300 episodes

Research in Action is a weekly podcast about topics and issues related to research in higher education from experts across a range of disciplines.

Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more Dr. Katie Linder, Director of the Oregon State University Ecampus Research Unit

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Research in Action is a weekly podcast about topics and issues related to research in higher education from experts across a range of disciplines.

    [From the Archives] Ep 141: Dr. Gail Crimmins on Arts-informed Research

    [From the Archives] Ep 141: Dr. Gail Crimmins on Arts-informed Research

    On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Gail Crimmins, who initially trained as a performer and worked as a performer, director and casting director in theatre, television and film in the UK for almost 10 years.  She subsequently taught Drama and Performance at universities and conservatoires before moving to Australia in 2008. Gail undertook her PhD study (an arts-informed narrative inquiry into the lived experience of women casual academics) alongside part-time teaching and fully committed mothering. She currently works as a Lecturer of Communication, coordinates a series of Communication Programs, and is the First Year Experience Lead for the School of Communication and Creative Industries, at the University of the Sunshine Coast in Queensland, Australia.  She undertakes arts-informed, narrative and auto-ethnographic research, predominantly though not exclusively, exploring the lived experience of women academics. Gail is a feminist researcher who seeks to illuminate the impacts of patriarchal structures on women’s lives and explore ways for women’s stories and voices to be heard.
    Segment 1: Arts-informed Research [00:00-16:38]
    In this first segment, Gail shares about how she got started with arts-informed research.
    In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:
    Cahnmann, M. (2006). Reading, living, and writing bilingual poetry as scholARTistry in the language arts classroom. Language Arts, 83(4), 342. Cole, A. L., & Knowles, G. J. (2008). Arts-informed research. In G. J. Knowles & A. L. Cole (Eds.) Handbook of the Arts in Qualitative Research. Perspectives methodologies, examples and issues (pp. 55-70). Los Angeles: Sage Publications. Nielsen, L. (2000). Academy performances, academy rewards. Teacher Education Quarterly, 27(2), 163-170. Nielsen, L. (2002). Learning from the liminal: Fiction as knowledge. Alberta Journal of Education Research 48(3), 206-214. Sikes, P. & Gale, K. (2006). Narrative Approaches to Education Research. Plymouth: University of Plymouth. Segment 2: Examples of Arts-informed Research [16:39-37:37]
    In segment two, Gail offers examples of her own work with arts-informed research.
    In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:
    Books: Cole, A. L., & Knowles, G. J. (2008). Arts-informed research. In G. J. Knowles & A. L. Cole (Eds.) Handbook of the Arts in Qualitative Research. Perspectives methodologies, examples and issues (pp. 55-70). Los Angeles: Sage Publications. Gee, J. P. (1990). Social linguistics and literacies (1st ed.). London, UK: Falmer Press. Gee, J. P. (2005). An introduction to discourse analysis theory and method (2nd ed.). London: Routledge.  Articles: Ewing, R., & Hughes, J. (2008). Arts-informed inquiry in teacher education: contesting the myths. European Education Research Journal, 7(4), 512–522. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.2304/eerj.2008.7.4.512 Gee, J. P. (1985). The narrativization of experience in the oral style. Journal of Education, 167(1): 9-35. Gee, J. P. (1991). A linguistic approach to narrative. Journal of Narrative and Life History 1(1):15-39. MacLure, M. (2013). The wonder of data. Cultural Studies ↔ Critical Methodologies, 13(4), 228–232. Ringrose, J. & Renold, E. (2014). ‘F**K Rape!’: Exploring affective intensities in a feminist research assemblage. Qualitative Inquiry 20 (6): 772–780. Sikes, P. & Gale, K. (2006). Narrative Approaches to Education Research. Plymouth: University of Plymouth. Resources authored by Dr. Gail Crimmins: Crimmins, G. (2018). Theatricalising narrative research on women casual academics. Palgrave studies in gender and education. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Crimmins, G. (2017). An emotional, physical and humanistic response to performed data. TEXT Special Issue, 38, 1-13. Retrieved from                                          

    • 38 min
    [From the Archives] Ep 105: Dr. Kris Shaffer on Computational Musicology

    [From the Archives] Ep 105: Dr. Kris Shaffer on Computational Musicology

    On this episode, Katie is joined by Kris Shaffer, Ph.D., a data scientist with a background in computational musicology. Kris currently works as an Instructional Technology Specialist and Adjunct Instructor of Computer Science at the University of Mary Washington. He also does freelance work in web and social-media intelligence, and serves as a volunteer researcher for Data for Democracy. He is a Contributing Editor and Board member for Hybrid Pedagogy and the lead author and editor of Open Music Theory: an open-source, interactive textbook for undergraduate music theory courses.
    You can find him on the web at pushpullfork.com and github.com/kshaffer.
    Would you like to incorporate this episode of “Research in Action” into your course? Download the Episode 105 Instructor Guide (.pdf) or visit our Podcast Instructor Guides page to find additional information.
    Segment 1: Computational Musicology [00:00-10:42]
    In this first segment, Kris discusses his background in computational musicology.
    In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:
    Hybrid Pedagogy Open Music Theory Composer György Ligeti Million Song Dataset Segment 2: Open-source Software Development [10:43-20:50]
    In segment two, Kris shares about his motivations for creating open-source software.
    In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:
    Shaffer, K. (2013, May 23). Open-source scholarship. Retrieved from https://hybridpedagogy.org/open-source-scholarship/ Mozilla Android Find Dr. Shaffer on GitHub: github.com/kshaffer Domain of One’s Own and the University of Mary Washington For more on the Domain of One’s Own, check out RIA # 99: Dr. Jesse Stommel on Founding a Journal  Data for Democracy GitHub Segment 3: New Research Directions [20:51-33:30]
    In segment three, Kris shares about his most recent work on hate speech.
    In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:
    Data for Democracy Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-4:41]: The Relationship Between Mathematics and Music
    To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast:
    Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast
    Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu
    Voicemail: 541-737-1111
    If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.
    The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

    • 33 min
    [From the Archives] Ep 77: Dr. Valerie Clayman Pye on Practice-as-Research

    [From the Archives] Ep 77: Dr. Valerie Clayman Pye on Practice-as-Research

    On this episode, Katie is joined by Valerie Clayman Pye, an Assistant Professor of Theatre in the School of Performing Arts at LIU Post, where she teaches acting and voice and speech. She holds a PhD in Performance Practice, Drama and an MFA in Staging Shakespeare from the University of Exeter, where she worked with Shakespeare’s Globe and the Royal Shakespeare Company. Valerie’s research focuses on actor training pedagogy, facilitating performances of heightened text, and on practice-as-research (PaR). She writes about the intersection between text and performance and on the dynamics of performance at Shakespeare’s Globe. Her article, “Shakespeare’s Globe: theatre architecture and the performance of authenticity” was recently named one of the most-read articles in the journal Shakespeare in the last three years. She also holds an MFA in Acting from Brooklyn College. Valerie is a professional actor and director whose work has reached audiences in over twenty countries. As a voice and speech coach, Valerie has worked in theatre, film, and television coaching Academy, BAFTA, Emmy, and Golden Globe Award nominees. Her book, Unearthing Shakespeare: Embodied Performance and the Globe, was released by Routledge in January 2017.
    Show Notes Would you like to incorporate this episode of “Research in Action” into your course? Download the Episode 77 Instructor Guide (.pdf) or visit our Podcast Instructor Guides page to find additional information.
    Segment 1: Practice-as-Research [00:00-16:40]
    In this first segment, Valerie describes the methodology practice-as-research.
    In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:
    Pye, V. C. (2014). Shakespeare’s Globe: Theatre architecture and the performance of authenticity. Shakespeare, 10(4), 411-427. Pye, V. C. (2017). Unearthing Shakespeare: Embodied performance and the globe. New York: Routledge. Konstantin Stanislavski
    Segment 2: Engaging in Rigorous Practice-as-Research [16:41-34:13]
    In segment two, Valerie shares how researchers using practice-as-research ensure rigor.
    In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:
    Studies in Theatre and Performance Theatre Topics Theatre Survey Performance Research For more on journaling, listeners may want to refer back to these resources: RIA # 10: Dr. Dannelle Stevens on Journaling Best Practices Stevens, D. D., & Cooper, J. E. (2009). Journal Keeping: How to Use Reflective Writing for Learning, Teaching, Professional Insight and Positive Change. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing Nelson, R.(2006). Practice as research and the problem of knowledge. Performance Research 11(4), 105-116. Nelson, R. (and Ed.). (2013). Practice as research in the arts: Principles, protocols, pedagogies, resistances. Hampshire, UK: Palgrave Macmillan Freeman, J. (2010). Blood, sweat & theory: Research through practice in performance. UK: Libri Publishing. Practice as Research in Performance (PARIP) Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-3:39]: An Example of Practice-as-Research
    Bonus Clip #2 [00:00-02:29]: Valerie Defines the World Reflexive for Her Research
    To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast:
    Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast
    Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu
    Voicemail: 541-737-1111
    If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.
    The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.

    • 34 min
    Ep 185: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dr. Kathleen Preston on Item Response Theory

    Ep 185: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dr. Kathleen Preston on Item Response Theory

    On this episode, Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto is joined by Dr. Kathleen Preston, an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at California State University, Fullerton. Dr. Preston teaches several statistics courses including introductory, advanced, and multivariate statistics, as well as psychometrics, and structural equation modeling. She earned her Ph.D. in 2011 in quantitative psychology from UCLA. Her research interests are in using Item Response Theory, specifically the nominal response model, to develop and refine psychological measurement tools. Dr. Preston is co-director of the Fullerton Longitudinal Study where she applies advanced statistical techniques to long-term longitudinal data. Dr. Preston is considered an expert in statistical analysis using R programming and she has recently published a textbook on analyzing multivariate statistics using R. She has given numerous invited statistical presentations and workshops at national and regional conferences, universities, and federal government agencies.
    Segment 1: Psychometrics and Item Response Theory [00:00-20:11]
    In this first segment, Kathleen discusses psychometrics, and how she got interested in quantitative psychology; she explains item response theory and the nominal response model and their applications.
    In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:
    Item Response Theory Nominal Response Model Segment 2: Analysis of the Fullerton Longitudinal Study [20:12 -37:44]
    In segment two, Kathleen discusses the Fullerton Longitudinal Study, the benefits and drawbacks of the study and the statistical methods she employs in her research.
    In this segment the following resources are mentioned:
    Fullerton Longitudinal Study Some of Kathleen's publications on the nominal response model and the Fullerton Longitudinal Study: Preston, K., Parral, S., Gottfried, A.W, Oliver, P., Gottfried, A. E., Ibrahim, S. & Delany, D. (2015). Applying the Nominal Response Model Within a Longitudinal Framework to Construct the Positive Family Relationships Scale. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 75, 901-930. Preston, K. S. J., Gottfried, A. W., Park, J. J., Manapat, P. D., Gottfried, A. E., & Oliver, P. H. (2018). Simultaneous Linking of Cross-Informant and Longitudinal Data Involving Positive Family Relationships. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 78(3), 409–429. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast:
    Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast
    Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu
    Voicemail: 541-737-1111
    If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.
    The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

    • 37 min
    Ep 184 Dr. David Connor on Disability Studies

    Ep 184 Dr. David Connor on Disability Studies

    On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. David J. Connor, a Professor Emeritus of Hunter College (Learning Disabilities Program) and the Graduate Center (Urban Education Program) of the City University of New York. He has taught in New York City for over thirty years, from high schoolers to doctoral students. Throughout his career, David has always been interested in issues of equality, particularly dis/ability and race. He is the author or editor of over a hundred articles and book chapters and nine books, most recent among them being DisCrit: Disability Studies and Critical Race Theory (2016) co-edited with Subini Annamma and Beth Ferri, Contemplating Dis/Ability in Schools and Society: A Life in Education (2018) and the second edition of Rethinking Disability: A Disability Studies Approach to Inclusive Practices (2019) co-authored with Jan Valle. He is currently working on two co-edited books. The first, with Beth Ferri, How Teaching Shapes our Thinking About Dis/abilities: Stories from The Field, consists of autoethnographic accounts about how initial teaching experiences influenced the research agendas of career-long educators. The second, with Subini Annamma and Beth Ferri, DisCrit Expanded: Inquiries, Reverberations & Ruptures, looks at new and innovative ways the theoretical framework of Disability Critical Race Theory is being used within the field of education.
    Segment 1:  Engaging in Disability Studies [00:00-14:27]
    In this first segment, David discusses his work in Dis/Ability Studies, including research projects, strategies, and theories used.
    In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:
    David’s book, DisCrit--Disability Studies and Critical Race Theory in Education David’s book, Rethinking Disability: A Disability Studies Approach to Inclusive Practices Segment 2: Contemplating Dis/Ability
    In segment two, David discusses his book, Contemplating Dis/Ability in Schools and Society: A Life in Education.
    In this segment the following resources are mentioned:
    David’s book, Contemplating Dis/Ability in Schools and Society: A Life in Education RIA #79: Anne-Marie Dietering on Autoethnography Segment 3: Special Education and Disability Studies [26:02-34:30]
    In segment three, David provides his thoughts about Special Education as a field, including how Special Education relates to Dis/Ability Studies.
    To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast:
    Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast
    Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu
    Voicemail: 541-737-1111
    If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.
    The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

    • 34 min
    Ep 183: Dr. Ron Mize on Researching Immigrant Labor

    Ep 183: Dr. Ron Mize on Researching Immigrant Labor

    On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Ron Mize, an Associate Professor in the School of Language, Culture, and Society.  He previously taught International Relations, Sociology, Latino Studies, and Ethnic Studies at ITAM (Mexico City), Humboldt State University, Cornell University, University of Saint Francis-Fort Wayne, California State University-San Marcos, University of California San Diego, Southwestern College, Colorado State University and University of Wisconsin Rock County.  His scholarly research focuses on the historical origins of racial, class, and gender oppression in the lives of Mexicano/as residing in the United States. He is the author of over 50 scholarly publications, including four books.
    Segment 1: Researching Immigrant Labor [00:00-19:21]
    Segment 2: Researching Politicized or Controversial Topics [19:22-35:53]
    To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:
    Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast
    Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu
    Voicemail: 541-737-1111
    If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.
    The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

    • 35 min

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