29 episodes

On Tech Policy Grind we talk about the most pressing issues at the intersection of law and technology. We interview friends and fellows of the Internet Law and Policy Foundry about their interests in the tech policy world. From artificial intelligence and algorithmic justice, to cybersecurity, digital civil liberties and more - join us twice a month as we hammer out the latest in tech law and policy, right here!

The Internet Law and Policy Foundry - www.ilpfoundry.us

Tech Policy Grind The Internet Law & Policy Foundry

    • Technology

On Tech Policy Grind we talk about the most pressing issues at the intersection of law and technology. We interview friends and fellows of the Internet Law and Policy Foundry about their interests in the tech policy world. From artificial intelligence and algorithmic justice, to cybersecurity, digital civil liberties and more - join us twice a month as we hammer out the latest in tech law and policy, right here!

The Internet Law and Policy Foundry - www.ilpfoundry.us

    We Ask the Question “Should We Tax Our Robot Overlords?” with Nikolas Guggenberger

    We Ask the Question “Should We Tax Our Robot Overlords?” with Nikolas Guggenberger

    Hey there listeners, today we prepare for our inevitable robot overlords, and ask the question – if we can’t fight em’ should we tax tem instead? And really, what do we mean by tax? And for that matter – what do we mean by “robot”?



    This is Tech Policy Grind, a podcast from the Internet Law and Policy Foundry. I’m your host, Emory Roane, and today I talked to Nikolas Guggeneberger of the Yale Information Society Project about one proposal to deal with the apparently rapidly approaching wave of automation: taxing businesses that shift to a robotic workforce



    Really, the issue is much more subtle than -more so than I realzied, at least – and I’m so glad to have gotten Nikolas on the show to break down exactly how much I didn’t know. We also touch on some other ways technologies and government may be able to mitigate the upcoming robot jobacalypse, and Nikolas offers some sage advice for breaking into the tech-law field, even when that means traveling to the other side of the world.



    I had an awesome time talking with Nikolas today, and I’m pretty sure you wonderful nerds out there will enjoy this, too. If you do (or if you don’t, I suppose) you can let us know on twitter @techpolicygrind. Another big announcement: applications are STILL OPEN for the next class of fellows at the Internet Law and Policy Foundry. I’ve had a few of you folks reach out already, but if you want to get involved with teh foundry, if you’re an early career professional or a student – I hope we see your application! You can apply at ilpfoundry.us/join/ and applications will be open until April 30th. Again, that’s ilpfoundry.us/join/ applications are open until April 30th! Do it! Foundry fellows set the strategy and run the operations of the foundry, and do cool projects like this podcast!



    All right, announcements over, let’s get to the question at hand: should we tax our overlords?

    • 41 min
    Lessons from Blocking the Big 5 and More With Kashmir Hill

    Lessons from Blocking the Big 5 and More With Kashmir Hill

    Hey there listeners, this is Tech Policy Grind, the show where we hammer out the latest in tech law and policy with the folks at the forefront of that space, and today, we have such a treat.
    Let’s be honest, if you’re listening to this show, you’ve almost certainly read her work over on Gizmodo. Her incredible articles on the Pregnancy Panopticon, how your smart home can spy on you, and recently, what its’ like – and whether it’s possible – to ‘block’ the big 5 tech companies from your life – are some of, if not the best pieces of journalism out there on consumer technology privacy issues.
    Our guest is, of course, is Kashmir Hill, senior writer at Gizmodo Media Group’s Special Projects Desk, and a self described canary in the coal mine for bad consumer technology privacy issues. This week we get to talk about lessons she learned from Blocking the Big 5, the state of consumer privacy protections in the US, and her journey from blogging at Above the Law to writing with an investigative team at Gizmodo where she gets to work on fascinating stories for months at a time.
    My name is Emory Roane, this is still a podcast from the Internet Law and Policy Foundry, and we are so glad to bring you along with us. And good news! Applications are currently open for the next class of fellows at the ILPF. Foundry fellows are early career professionals and students who set the strategy and run the operation of the Foundry, and do cool projects like this podcast that you’re listening to right now! I’ve had awesome opportunities and met incredible colleagues through the foundry. Applications are open until April 30th, so go check it out and submit yours at ilpfoundry.us/join. You can follow the show on twitter @techpolicygrind, and you can find me on twitter at @emoryroane.
    So, with the introductions behind us, let’s start the show.

    • 33 min
    Talking IAPP and Podcasting with Angelique Carson – The TPG / Privacy Advisor Crossover Event of the Century!

    Talking IAPP and Podcasting with Angelique Carson – The TPG / Privacy Advisor Crossover Event of the Century!

    Hey, you’re listening to Tech Policy Grind, a podcast from the Internet Law and Policy Foundry. My name is Emory Roane, and today it’s another foray into privacy – or more specifically, the International Association of Privacy Professionals.
    This time, with Angelique Carson – editor of The Privacy Advisor and host of The excellent (and far more popular) Privacy Advisor Podcast over at the IAPP. If you’re not already subscribed to her show you’ll definitely want to check it out – and if you’re joining us from the Privacy Advisor – welcome! On our show we also dive into the legal weedsy, often (but not exclusively) privacy issues at the forefront of tech policy, with a focus on the early career professionals paving the way in the field.
    Today, with Joe Jerome, we talk about the latest trends in privacy; Angelique’s near decade with the IAPP and work on the Privacy Advisor; and trade stories of podcasting ups, downs and protips. If you enjoy this episode as much as we enjoyed making it, let us know on twitter @techpolicygrind and maybe tell a friend!
    And most importantly, if you’re a student interested in, or an early career professional already working in tech policy, and you haven’t applied for the next class of fellows at the Internet Law and Policy Foundry, what are you waiting for? run, don’t walk to your nearest internet device (it’s probably in your hand or nearby) and then immediately go to ilpfoundry.us/join! We’re accepting applications now until April 30th, and we want to see yours! I’ve had an awesome time with the Foundry and have met some amazing colleagues. Highly recommend, 10 out of 10.
    Okay, the preliminaries are out of the way, let’s get right into it, I’ll see you in about 35 minutes, until then enjoy this chat with the Privacy Advisors very own Angelique Carson.

    • 32 min
    Bug Bounty-ing and Associate Corporate Counseling at Github with Fred Jennings

    Bug Bounty-ing and Associate Corporate Counseling at Github with Fred Jennings

    Hey, you’re listening to Tech Policy Grind, a podcast from the Internet Law and Policy Foundry where we hammer out the latest, at the intersection of law and technology.
    My name is Emory Roane, and Today, Joe Jerome joins us as we talk to Fred Jennings, Associate Corporate Counsel at GitHub, about bug bounty programs, the pitfalls businesses need to keep in mind when setting up bug bounty programs of their own, and the challenges and highs of working at one the coolest Microsoft acquisition yet, right? Seriously though, Github is an awesome company and I hope you enjoy this peek into what its like working in house at a tech company that’s managed to grow to more than 30 million active users while still sticking to its open source heart and soul.
    Before we jump into this chat, though, I hope you’re keeping your eye on the Internet Law and Policy Foundry twitter @ilpfoundry and our website at ilpfoundry.us – applications for the 2019 Class of Fellows will go LIVE this Friday, March 15th, and we’ll be accepting applications until late April. Students, early career professionals, folks in the tech, law and policy space – I hope we see your application! I’ve had some incredible opportunities and have met awesome friends and colleagues through the Foundry, so what are you waiting for?
    All right, with all that said, you know the drill – enjoy this chat with Fred Jennings, Associate Corporate Counsel at Github.

    • 30 min
    Debunking CCPA Myths with Mary Stone Ross

    Debunking CCPA Myths with Mary Stone Ross

    Hey there listeners! Sorry about last week – we had some technical issues that are… well, actually they’re not at all sorted out yet. Pour one out for the old editing PC because that poor machine is dead. But! After editing this entire episode with a mousepad and recording this intro from my closet – we have a really special episode for you.
    You’re listening to Tech Policy Grind, the podcast from the Internet Law and Policy Foundry. My name is Emory Roane, and today we’re bringing you a conversation I was lucky to have with Mary Stone Ross, one of the original coauthors of the ballot initiative that became the California Consumer Privacy Act. In this winding conversation, we talk about debunking common CCPA myths, why privacy rights are so essential right now, and what it takes for a CIA analyst to turn privacy advocate!
    I say this about every conversation, I’m sure, but i had a great time talking with Mary Stone Ross, and I hope you will too. I can’t promise we’ll stop talking about the CCPA after this episode, but if you enjoyed last season’s wonky dive into one of the most exciting privacy laws in the country (god I’m such a nerd) – well, stick around!
    Before we head off back to the State of the Net 2019, where we recorded this conversation, I have some exciting news! The Internet Law and Policy Foundry will be accepting applications for our next class of Fellows, starting next week! Stay tuned to the Foundry twitter @ilpfoundry for more information, but expect the application to go live on March 15th, and the final date to submit your application will be April 30th. If you’re a Student or Emerging professional, or have a tech law and policy background, I hope we see your application! The Foundry is a collection of early career professionals trying to pave their way in the tech law and policy world. I’ve met some incredible people, friends and colleagues, and it’s given me some awesome opportunities.
    All right, now back to the wonkiness: Please sit back and enjoy this deep dive into the California Consumer Privacy Act with coauthor Mary Stone Ross, at State of the Net, 2019.

    • 36 min
    Terrorist Content Regulation: Article 13 on Steroids – A Conversation with Daphne Keller at State of the Net 2019

    Terrorist Content Regulation: Article 13 on Steroids – A Conversation with Daphne Keller at State of the Net 2019

    Did you know that a little over a week ago the European Union decided to move forward with their latest proposed updates to the EU Copyright Directive, which includes requirements for websites to affirmatively scan for copyrighted content – it’s been just about universally lambasted as internet-destroyingly awful – but all signs indicate that the EU is barreling ahead with it. Well, we’re not going to talk about *that* today, but something else that’s just around the corner in the EU, and is *EVEN WORSE*. It’s generically called “terrorist content regulation” and it’s Article 13 on steroids, at least according to our guest today. My name is Emory Roane, and you’re listening to Tech Policy Grind, a podcast from the Internet Law and Policy Foundry. This is another conversation recorded at State of the Net 2019 – this time with the Director of Intermediary Liability at The Center for Internet and Society at Stanford, Daphne Keller. @daphnehk
    I had a great time talking with Daphne, and I think you’ll enjoy this dive into some of the biggest NON-PRIVACY issues facing the internet (I swear there’s no privacy talk in this episode at all (or hardly at all))- from the already mentioned terrorist content regulation to the question of whether or not Twitter is – or should be – considered the modern day public square, and what that means for free speech and censorship.
    I’m going to get right into it, but don’t forget to follow us on twitter at @techpolicygrind, as well as the Internet Law and Policy Foundry at @ilpfoundry – we’ll be releasing information soon about applying for the next class of fellows – so all you early career professionals listening, and especially any students out there – stay tuned. Now, I hope you enjoy this conversation with Daphne Keller at State of the Net, 2019.

    • 30 min

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