122 episodes

15 Minute History is a history podcast designed for historians, enthusiasts, and newbies alike. This is a joint project of Hemispheres, the international outreach consortium at the University of Texas at Austin, and Not Even Past, a website with articles on a wide variety of historical issues, produced by the History Department at the University of Texas at Austin.

This podcast series is devoted to short, accessible discussions of important topics in world history, United States history, and Texas history with the award winning faculty and graduate students at the University of Texas at Austin, and distinguished visitors to our campus. They are meant to be a resource for both teachers and students, and can be enjoyed by anyone with an interest in history.

For more information and to hear our complete back catalog of episodes, visit our website!

15 Minute Histor‪y‬ The University of Texas at Austin

    • Society & Culture

15 Minute History is a history podcast designed for historians, enthusiasts, and newbies alike. This is a joint project of Hemispheres, the international outreach consortium at the University of Texas at Austin, and Not Even Past, a website with articles on a wide variety of historical issues, produced by the History Department at the University of Texas at Austin.

This podcast series is devoted to short, accessible discussions of important topics in world history, United States history, and Texas history with the award winning faculty and graduate students at the University of Texas at Austin, and distinguished visitors to our campus. They are meant to be a resource for both teachers and students, and can be enjoyed by anyone with an interest in history.

For more information and to hear our complete back catalog of episodes, visit our website!

    Environmental Justice and Indigenous History

    Environmental Justice and Indigenous History

    In the Spring of 2016, protests concerning the Dakota Access Pipeline dominated national headlines. For many people, it was the first time they'd thought about the relationship between Indigenous peoples and environmental justice. However, what occurred at Standing Rock and the #NoDAPL movement was part of a long history of Indigenous resistance and protest. In today’s episode, Dina Gilio-Whitaker describes the importance of those events and how they are connected to other movements, past and present. Her most recent book, As Long as Grass Grows: The Indigenous Fight for Environmental Justice from Colonization to Standing Rock, Gilio-Whitaker (a citizen of the Colville Confederated Tribes) explores this history through the lens of “Indigenized Environmental Justice” through the " fraught history of treaty violations, struggles for food and water security, and protection of sacred sites while highlighting the important leadership of Indigenous women in this centuries-long struggle.”

    The "Spanish" Influenza Pandemic of 1918-1920

    The "Spanish" Influenza Pandemic of 1918-1920

    In the age of COVID19 and coronavirus, lots of people are talking about the Spanish flu. What was the Spanish flu, and what can it teach us about the current crisis?

    Scientific, Geographic & Historiographic Inventions of Colombia

    Scientific, Geographic & Historiographic Inventions of Colombia

    Today's guest, Lina del Castillo, recently published a book titled Crafting Republic for the World: Scientific, Geographic, and Historiographic Inventions of Colombia, which offers a new understanding of how Gran Colombia--which split from Spain at the beginning of the 19th century, and then further subdivided into Panama, Colombia, Venezuela, and Ecuador--came to deal with its own past, and the role that science, geography, and history came to play alongside politics as the former colonies grew into nationhood.

    • 23 min
    The History of Sexual Orientation Conversion Therapy in the U.S.

    The History of Sexual Orientation Conversion Therapy in the U.S.

    Sexual orientation conversion therapy, the attempt to change one's sexual orientation through psychological or therapeutic practice, has now been banned in 17 American states and the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, three Canadian provinces, one state in Australia and several nations in Latin America, Europe, and Asia. Beyond the merits of sexual orientation conversion therapy as a medical practice, however, lies a social importance of what the practice represents for a segment of American society.

    • 23 min
    The Case for Women's History

    The Case for Women's History

    Today's guests are the editors of the Oxford Handbook of American Women's and Gender History. Ellen Hartigan O'Connor and Lisa Matterson, both professors of history at the University of California, Davis, join us to discuss the field of women's studies, which as they've argued in the introduction to the book, is not an esoteric topic at all, but actually quite critical to our understanding of American history.

    • 24 min
    The Caribbean Roots of Biodiversity Science

    The Caribbean Roots of Biodiversity Science

    Biodiversity has been a key concept in international conservation since the 1980s, yet historians have paid little attention to its origins. Uncovering its roots in tropical fieldwork and the southward expansion of U.S. empire at the turn of the twentieth century, Megan Raby details how ecologists took advantage of growing U.S. landholdings in the circum-Caribbean […]

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