300 episodes

Don’t get caught off guard by market crashes that can take all your money down with them. And don’t miss out on markets where you can build wealth practically overnight. Real Estate News for Investors with Kathy Fettke is the premiere source for savvy real estate investors who want to stay up-to-date on new laws, regulations, and economic events that affect real estate. Topics include: market trends, economic analysis that affects housing prices, updates on the best rental markets for investing in single-family rentals or multi-unit rentals, turn-key housing standards, the fate of the highly revered 1031 exchange and other tax law affecting investors, self-directed IRA investing and 401k changes, where rents and property values are rising or falling, flipping risks, new Dodd-Frank rules regarding private lending and financing standards, areas with job losses vs job growth, areas that are overbuilt or over-supplied versus areas with low supply and high demand, and how to avoid real estate scams.

We'll bring you the latest reports from organizations like the National Association of Realtors, Realty Trac, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, Zillow, Trulia, Redfin, Rent Range, Property Radar, the Norris Group, Peter Schiff, Robert Kiyosaki’s Rich Dad, Suse Orman, Bigger Pockets, Dave Ramsey and more. And we'll help you interpret the data in terms that make sense for your real estate goals, and portfolio. Grow and protect your wealth by staying on the forefront of economic data analysis, expert opinions, innovative investing strategies and profitable investment opportunities. We'll share all the top real estate news stories and the best trade secrets investors should know, so you can stay ahead of the curve and make fully informed real estate decisions.

Host Kathy Fettke is Co-CEO of the Real Wealth Network, author of Retire Rich with Rentals and host of the Real Wealth Show on iTunes. She brings decades of media and real estate investing experience, offers her own viewpoints on particular topics, and taps into her network of real estate experts for real world news updates created just for investors like you. Get the real news on real estate on Real Estate News For Investors podcast!

Like what you hear? Don't forget to subscribe! Love what you hear? Please leave us a review! Thanks for listening!

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast Kathy Fettke | RealWealth

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    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

Don’t get caught off guard by market crashes that can take all your money down with them. And don’t miss out on markets where you can build wealth practically overnight. Real Estate News for Investors with Kathy Fettke is the premiere source for savvy real estate investors who want to stay up-to-date on new laws, regulations, and economic events that affect real estate. Topics include: market trends, economic analysis that affects housing prices, updates on the best rental markets for investing in single-family rentals or multi-unit rentals, turn-key housing standards, the fate of the highly revered 1031 exchange and other tax law affecting investors, self-directed IRA investing and 401k changes, where rents and property values are rising or falling, flipping risks, new Dodd-Frank rules regarding private lending and financing standards, areas with job losses vs job growth, areas that are overbuilt or over-supplied versus areas with low supply and high demand, and how to avoid real estate scams.

We'll bring you the latest reports from organizations like the National Association of Realtors, Realty Trac, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, Zillow, Trulia, Redfin, Rent Range, Property Radar, the Norris Group, Peter Schiff, Robert Kiyosaki’s Rich Dad, Suse Orman, Bigger Pockets, Dave Ramsey and more. And we'll help you interpret the data in terms that make sense for your real estate goals, and portfolio. Grow and protect your wealth by staying on the forefront of economic data analysis, expert opinions, innovative investing strategies and profitable investment opportunities. We'll share all the top real estate news stories and the best trade secrets investors should know, so you can stay ahead of the curve and make fully informed real estate decisions.

Host Kathy Fettke is Co-CEO of the Real Wealth Network, author of Retire Rich with Rentals and host of the Real Wealth Show on iTunes. She brings decades of media and real estate investing experience, offers her own viewpoints on particular topics, and taps into her network of real estate experts for real world news updates created just for investors like you. Get the real news on real estate on Real Estate News For Investors podcast!

Like what you hear? Don't forget to subscribe! Love what you hear? Please leave us a review! Thanks for listening!

    Are We One Step Closer to National Rent Control?

    Are We One Step Closer to National Rent Control?

    The Biden Administration launched a broad-based effort by federal agencies to “improve the quality of life for renters.” The announcement comes at a time when 40% of renters are struggling to keep up with their rent payments, but raises questions about how to make housing affordable in a way that is fair for both renters and landlords. (1)
     
    Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.
     
    U.S. Rent Growth
     
    Rents have been soaring across the country, as housing demand continues to outpace supply, but it has also been slowing down as the Federal Reserve works to slow inflation with rate hikes. According to Zillow, typical U.S. asking rents are $1,981, which represents a yearly growth rate of 7.4%. That’s down from a peak of 17.1% last February. (2)
     
    Rents and rent growth vary wildly from market to market. In Miami, year-over-year rent growth is 11.7% while Las Vegas is showing a negative .9% increase. A few other examples include Cincinnati with a rent growth rate of 10.2% and Indianapolis, at 9.6%.
     
    Federal Renter Protection Effort
     
    Getting back to the renter protection announcement, let’s look at some of the top calls to action:
     
    1 - The Federal Trade Commission or FTC and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) will be investigating ways that tenants are being unfairly prevented from getting into housing or removed from housing they already have. Some of the practices they will be investigating include the use of background checks, tenant screening algorithms, adverse action notices for rejecting applicants, and information on an applicant’s source of income. 
     
    2 - Those two agencies will also issue guidance for the credit reporting process, and coordinate enforcement efforts to ensure the accuracy of the information. They will also hold background check companies accountable if they engage in unfair procedures.
     
    3 - The Federal Housing Finance Agency or FHFA will be involved with renter protections that include limits on excessive rent increases. The agency describes it as a public process that prioritizes transparency with updates, including one within the first six months. The FHFA will also encourage affordability for the multifamily market with affordability requirements for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac loans.
     
    4 - The Department of Justice is expected to issue guidance on the prevention of anti-competitive information sharing in the rental market.
     
    5 - The Department of Housing and Urban Development or HUD will work on new rules that require at least 30 days notice before a lease is terminated for a public housing tenant who stopped paying rent.
     
    6 - The Biden Administration plans to hold quarterly meetings with tenants and tenant advocates to make sure their voices are heard.
     
    Blueprint for Renters Bill of Rights
     
    All this is part of the so-called “Blueprint for a Renters Bill of Rights. The guiding principles include:
     
    1 - Safe, Quality, Accessible, and Affordable Housing
    2 - Clear and Fair Leases
    3 - Education, Enforcement, and Enhancement of Renter Rights
    4. - The Right to Organize
     
    Housing Providers Involvement
     
    Several housing provider groups are also participating in this effort.
     
    The National Association of Realtors or NAR and its affiliate, The Institute of Real Estate Management, have made a commitment to promote resident-centered property management practices. That might include the use of alternative credit scores for applicants who don’t have much of a credit history or the sharing of information with an applicant about Housing Choice Vouchers or rental assistance programs.
     
    The National Apartment Association and the National Multifamily Association have also made commitments to promote resident-centered management practices. That might include help for tenants who want to improve their credit scores by reporting positive ren

    • 7 min
    The Real Estate News Brief: Inflation Cools Off, Foreclosures Rising, Renting Affordability

    The Real Estate News Brief: Inflation Cools Off, Foreclosures Rising, Renting Affordability

    In this Real Estate News Brief for the week ending January 28th, 2023... what’s happening with inflation, a new surge in foreclosures, and the affordability of renting versus buying.
     
    Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.
     
    Economic News
     
    We begin with economic news from this past week. The latest report on the cost of goods and services shows that inflation is cooling off. The PCE index is the Federal Reserve’s preferred measure of inflation and it shows a tiny .1% increase for December. That reduces the annual rate from 5.5% to 5%. When you eliminate the cost of food and gas, the monthly increase was .3% with an annual rate that’s down from 4.7% to 4.4%. PCE stands for Personal Consumption Expenditures. (1)
     
    We also have a new report on the GDP. The government reports that the Gross Domestic Product grew at a solid 2.9% in the fourth quarter of last year. That’s after a reading of 3.2% in the third quarter, and two negative quarters in the beginning of 2022. Economists generally believe that we’ll see slower economic growth in 2023 due to the Fed’s rate hikes. The rate hikes are meant to slow the economy and help bring inflation back down to the 2% level. (2)
     
    The National Association of Home Builders reported on the housing share of the GDP which is lower than normal due to the constrained housing market conditions. The NAHB explains the two housing market components that contribute to the GDP as the residential fixed investment or RFI which includes home building and remodeling. The second component covers housing services like rent, utilities, and the cost that owners would have to pay to rent their own homes. For the fourth quarter the RFI was 4% of the economy while housing services accounted for 11.9%. That’s a total of 15.9% of the GDP. Historically, the total is 17 or 18% of the GDP with an average of 5% for the RFI and 12 to 13% for housing services. (3)
     
    Weekly jobless claims are down again, to their lowest level since April. Weekly initial claims dropped another 6,000 to a total of 186,000. Ongoing claims were up 20,000 to a total of 1.68 million. Several companies have announced layoffs but that hasn’t had an obvious impact yet on jobless claims. (4)
     
    New home sales were slightly higher in December. The Commerce Department says they were up 2.3% to a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 616,000. Year-over-year, they are down 26.6%. That hit a peak of 1.04 million in August of 2020. (5)
     
     Mortgage Rates
     
    Mortgage rates were down a little more last week. Freddie Mac says the average 30-year fixed rate mortgage was down 2 basis points to 6.13%. 15 year loans were down 11 points to 5.17%. (6)
     
    In other news making headlines...
     
    Foreclosure Rate Doubles
     
    Foreclosure rates are rising once again, but have not returned to pre-pandemic levels. ATTOM Data says they more than doubled in 2022 compared to 2021, with a 115% increase. In 2022, there were foreclosure filings on .23% of all housing units. In 2021, foreclosure filings accounted for just .11% Back in 2019, before the pandemic, they accounted for .36% of all properties. (7)
     
    ATTOM’s Rick Sharga says: “Government and mortgage industry efforts during the pandemic, coupled with a strong economy, have helped prevent millions of unnecessary foreclosures.”
     
    States with the highest number of foreclosure starts last year include California, Texas, Florida, Illinois, and Ohio. Foreclosures hit a peak at the height of the housing crisis in 2009 and 2010. Back then, almost 2-and-a-quarter percent of all homes went into foreclosure.
     
    Renting Now Cheaper than Owning in Most Areas
     
    Research from ATTOM Data also shows that renting is now more affordable than owning in 95% of the places where most people live. That’s a complete reversal from last year when it was more affordable to own your own home in 6

    • 6 min
    High & Dry Without Water in Rio Verde, Arizona

    High & Dry Without Water in Rio Verde, Arizona

    It’s a worst-case scenario for homeowners in a suburb of Scottsdale, Arizona. Due to drought conditions in the Southwest, the water supply for Rio Verde Foothills has been shut off. Residents have been left scrambling for water. They have filed a lawsuit, but the bigger question is whether the building boom can continue in Arizona. Land has been inexpensive in Arizona but without enough water, is land really that cheap?
     
    Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.
     
    Scottsdale supplied Rio Verde Foothills with water for decades, since it sprouted into existence in the 1970’s. It’s an unincorporated part of Maricopa county with about 600 homes and about 1,000 residents. The water was trucked in, but with a decades-long drought and a shrinking supply of water from the Colorado River, Scottsdale says it needs to conserve water for its own residents and can no longer deliver water to Rio Verde. 
     
    It’s not just a wake-up call for the residents of Rio Verde, but for residents across Arizona and the western part of the U.S. where drought conditions are ongoing. In a Time article on the water crisis, the author poses the question: “In an era where climate change is shrinking the water supply, should the desert state (of Arizona) keep building homes that depend on water from elsewhere?”
     
    It’s a question with significant repercussions at a time when the state is enthusiastically welcoming new residents and encouraging growth. Arizona’s population has skyrocketed over the last 50 years and is currently at about 7.35 million residents. Census Bureau data shows that Arizona’s population surged 1.3% from July 2021 to July of last year. That represents more than 94,000 people coming into the state and puts Arizona in fifth place for U.S. population growth. The only states with more growth were Georgia, North Carolina, Florida and Texas. (2)
     
    Census Data also shows that Maricopa county, where Phoenix, Scottsdale and Rio Verde are all located, is the eighth fastest growing county in the country. Time also reports that it isn’t just more and more people but water thirsty companies, like data centers, which are expanding into the area and impacting the precious water supply. 
     
    Some say that the water supply can no longer support the growth boom, and that’s a concept that developers and builders are wrestling with. Arizona’s governor, Katie Hobbs released a report that shows a huge water deficit in an area west of Phoenix in the White Tank Mountains where developers want to build. According to Time, these are homes that would house about 800,000 people. But Arizona is now reporting to the local media that developers will have to find their own water supplies or some other solution, before they can build.
     
    Since the state’s supply of water from the Colorado River is already spoken for, they won’t be getting it from there. If they can’t get enough from the ground, they may have to truck it in, which didn’t work very well for the residents in Rio Verde. Other ideas have included a pipeline from some distant water saturated area, or from a desalination plant that’s yet to be built in Mexico’s Sea of Cortez.
     
    With drought and climate change issues intensifying, these kinds of ideas are coming to the forefront. Developers see the water pipeline idea as a way to create a stable source of water that will sustain growth for years to come. And maybe that’s what the Southwest real estate industry needs. But Time reports there’s also the unmentionable idea that growth cannot continue as it has been, and the pipeline/desalinization idea is  the only inevitable solution. It comes with several drawbacks however.
     
    First, the process involves wastewater that would probably be dumped back into the Sea of Cortez and potentially harm sea life. The pipeline would also cut through Organ Pipe National Mon

    • 7 min
    The Real Estate News Brief: Big Mortgage Rate Drop, Office Space Opportunities, What's up with “Barkitecture”?

    The Real Estate News Brief: Big Mortgage Rate Drop, Office Space Opportunities, What's up with “Barkitecture”?

    In this Real Estate News Brief for the week ending January 21st, 2023... why mortgage rates are looking more attractive, the new office space investing opportunity, and a new home design trend called “Barkitecture” that makes pets a priority. 
     
    Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.
     
    Economic News
     
    We begin with economic news from this past week and more evidence that prices are coming back down to earth. The government reports that wholesale prices were .5% lower in December. It was the biggest drop in the Producer Price Index since April of 2020 when the economy shut down because of Covid. The monthly decline brings the annual rate of wholesale price inflation down from 7.2% to 6.2%. (1)
     
    The Federal Reserve will be analyzing the latest reports on inflation ahead of a rate hike decision on February 1st. The Federal Funds rate is currently within the range of 4.25 and 4.50%. Now that inflation is receding, several Fed officials have spoken out, saying they are still determined to “stay the course” but are considering a smaller quarter-point rate hike. They will also have access to the latest report on the Personal Consumption Expenditure index, or PCE, right before that meeting, which could help sway their opinion. The PCE is their preferred inflation gauge because it goes beyond household expenses and accounts for changes in consumer behavior as prices rise. (2)
     
    Although several big tech companies are announcing layoffs, jobless claims remain low. The Labor Department reports just 190,000 initial applications for unemployment last week. That’s down from 205,000 the week before. (3) It indicates that the job market is still strong, but then newly announced layoffs won’t be reflected in the unemployment numbers just yet. Among the companies announcing a substantial number of layoffs  are Google parent Alphabet, Amazon, Carvana, Coinbase, Lyft, Facebook parent Meta, Microsoft, Robinhood, Salesforce, Snapchat parent Snap, payment processor Stripe, Twitter and Wayfair. (4)
     
    In the latest housing market news, housing starts were a mixed bag for residential construction. The Commerce Department reports that, overall, housing starts fell a seasonally adjusted 1.4% to 1.38 million. That includes an 18.9% decline in multi-family starts and an 11.3% increase in single-family starts. The Northeast has the biggest surge in single-family starts at 96.9%! When it comes to permits, they were down 6.5% for single-family homes and up 7.1% for multi-families. (5)
     
    Builders are feeling more confident about the housing market. The National Association of Home Builders says the monthly builder confidence index was up four points in January to 35. That’s far lower than it was a year ago, at 83, but the NAHB says that builders are seeing a “light at the end of the tunnel” as mortgage rates recede and demand increases. NAHB chairman, Jerry Konter says: “The rise in builder sentiment means that cycle lows for permits and starts are likely near, and a rebound for home building could be underway later in 2023.” (6)
     
    Existing home sales continue on a downward trend. The National Association of Realtors reports a 1.5% drop to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.02 million homes in December. It’s the 11th month of declining sales and the lowest level of sales activity since November of 2010. Year-over-year, existing home sales are down 34%. High home prices and mortgage rates have scared a lot of buyers away, but there’s also a huge lack of inventory, in part, because potential buyers are postponing their plans to sell. (7)
     
     Mortgage Rates
     
    Mortgage rates are declining and getting closer to the 6% level. In the last week, Freddie Mac says the average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage was down 18 basis points to 6.15%. The 15-year was down 24 points to 5.28%. Freddie says: “Declining rates are p

    • 6 min
    Contract Cancellations & the Housing Market Reset

    Contract Cancellations & the Housing Market Reset

    The Fed’s relentless effort to stomp out inflation is having a huge impact on one of the nation’s biggest builders. KB Homes reported a homebuyer cancellation rate of 68% in December. And the “housing market reset” isn’t over yet. Although the latest inflation reports show that inflation is subsiding, the cost of a home is still too high for many buyers.
     
    Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.
     
    Inflation is Slowly Decreasing
     
    A report on the Consumer Price Index shows a decline of .1% in December with an annual rate of 6.5%. (1) It’s the lowest rate of inflation we’ve seen in more than a year, and a big drop from a peak of 9.1% last summer. Lower oil prices accounted for most of the latest decline.
     
    When you remove prices for fuel and food, the monthly core rate of inflation was .3% with an annual rate of 5.7%. According to MarketWatch, there were few negatives in the CPI report, although the cost of housing is still rising. The report shows the annual cost of shelter at a 40-year high of 7.5%. And those high prices are scaring a lot of potential buyers.
     
    Surge in Contract Cancellation Rates
     
    For KB Home, the Q4 cancellation rate of 68% was almost double what it was in the third quarter. And much more than that compared to a year earlier when it was just 13%.
     
    The last time the cancellation rate was anywhere near that level was at the beginning of the pandemic, but even then it was around 40%. A Fortune article says that, historically, the cancellation rate for builders has only gone as high as 47%. (2)
     
    The data varies from builder to builder and metro to metro. According to John Burns Real Estate Consulting, the Southwest and Texas experienced high cancellation rates of 45% and 39% respectively. Zonda’s chief economist Ali Wolf tweeted recently that the cancellation rate in Phoenix hit 70%.
     
    Based on data from John Burns, the nationwide contract cancellation rate was 25.6% in October. That’s up from 7.9% in October of last year. 
     
    “Conditions Remain Challenging”
     
    KB Home said in a statement: “Current conditions remain challenging. High mortgage rates and persistent inflation, together with an uncertain economy, have made homebuyers more cautious since the middle of last year.” That’s putting affordability out of reach for many people. Others may be hoping that home prices will go lower in the months to come. 
     
    For many buyers, it’s not a choice to cancel. They may have signed a contract and paid their deposit before the home was built, and then with construction delays, and a steady increase in mortgage rates, are finding out they no longer qualify for a loan. 
    Unfortunately, for some, that means the loss of an earnest money deposit, although a survey of 100 builders by John Burns indicates that most builders will return that deposit.
     
    For buyers who don’t get their money back, there’s not much they can do about it. Florida attorney Craig Rothburd says: “Everything in these agreements is drafted in favor of the developer.” That includes a warning that they could lose their deposit if they back out.
     
    Housing Market “Reset” Continues
     
    The situation has left home builders with a lot of inventory, and a lot of strategizing to reduce that inventory. Many are helping buyers by offering mortgage rate buydowns instead of price cuts. KB Home says it is very cautious about price cuts because it doesn’t want to spook buyers who are already under contract. If they think there’s a cheaper option, it could lead to more cancellations. 
     
    The Federal Reserve sees the current housing market situation as a “reset” to bring demand in line with supply, along with lower home prices. Higher mortgage rates typically push home prices lower, which has started to happen, but home prices are still too high for many homebuyers. And lower-priced

    • 6 min
    The Real Estate News Brief: Inflation Dips, Midwest Attracts Attention, New Baby Boom?

    The Real Estate News Brief: Inflation Dips, Midwest Attracts Attention, New Baby Boom?

    In this Real Estate News Brief for the week ending January 14th, 2023… the good news about inflation, a few new potentially hot real estate markets, and the recent surge in U.S. population growth.
     
    Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.
     
    Economic News
     
    We begin with economic news from this past week, and good news about inflation. For the first time since the beginning of the pandemic, consumer prices were down. The Labor Department reports that the Consumer Price Index fell .1% in December. The decline brings the annual rate of inflation down from 7.1% to 6.5%. It was up as high as 9.1% last summer. The core rate of inflation is considered a more accurate gauge of inflation because it eliminates food and gas prices which can be volatile. That rate was down .3% to a core rate of 5.7%. (1)
     
    The December reading is proof that inflation is subsiding, and is giving economists hope that the Federal Reserve will back off on the rate hike gas pedal. Senior economist Dean Baker at the Center for Economic and Policy Research says: “It’s time for the Fed to declare victory and stop the rate hikes!”
     
    But in general, economists don’t think that will happen. Instead, they are predicting the Fed will go easy on the rate hikes with a quarter point hike at their meeting on February 1st, and possibly another quarter point hike in March. That would bring the Federal Funds rate to a range of 4.75% to 5%. What happens next might be too far off to predict, but economists at the CME Group are forecasting a pause followed by a half point rate cut later this year. (2)
     
    The job market continues to show strength. New claims for unemployment benefits were down last week to 205,000. That’s a 1,000 claim drop from the week before. Wall Street economists had expected a 10,000 claim increase. There were also 63,000 fewer continuing claims for a total of 1.63 million people collecting unemployment benefits. (3)
     
    Consumers are feeling much more confident about the economy. The University of Michigan’s consumer sentiment index jumped from 59.7 to 64.6 in December. That’s still far from a peak of 88.3 in April of 2021, but it’s a big improvement over recent levels. (4)
     
    Mortgage Rates
     
    Mortgage rates swung lower last week. Freddie Mac says the average 30-year fixed rate mortgage was down 15 basis points to 6.33%. The 15-year was down 21 points to 5.52%. (5) And they could be heading lower. Economist Nadia Evangelou of the National Association of Realtors believes the 30-year will dip below 6% in the near future, and will likely stabilize in the 5% range for the rest of the year. (6)
     
    In other news making headlines…
     
    Rent Growth Is Slowing Down
     
    Renters are expected to gain some bargaining power in 2023 as rent growth slows, and the vacancy rate rises. According to ApartmentList, the national median rent growth was 3.8% last year, and it’s  expected to slow further this year. The report shows that 90 of the nation’s 100 largest cities saw an end-of-the-year decline for apartment rents with a vacancy rate of 5.9%. (7)
     
    But not all markets are created equal. The Sun Belt markets have experienced phenomenal growth over the past few years. According to some analysts, they may have hit a growth peak, with cities like Tampa and Tucson gaining almost 40% in rent growth. Although demand is still driving those markets, Apartment List expects more affordable cities in the Midwest to attract attention this year. It says that during the last six months, the top three cities for growth were the Midwestern cities of Indianapolis, St. Louis, and Oklahoma City.
     
    North Texas Popularity
     
    Universal Studios is also recognizing North Texas as a strong growth market, with the announcement of a new theme park. It plans on building a 97-acre theme park in Frisco, Texas, where the population has almost doubled

    • 6 min

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