8 episodes

On Matriarch Movement, host Shayla Oulette Stonechild shares stories of Indigenous women, from Canada to Turtle Island and beyond. Through interviews where issues facing Indigenous women are brought to light, and with portraits that challenge the mainstream narrative around Indigenous identity, Matriarch Movement offers up a new category of Indigenous role models, to inspire the next seven generations.

Matriarch Movement The Brand is Female

    • Society & Culture

On Matriarch Movement, host Shayla Oulette Stonechild shares stories of Indigenous women, from Canada to Turtle Island and beyond. Through interviews where issues facing Indigenous women are brought to light, and with portraits that challenge the mainstream narrative around Indigenous identity, Matriarch Movement offers up a new category of Indigenous role models, to inspire the next seven generations.

    Michelle Chubb: the power of vulnerability on social media

    Michelle Chubb: the power of vulnerability on social media

    Michelle Chubb, known by her handle @indigenous_baddie, is a 23-year-old social media star, with almost half a million followers on TikTok where she shares content blending Indigenous regalia, relatable anecdotes, and social justice activism. She is Néhinaw, or Swampy Cree, currently part of Oxford House, a First Nations Cree community in Northern Manitoba. Growing up in the city of Winnipeg, Michelle spent summers with family at Cross Lake reservation, a place where she could learn ancestral traditions. After going through a difficult time when she lost her grandfather, she reconnected with her Indigenous identity through ancestral art forms, including jingle dress dancing, a practice which she shares a lot about with her followers, including making her own dresses and regalia, in additional to traditional beading. Michelle believes in the power of authenticity and vulnerability showing through her social media presence, and she frequently calls out daily incidents of racism, discrimnation and brings awareness for issues facing Indigenous communities in the Prairies, Canada and beyond. She’s attracted attention from mainstream brands, including eyewear brand BonLook which featured her in a campaign recently, and she was featured by Teen Vogue, in addition to being named one of Canada’s ‘Women of Influence’ in the latest cohort. Listen to her conversation with host Shayla Oulette Stonechild where Michelle talks about finding her voice, staying true to her roots and tapping into the infinite potential of authenticity.
    This episode is brought to you by Louve Design, a women-owned and women-led socially and environmentally-responsible fashion brand, with all pieces made and designed in Canada. Shop at louvedesign.com and use code SHAYLASHIPPING for free shipping at checkout!
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    • 27 min
    Cheyenne Leskanic: a different approach to recovery

    Cheyenne Leskanic: a different approach to recovery

    Cheyenne Leskanic is of Mvskoke, Italian & Scottish ancestry and she is the founder of Three Medicines Longhouse & Three Medicines Birth. With a little over a decade of experience as a Yoga teacher, and as many years of recovery from substance addiction behind her, Cheyenne has made it her purpose to live in integrity and to create places of connection for all people. Drawing on her own experience, she is also a drug and alcohol abuse counsellor who has brought wellness programs into schools, halfway houses, rehab centres & studios. She is also focused on honouring her Mvskoke heritage and works to protect tribal sovereignty while also integrating intersectional partnerships with All Our Relations on this land. Finally, she is a mom of four, and a wife. Cheyenne spoke to host Shayla Oulette Stonechild about her experience with addiction, and how her work today is to teach what she wished she was taught. 
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    • 36 min
    Nikki Sanchez: the future is our responsibility

    Nikki Sanchez: the future is our responsibility

    “The history is not your fault, but it is absolutely your responsibility.” In this episode, host Shayla Oulette Stonechild speaks with decolonial educator Nikki Sanchez, a Pipil/Maya and Irish/Scottish academic, who is also an Indigenous media maker and environmental educator.
    Nikki holds a masters degree in Indigenous Governance and has completed her Ph.D. with a research focus on emerging visual media technology as it relates to Indigenous ontology; she has been the David Suzuki Foundation’s “Queen of Green” where her work centered on environmental journalism, social media and digital media creation to provide sustainable solutions for a healthy planet, as well as content creation to bring more racial and gender inclusivity into the environmental movement. Nikki led the 8-part documentary VICELAND series “RISE” focused on global Indigenous resurgence; she is a TEDx speaker; she has been a wilderness guide and environmental educator in the Nuu-chah-nulth territory of Clayoquot Sound for over 10 years; and she is the creator and director of “Decolonize Together” a collective of Indigenous women who offer decolonial and inclusivity workshops and curriculum creation. Nikki is a guest contributor for DavidSuzuki.Org, Loose Lips Magazine, ROAR Magazine and more. 
    Nikki believes that an equitable and just future depends on the courage we show today and in this conversation, she shares her advice for settlers who want to begin decolonization work; she talks about the meaning behind the concept of ‘matriarchy’ and she speaks of her lifelong pursuit to inspire a bright future for the next Indigenous generations.
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    • 32 min
    Tenille Campbell: celebrating Indigenous joy

    Tenille Campbell: celebrating Indigenous joy

    “For too much of my youth I did worry about what my friends thought, I did worry about what boys thought and I did worry about what people I didn’t know thought of me.”
    Host Shayla Oulette Stonechild speaks with Tenille Campbell, a Dene and Métis poet, photographer and advocate for body positivity and for Indigenous rights from English River First Nation in Saskatchewan, Canada. Her acclaimed poetry collection, #IndianLovesPoems (Signature Editions), was shortlisted for the Indigenous Voices Award. Campbell is the force behind sweetmoon photography, which specializes in capturing Indigenous joy in its many forms. She is also the co-creator and a blogger at tea&bannock, an online collective for Indigenous women photographers and artists to share their stories. Tenille completed her MFA in creative writing at the University of British Columbia and is working on a doctoral degree in Indigenous Literature at the University of Saskatchewan. She just released her second book titled nedi nezu (which means good medicine) with Arsenal Editions; it’s a celebratory, slyly funny, and bluntly honest take on Indigenous sex and romance. 
    In this conversation, Tenille talks about her journey as a writing student and poet (often the only Indigenous in the room), she shares the lessons she’s learned along the way including the ones she hopes to impart on her daughter, and she addresses how her work contributes to decolonization.
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    • 32 min
    Megan Tipler: teaching Indigenous excellence

    Megan Tipler: teaching Indigenous excellence

    Host Shayla Oulette Stonechild speaks with Megan Tipler, a Métis, Edmonton-based educator and artist who believes in the power of representation, and of teaching Indigenous success. Last summer, when her classes moved online due to COVID-19, she came up with an idea to profile some of the people who inspire her most. Megan completed 30 illustrations, one for each day of Indigenous History Month, and posted the illustrations online throughout the summer, along with a biography outlining her subject’s respective achievements. “Bringing in much more representative text really pushes kids to consider an experience outside their own.”
    Megan is also a member of the Nîsohkamâkewin Council, an Indigenous-led advisory focused on systemic change in Edmonton’s Police Service. With Indigenous children making up over 50% of the foster care population across Canada and 70% in Alberta; and Indigenous prisoners representing over 30% of incarcerations in the country (that figure being higher too in the Prairies), she believes schools are a microcosm of society where the interconnectedness of systems of oppression cannot be ignored, and she hopes that the voices of Indigenous peoples will be heard to create lasting change.
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    • 39 min
    Jordan Marie Daniel: running for justice and visibility

    Jordan Marie Daniel: running for justice and visibility

    “It’s because Indigenous people are constantly fighting our own erasure. The stereotypes that exist out there portray a certain image or behaviour about us that was chosen for us and not by us. Representation matters so much whether it’s from storytelling, through filmmaking — that way we don’t have harmful stories, narrative, perpetual violence cycles or harmful insensitive language being perpetuated about us in the film world. We don’t need another story like Pocahontas.”
    Jordan Brings Three White Horses Daniel is Kul Wicasa Lakota, a citizen of the Kul Wicasa Oyate, also known as the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe in South Dakota. As a passionate advocate for her Indigenous relatives and communities, she founded the organization Rising Hearts through which she is fighting for justice and visibility as it intersects across all movements of climate, racial, social, and economic justice. Rising Hearts aims to dismantle white supremacy and racism, rebuild a better future and elevating Indigenous, Black, Brown, Asian, Immigrant, Muslim, Jewish, Two Spirits, LGBTQ+ & non-binary voices and relatives with disabilities. 
    Jordan is also a professional athlete, and as a fourth-generation runner, she has given her running a new purpose: to raise awareness and draw support for the initiatives she believes in -- currently, this includes bringing awareness for the crisis of missing and murdered Indigenous women.
    In this conversation with host Shayla Oulette Stonechild, Jordan speaks about her approach to wellness and connecting with her Indigenous culture and community and she addresses the importance of our relationship to the land, and of Indigenous communities’ roles as guardians of it for the future of mankind, and of our planet.
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    • 40 min

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