    • 49 min
    Blair Imani

    Blair Imani

    This week's radical is Blair Imani, historian, author, educator, activist, podcaster, social media influencer... seriously, there's not much she can't do. Her new podcast with Kate Robards, America Did What?!, tackles difficult subjects in American history through a lens of feminism and anti-racism, blending biting commentary with slapstick comedy.
    In our discussion, we cover the challenges of podcasting, growing up in deeply religious households, challenging authority, exploring new religions, and the connections between Star Trek analysis and religious interpretation.
    Some Questions I Ask:
    What gave you the push to start a new podcast? (3:16)How did you become a historian? (19:14)How did a Spanish immersion program in Chile factor into your college experience? (27:55)Do people ignore injustice to avoid reckoning with their own complicity? (34:32)What was it like to convert to Islam? (43:02)How do you feel about activism and feminism as a Muslim woman? (49:34)
    In This Episode You Will Learn:
    About Blair's new podcast, America Did What?!, and her forthcoming book (0:58)The importance of making history accessible (8:17)How racial dynamics differ between the eat coast and the west coast (14:12)The real reason Canada was a refuge for freed slaves (16:25)How two very different parents raised one very unique child (22:04)The importance of coming into a discussion prepared (24:19)Why it's hard to accept uncomfortable truths (35:58)How joining Islam was a rebellious act (48:29)How Gene Roddenberry's vision of a secular future in Star Trek is very low-stakes, and how this applies to religious interpretation (54:20)
    Resources:
    Blair's Website
    America Did What?! Podcast
    Making Our Way Home: The Great Migration and the Black American Dream (2020)
    Modern HERstory: Stories of Women and Nonbinary People Rewriting History (2018)
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    • 1 hr 6 min
    Fariba Nawa & Teri Yuan

    Fariba Nawa & Teri Yuan

    This week we're revisiting our Feminism in the Age of COVID-19 online event series that took place this past June and July. On June 12th we were joined by journalist and author Fariba Nawa and by En(Gender)ed Collective founder Teri Yuan.
    Together we discussed accountability for violence against women in different contexts and how this work has shifted during COVID-19. This conversation touches on how the issues surrounding domestic violence differ in the United States versus Turkey and the Middle East, and how to foster greater accountability moving forward.
    Some Questions I Ask:
    How do different cultures handle the issue of sexual and gender-based violence? (10:15)How do faith leaders factor in the fight against domestic violence? (14:08)How does the concept of accountability shift in different settings? (27:33)
    Audience Questions:
    Why is it important to approach this issue through a feminist lens? (40:06)How does the fact that for many women, the home is not a safe place, affect this discussion? (46:21)What is some advice for feminist allies who want to help? (52:40)
    In This Episode, You Will Learn:
    About Fariba Nawa and her work (6:18)About Teri Yuan and her work (8:03)How family and support systems help women to escape from violence (10:43)How domestic violence is more than just physical violence (20:42)How sexual violence is an expression of patriarchy's values (27:06)How increases in overall violence lead to increases in sexual and gender-based violence (28:02)Teri's three levels of accountability (32:23)How sexism is the last socially-acceptable form of oppression (36:47)
    Resources:
    Fariba's Website
    OnSpec Podcast
    En(Gender)ed Collective
    En(Gender)ed Podcast
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    • 1 hr 2 min
    Loretta Ross

    Loretta Ross

    This week's revolutionary is Loretta Ross, co-founder of the Reproductive Justice movement. She teaches "White Supremacy in the Age of Trump" at Smith College and is the author of a number of works, including Radical Reproductive Justice: Foundation, Theory, Practice, Critique (2017) and Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organizing for Reproductive Justice (2004).
    Our conversation covers decades of life experiences that led Loretta into social justice work, from growing up across the United States to "accidentally" becoming an activist; from deprogramming ex-Klansmen to becoming a college professor. And of course, we discuss the current state of activism work: why it's better to call in than call out, when to burn bridges, and how movements change and new generations create new rules.
    Some Questions I Ask:
    What is Reproductive Justice? (4:45)How did the experience of being a young parent shape you? (17:07)Where did you study? (20:13)How does your history inform your new work? (30:54)What's the difference between calling out and calling in? (38:41)
    In This Episode, You Will Learn:
    The challenges of teaching online (2:40)What the pro-life vs. pro-choice debate gets wrong (7:31)How the army schools Loretta attended were more racially diverse than public schools (13:18)How experiences with sexual violence shaped Loretta (TRIGGER WARNING, 14:47)How Loretta became the "accidental activist" (21:48)The challenges of deprogramming Klansmen (29:18)How new generations reinvent activism (31:44)The line between forgiving mistakes and condemning unapologetic harm (42:15)
    Resources:
    Loretta's Website
    Loretta J. Ross Papers, Smith College Libraries
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    • 47 min

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