239 episodes

Real-life stories behind the headlines from BBC News. A topical news podcast that brings you compelling human interest stories that will inspire, amuse or give you perspective.

5 Minutes On BBC Podcasts

    • News
    • 4.4 • 7 Ratings

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

Real-life stories behind the headlines from BBC News. A topical news podcast that brings you compelling human interest stories that will inspire, amuse or give you perspective.

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    Exam Results 2022 - what you need to know

    Exam Results 2022 - what you need to know

    It's that time of year again! Exam halls seem like a distant memory and now students up and down the country are opening their exam results. For the first time since the pandemic began pupils are being awarded grades based on their end-of-year tests, after cancellations in 2020 and 2021 meant scores were based on teacher predictions.

    A-Level and GCSE grades are expected to be lower than in the last two years, and exam boards have been criticised for mistakes on some papers. But grade boundaries are more lenient this year. So if you're collecting results, whether it be A-levels, GCSEs, BTecs, or for the first time, T-Levels, what are some of the things you need to consider after you've opened that all important envelope?

    For 5 Minutes On, Summer, Ben, Grace, & Ishaq get answers on further study, transferrable qualifications, and next year's exams - from BBC Education Correspondent Hazel Shearing.

    20 years of 1Xtra: Amplifying black culture

    20 years of 1Xtra: Amplifying black culture

    On the 16th of August 2002, the BBC launched a brand new radio station dedicated to contemporary black music and culture. It was unlike any other station there’d ever been. Radio 1Xtra was born. It was raw, it was real, it was authentic.

    And it went on to help catapult the careers of countless artists, from Stormzy and Ed Sheeran, to Jorja Smith and Little Simz. It’s helped bring genres like Grime, Afrobeat and Drill into mainstream music, and given UK rap a major platform. It’s given its listeners a voice, reflecting their lives and the big cultural issues that matter to them, like BLM.

    This is the story of 20 years of 1Xtra, told by two of its presenters… Remi Burgz and DJ Target.

    Photo credit: Sarah Jeynes/BBC

    Are songs getting shorter?

    Are songs getting shorter?

    TikTok and streaming services have re-defined the music industry and forced artists to find new ways of standing out. As a result, songs appear to be getting shorter with fast hooks and quick choruses.

    The days of huge number ones like Oasis’ All Around The World - clocking in at more than 9 minutes - are long gone, and pop stars now need to make an impact instantly. More and more songs are charting at under three minutes.

    For 5 Minutes On, music journalist Steve Holden discusses the demand for bitesize pop with Carl Smith, editor at the Official Charts.

    Photo credit: Getty Images

    Disappearing pools: 'A health and welfare disaster'

    Disappearing pools: 'A health and welfare disaster'

    Public swimming pools are closing across the UK, leaving many towns without a place that’s safe to swim. They’re not just a place of leisure. They offer a crucial service as a space where children can learn to swim and lifeguards can receive their training. They also provide a safe space for vulnerable people to exercise.

    BBC News has contacted councils across the UK. One in six said that at least one swimming pool in their area has closed since 2019. Energy costs, chlorine shortages and a lack of staff are among the reasons given.

    In our latest episode of our podcast 5 Minutes On, BBC reporter Emily Unia travels to Cornwall to find out what happens when the only pool in town closes - and how some communities are pulling together to ensure their precious facilities stay open.

    Photo credit: Julian Stratenschulte via Getty Images

    How a colourful plastic brick revolutionised play

    How a colourful plastic brick revolutionised play

    Since it was invented, the Lego brick has never really changed.

    Designs may have got more extravagant and the colours may be even brighter, but the simple act of attaching one brick to another remains the same.

    As the Lego Group celebrates its 90th anniversary, we look at its continuing appeal to children and adults around the world - and explore how things have changed for the company over the decades.

    For 5 Minutes On, BBC reporter Steve Holden - a self-confessed Lego fanatic - speaks to the Lego Group's Vice President of Design, Matthew Ashton, about his love of the brick and where Lego will go in the future. He also visits the world's largest Lego store - in London's Leicester Square - to meet some of the toy's biggest fans.

    Photo credit: Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images

    Are black children being over-policed in schools?

    Are black children being over-policed in schools?

    A report says black children are disadvantaged in schools because they're viewed as more adult-like. It highlights the case of Child Q, who was strip searched by police in 2020.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
7 Ratings

7 Ratings

Top Podcasts In News

The New York Times
NPR
Alex Wagner, MSNBC
The Daily Wire
Cumulus Podcast Network | Dan Bongino
Crooked Media

You Might Also Like

BBC World Service
Vox
Apple News
The New York Times
The Wall Street Journal
BBC World Service