300 episodes

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

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    • Science

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

    Brickmaking bacteria and solar cells that turn ‘waste’ heat into electricity

    Brickmaking bacteria and solar cells that turn ‘waste’ heat into electricity

    On this week’s show, Staff Writer Robert F. Service talks with host Sarah Crespi about manipulating microbes to make them produce building materials like bricks—and walls that can take toxins out of the air.

    Sarah also talks with Paul Davids, principal member of the technical staff in applied photonics & microsystems at Sandia National Laboratories, about an innovation in converting waste heat to electricity that uses similar materials to solar cells but depends on quantum tunneling.

    And in a bonus segment, producer Meagan Cantwell talks with Online News Editor David Grimm on stage at the AAAS annual meeting in Seattle. They discuss how wildfires can harm your lungs, crime rates in so-called sanctuary states, and how factors such as your gender and country of origin influence how much trust you put in science.

    This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

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    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 30 min
    NIH’s new diversity hiring program, and the role of memory suppression in resilience to trauma

    NIH’s new diversity hiring program, and the role of memory suppression in resilience to trauma

    On this week’s show, senior correspondent Jeffrey Mervis joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss a new National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant program that aims to encourage diversity at the level of university faculty with the long-range goal of increasing the diversity of NIH grant recipients.

    Sarah also talks with Pierre Gagnepain, a cognitive neuroscientist at INSERM, the French biomedical research agency, about the role of memory suppression in post-traumatic stress disorder. Could people that are better at suppressing memories be more resilient to the aftermath of trauma?

    This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 23 min
    Fighting cancer with CRISPR, and dating ancient rock art with wasp nests

    Fighting cancer with CRISPR, and dating ancient rock art with wasp nests

    On this week’s show, Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about a Science paper that combines two hot areas of research—CRISPR gene editing and immunotherapy for cancer—and tests it in patients.

    Sarah also talks with Damien Finch, a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Earth Sciences at the University of Melbourne, about the Kimberly region of Australia and dating its ice age cave paintings using charcoal from nearby wasp nests.

    This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 24 min
    A cryo–electron microscope accessible to the masses, and tracing the genetics of schizophrenia

    A cryo–electron microscope accessible to the masses, and tracing the genetics of schizophrenia

    Structural biologists rejoiced when cryo–electron microscopy, a technique to generate highly detailed models of biomolecules, emerged. But years after its release, researchers still face long queues to access these machines. Science’s European News Editor Eric Hand walks host Meagan Cantwell through the journey of a group of researchers to create a cheaper, more accessible alternative.

    Also this week, host Joel Goldberg speaks with psychiatrist and researcher Goodman Sibeko, who worked with the Xhosa people of South Africa to help illuminate genetic details of schizophrenia. Though scientists have examined this subject among Western populations, much less is known about the underlying genetics of people native to Africa.

    This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

    Download a transcript (PDF)

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    About the Science Podcast

    • 20 min
    Getting bisphenol A out of food containers, and tracing minute chemical mixtures in the environment

    Getting bisphenol A out of food containers, and tracing minute chemical mixtures in the environment

    As part of a special issue on chemicals for tomorrow’s Earth, we’ve got two green chemistry stories. First, host Sarah Crespi talks with contributing correspondent Warren Cornwell about how a company came up with a replacement for the popular can lining material bisphenol A and then recruited knowledgeable critics to test its safety.

    Sarah is also joined by Beate Escher of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research and the University of Tübingen to discuss ways to trace complex mixtures of humanmade chemicals in the environment. They talk about how new technologies can help detect these mixtures, understand their toxicity, and eventually connect their effects on the environment, wildlife, and people.

    Read more in the special issue on chemicals for tomorrow’s Earth.

    This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

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    • 24 min
    Researchers flouting clinical reporting rules, and linking gut microbes to heart disease and diabetes

    Researchers flouting clinical reporting rules, and linking gut microbes to heart disease and diabetes

    Though a law requiring clinical trial results reporting has been on the books for decades, many researchers have been slow to comply. Now, 2 years after the law was sharpened with higher penalties for noncompliance, investigative correspondent Charles Piller took a look at the results. He talks with host Sarah Crespi about the investigation and a surprising lack of compliance and enforcement.

    Also this week, Sarah talks with Brett Finlay, a microbiologist at the University Of British Columbia, Vancouver, about an Insight in this week’s issue that aims to connect the dots between noncommunicable diseases like heart disease, diabetes, and cancer and the microbes that live in our guts. Could these diseases actually spread through our microbiomes?

    This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

    Download a transcript (PDF).

    [Image: stu_spivack/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

    • 27 min

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