138 episodes

Keeping a consistent sound in how you present your company really is the "hidden gem" of marketing. But audio or sonic branding influences us in many different ways and in many different places within our lives. I'll be exploring that here, both with my own observations and by interviewing knowledgeable professionals in the field of advertising, marketing, music and science.

Audio Branding Jodi Krangle

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 71 Ratings

Keeping a consistent sound in how you present your company really is the "hidden gem" of marketing. But audio or sonic branding influences us in many different ways and in many different places within our lives. I'll be exploring that here, both with my own observations and by interviewing knowledgeable professionals in the field of advertising, marketing, music and science.

    Finding the Fix: An Interview with Aaron Matthews - Part 2

    Finding the Fix: An Interview with Aaron Matthews - Part 2

    “It's about doing something that's relevant to that brand that makes people, you know, have intrigue and then go either search for it or find out more information.” -- Aaron Matthews

    This episode's the second half of my interview with audio branding expert and creative director Aaron Matthews as we talk about how Creative Fix goes about crafting the perfect brand sound, the secret to hosting a successful branded podcast, and the surprisingly retro future of audio branding.
    As always, if you have any questions for my guest, you’re welcome to reach out through the links in the show notes. If you have questions for me, just visit http://www.audiobrandingpodcast.com/ (www.audiobrandingpodcast.com) where you’ll find all sorts of ways to get in touch. Plus, subscribing to the newsletter (on the http://www.audiobrandingpodcast.com/ (www.audiobrandingpodcast.com) webpage) will let you know when the new podcasts are available.
    Open to Everybody
    We begin the second half of our interview with a look at Creative Fix’s process for working with clients and guiding them through the creative process, at the role audio mood boards play in the brainstorming process, and how long it might take for all the different elements to come together. The conversation turns to audio branding, and its untapped potential, particularly on a local level “I think brands are at the start of waking up to it. Very few brands do it well, to be honest, but I think it's open to everybody.”

    Bringing Jingles Back
    The topic shifts to both the past and future of audio branding, and to how jingles, the hallmark of audio branding in the '80s and '90s, might make a comeback in the digital age. "I think there's an opportunity," Aaron says, "and I think we can do it in a 2022 way." As he jokes, "I think it's time to bring back the jingle. I'm going to start a campaign." Aaron explains that the key to audio marketing is to do the unexpected: “Let's do less copy in those ads and more sound design, let's do the jingles and the sonic identities and the stuff no one else is doing because that's how you stand out.”

    The Tip of the Iceberg
    As the episode comes to a close, we talk more about branded podcasts and the role they play in company branding and the tricky balance of creating brand recognition without selling a product. "There's a lot of opportunities," Aaron says, "and I think there are a lot more branded podcasts coming, and I think we're just at the very, very tip of the iceberg." We wrap things up with a look at social audio apps like Twitter Spaces and Clubhouse, and the role they might play in the future of audio branding and marketing on social media. As he puts it, "it's the idea that it's meant to be for everyone, and that everyone can jump in and have that conversation and that's the important thing about it."

    Episode Summary
    The process of creating an audio brand from start to finish
    The rise and fall of jingles and how they could make a comeback
    Branded podcasts and how to successfully market without selling
    How social audio is opening the media landscape to everyone

    Connect with the Guest
    Creative Fix Audio: https://creativefixaudio.com/ (https://creativefixaudio.com/)
    Connect with Aaron Matthews on LinkedIn:https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09BGN8Z4S/ ( https://www.linkedin.com/company/creative-fix-audio/)
    Connect with the Audio Branding Podcast:
    Book your project with https://voiceoversandvocals.com/ (Voice Overs and Vocals) https://voiceoversandvocals.com/ (https://voiceoversandvocals.com)
    Tweet with me on https://twitter.com/JodiKrangle (Twitter) - https://twitter.com/JodiKrangle (https://twitter.com/JodiKrangle)
    Watch the Audio Branding Podcast on https://www.youtube.com/c/JodiKrangleVO (YouTube) - https://www.youtube.com/c/JodiKrangleVO (https://www.youtube.com/c/JodiKrangleVO)
    Connect with me on https://www.linkedin.com/in/jodikrangle/ (LinkedIn) - https://www.linkedin.com/in/jodikrangle/...

    • 30 min
    Finding the Fix: An Interview with Aaron Matthews - Part 1

    Finding the Fix: An Interview with Aaron Matthews - Part 1

    “Production companies make these amazing videos and then go ‘oh, we need to think about some music and stuff,’ and it sort of like becomes a bit of a rush. But actually, when you think about it at the same time as pre-production and you start planning out how the sound's going to work with the visuals, it elevates the video so much. And you'll know this if you've ever watched some of the latest prints, like the new James Bond trailer, and if you listen to the actual sound design on that and what's included over the top, it just takes to another level.” -- Aaron Matthews

    This week’s guest is an audio branding expert who’s worked for some of the biggest media brands in the UK, including BBC Radio 1, Global Radio, and Bauer. He’s fine-tuned his understanding of how consumers interact with brands at a content level, and the company that he founded, Creative Fix, develops unique audio advertising content that’s relevant, distinct, and memorable.
    His name is Aaron Matthews, and he has a lot to share with us in this interview about the current state of the advertising industry, especially when it comes to effective audio branding.
    As always, if you have any questions for my guest, you’re welcome to reach out through the links in the show notes. If you have questions for me, just visit http://www.audiobrandingpodcast.com/ (www.audiobrandingpodcast.com) where you’ll find all sorts of ways to get in touch. Plus, subscribing to the newsletter (on the http://www.audiobrandingpodcast.com/ (www.audiobrandingpodcast.com) webpage) will let you know when the new podcasts are available.

    Altering Your Emotions
    Regular listeners know that we usually start the interview off with a look back at my guest's earliest memories of sound, and Aaron shares the '80s music that his parents listened to with him as a child, from INXS to George Michael, and how, as a teenager, a CD of Gustav Holst's The Planets opened his eyes to the power of music. “What an amazing sound,” he describes it, “and you know how emotional that music is and how it moves you, and I remember hearing this as a teenager and thinking ‘wow, I've never heard anything like that before and it's amazing.’” He tells us how he went on to become a DJ, and how that experience taught him the profound connection between music and its listener. “At the simplest form,” he explains, “you're altering someone's emotions through music.”

    Doing Things Digitally
    We talk about the differences between traditional radio advertising and digital audio, and how digital audio’s more personal podcasts have created a new kind of audio market. “Radio,” Aaron tells us, “from its conception, is a shared listening experience... and advertising hasn't really changed in radio because of that." He explains that over eighty percent of digital audio is heard through headphones, and how new audio technology like 3D audio opens up unique branding possibilities. “That presents lots of really interesting opportunities for us,” he says, “in what we can do with sound generally, and we can actually do things with sound that we never could in radio because you'd miss them.”

    Transporting the Listener
    “There's so much more we can do with sound than we can do in radio,” Aaron continues as we talk about digital audio marketing. “You can put people in different places using really great soundscapes.” He tells us how silence is an underused but particularly effective tool in digital audio, and how binaural audio effects have helped transform such diverse soundscapes as ambient horror movie tracks to a recent New Zealand tourism campaign. “Before you even speak one word of copy or the voiceover even starts speaking,” he says, “you've transported someone through their imagination.”

    The Sound of Consistency
    As the first half of our interview concludes, we talk about how corporations use a combination of consistent branding and versatile audio to create an

    • 28 min
    Making Music Fun: An Interview with Nick Morrison - Part 2

    Making Music Fun: An Interview with Nick Morrison - Part 2

    “People don't forget that stuff. They remember people that blow their minds. They won't necessarily remember the music, people won't remember the thing that you did, but they'll remember the way that you made them feel, whether that's by your actions or by the actual emotion that you've imparted to them via your music, or your sound, or whatever it happens to be.” -- Nick Morrison

    This episode's the second half of my interview with bestselling author, professional musician, teacher, session artist, and composer Nick Morrison, as we talk about the process of turning imagery and emotion into sound, the importance of networking and building relationships, and about the most valuable advice he has to offer about navigating a freelance career in the digital age.
    As always, if you have any questions for my guest, you’re welcome to reach out through the links in the show notes. If you have questions for me, just visit http://www.audiobrandingpodcast.com/ (www.audiobrandingpodcast.com) where you’ll find all sorts of ways to get in touch. Plus, subscribing to the newsletter (on the http://www.audiobrandingpodcast.com/ (www.audiobrandingpodcast.com) webpage) will let you know when the new podcasts are available.

    Making it More Purple
    As the second half begins, Nick and I talk about some of his memorable experiences with building an audio brand, including one particularly tricky suggestion. “His last note,” Nick recalls, “and this drove me crazy, was 'can you make it sound more purple?” He reveals the answer to that mysterious request and we discuss a study, linked below, that showed how it’s audio, not video, that plays the biggest role in making or breaking a viewer’s experience. “Once you get better,” he explains as we talk about advances in audio technology, “you can't go back with audio. There's something in the human ear that, if you hear poor quality audio, it immediately turns off your brain and you stop listening.”

    Always Say Yes
    We also look at the role networking and building a positive reputation in the industry can play, and how online resources such as Taxi.com can help. “Places like that can get you a lot further, faster,” he says, “than just trying to put your stuff on one of the numerous websites that are just a repository of the world's garbage. And that sounds harsh, but it's like a needle in a haystack.” He also tells us his approach to forging lasting relationships with clients who are just starting out. “If I have a job offer or an opportunity that comes up, as long as it doesn't hurt me financially or embarrass myself or my family in some way, shape, or form, I will say yes. Say yes to as much as you can.”

    The World at Our Fingertips
    Nick also offers advice on navigating the financial aspects of freelance audio based on his own experiences as a musician, and we talk about his bestselling, and unorthodox, instructional books on playing the guitar. “One of the biggest problems that I find,” he explains, “is that music is taught the same way as it was written down in the late 1700s.” Our interview concludes with Nick’s advice to anyone who’s looking to follow their dreams and make a living online. “We've got the internet and the world at our fingertips. There is no need to box yourself in and say ‘I am only this.’”

    Episode Summary
    The importance of sound in building a mood and creating a positive impression
    Meeting the challenge of online networking and building client relationships
    Financial tips about audio revenue and royalty income
    How Nick’s working to bring music training into the 21st century


    Connect with the Guest
    Nick’s Morrison Media Website: https://morrisonmediagroup.com/ (https://morrisonmediagroup.com/)
    Nick’s Guitar Dojo Website along with a free copy of Nick’s book Essential Chords and Scales for Guitar for new email list subscribers: https://guitardojo.ca/ (https://guitardojo.ca/)
    Follow Nick Morrison on Facebook:...

    • 32 min
    Making Music Fun: An Interview with Nick Morrison - Part 1

    Making Music Fun: An Interview with Nick Morrison - Part 1

    “One of my Berklee professors, one of my favorite things that has stayed with me from my time there, said 'you know, Nick, a bad day playing music is still better than a good day doing just about anything else.'" -- Nick Morrison

    This episode's guest is an Amazon #1 bestselling author and a professional musician, composer, teacher, voice actor, YouTube creator, actor, and a music and media consultant from Calgary Alberta. He's toured throughout the United States, Canada, and Japan as a guitarist, worked as a session musician, and as a writer and composer for Warner Bros, Universal Studios, Sony, MTV, ABC, NBC, HGTV, and HBO, among others. He was educated at the Berklee College of Music in Boston, Massachusetts, where he studied guitar performance and music business management.
    In 2021 he began writing guitar instructional books and continues to bring his love of the instrument to as many people around the world as possible. His name is Nick Morrison, and our discussion runs the gamut from music, to sound design, to audio branding and everything in between.
    As always, if you have any questions for my guest, you’re welcome to reach out through the links in the show notes. If you have questions for me, just visit http://www.audiobrandingpodcast.com/ (www.audiobrandingpodcast.com) where you’ll find all sorts of ways to get in touch. Plus, subscribing to the newsletter (on the http://www.audiobrandingpodcast.com/ (www.audiobrandingpodcast.com) webpage) will let you know when the new podcasts are available.

    Getting into Sound
    We start things off with a look back at Nick’s earliest impressions of sound, and he tells us about his mother’s lifelong love of music and his happy memories of growing up in a musical family. He talks about the surprising influence the original Super Mario Bros. had on his lifelong career and how it inspired him from an early age to devote himself to music. “It was at that point that I really decided,” he tells us, “that I was like ‘I'm going to do something with music.’ I didn't have the vocabulary then to know specifically what I wanted to do, but I knew that I wanted to get into sound.”

    The Cat and the Piano
    “A cat can jump on a piano," Nick jokes as we talk about his early music lessons, from the violin to the piano to his first guitar, "and it'll sound good." He tells us about the unique musical challenges and rewards that each instrument offers and how he's come to embrace his role as a teacher and focuses now on helping people who might be returning to their love of music after a long career elsewhere. "What can I give to those students," he says, describing his approach to teaching new musicians, "that in those fifteen minutes they can get the most out of the time they have with their instrument as possible?"

    Making Music Online
    We also take a look at remote learning, online groups, and how our post-COVID shift to virtual lessons and meetings has changed the musical landscape. "I can't think of a single industry," Nick says, "that doesn't have at least some computer animation or computer modeling or computer monitoring or computer connectivity to keep us in touch and to help us with our jobs." He gives us a few examples, such as how his Guitar Dojo Facebook group works to make learning about music fun for its members and listeners alike. "My mission statement," as he puts it, "is to make music fun again."

    With Music and Sound
    The conversation turns to some of the old computers we grew up with, and how MIDI controllers and digital sampling have transformed the creative process. We talk about some of the television and advertising themes he most admires, and about how licensed compositions compare to life on the musical road. “I'd rather be playing guitar,” he says, “writing music, talking about guitar, teaching guitar, composing music… something to do with music and sound and the thing that I love.”

    Episode Summary
    Nick’s...

    • 37 min
    Musical Alchemy: An Interview with Eric Singer - Part 2

    Musical Alchemy: An Interview with Eric Singer - Part 2

    “One of the wonderful things about music is that it's by and large pretty universal, you know, when almost any culture will perceive a minor chord as something that feels sad. Even my 4-year-old son can identify that as 'oh that's sad.’ But there are more subtleties too, you know, and that may affect instrument choice, it might affect tempo, and it might affect chord progression.” -- Eric Singer

    This episode is part two of my interview with audio producer and creative director Eric Singer as we discuss the advantages of virtual audio presentations, the challenges independent artists face in an increasingly online industry, and some surprising new advances in advertising technology.
    As always, if you have any questions for my guest, you’re welcome to reach out through the links in the show notes. If you have questions for me, just visit http://www.audiobrandingpodcast.com/ (www.audiobrandingpodcast.com) where you’ll find all sorts of ways to get in touch. Plus, subscribing to the newsletter (on the http://www.audiobrandingpodcast.com/ (www.audiobrandingpodcast.com) webpage) will let you know when the new podcasts are available.

    Creating Music and Sound
    We start the second half of the interview with a discussion of how the industry has changed over the past few years, and how virtual conferences and Zoom meetings have all but replaced direct presentations. Eric tells us some of the limitations, as well as a few unexpected advantages, of online audio demonstrations, and how Coupe Studios is rising to the challenge of bringing authenticity to audio branding and marketing. “We discovered along the way,” he says, “that we really, really enjoy applying that authentic creativity, that art form of creating music and sound, to advertising.”

    A Whole New World
    The topic turns to the indie bands that Coupe Studios also supports, and how social media and the new sonic landscape have impacted smaller bands and artists. “It's a whole new world out there,” Eric notes, “but I think the plus side of that is that there's so much content, not just advertising, podcasts, streaming video... there is so much content that needs music. There are infinitely more opportunities to get your music heard.” He also tells us about Coupe’s strategy for localizing jingles for companies all over the world, and how collaboration is the key to a successful sound design. “We try to make it a pretty big party where we get input from anybody who has something valuable to bring to the table.”

    For Your Ears Only
    As the episode comes to a close, we look at the new technologies that might change the advertising industry in the near future. “One thing that I believe we're going to see much more of,” Eric tells us, “in probably the fairly near future, is hyper-targeted, out-of-home advertising,” such as directional sound technology that can send targeted audio messages to a single individual within a crowd, and new ultrasound systems that can expand its reach to cover each and every customer in a store. “Now that the cost is starting to come down,” as he puts it, “advertising is the obvious application.”

    Episode Summary
    How virtual presentations have changed Eric’s approach to audio
    Coupe Studios’ journey from classic rock studio to brand compositions
    The challenge indie artists face in the digital music industry
    Directional sound technology and the future of audio advertising


    Connect with the Guest
    Website: https://coupestudios.com/ (https://coupestudios.com/)
    Connect with Eric Singer on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/eric-singer-audio/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/eric-singer-audio/)
    Connect with the Audio Branding Podcast:
    Book your project with https://voiceoversandvocals.com/ (Voice Overs and Vocals) https://voiceoversandvocals.com/ (https://voiceoversandvocals.com)
    Tweet with me on https://twitter.com/JodiKrangle (Twitter) - https://twitter.com/JodiKrangle...

    • 30 min
    Musical Alchemy: An Interview with Eric Singer - Part 1

    Musical Alchemy: An Interview with Eric Singer - Part 1

    “There are generally two things that I want to focus on when presenting the creative to a client. First, and I think the most important, is the why: what is the justification for why we have done this or why we've included this instrument, why we're including this long breakdown section, why this tempo, whatever it is.” -- Eric Singer

    My guest's first love in this episode was audio, but it took him a while to get back to it. He's been with Coupe Studios for sixteen years, and before that he spent time as a magazine editor, a photographer, and even a semi-pro football player. Now a partner at Coupe, he's focusing specifically on sonic branding and music for advertising and film. His name is Eric Singer, and I'm looking forward to hearing what he has to say about where audio branding is now and where it's heading into the future.
    How does he let their clients know that their audio is important? How does Coupe Studios differentiate itself in a steadily growing audio-forward market? If you’re trying to decide why audio branding is important for your company, this discussion will give you a firsthand look.
    As always, if you have any questions for my guest, you’re welcome to reach out through the links in the show notes. If you have questions for me, just visit http://www.audiobrandingpodcast.com/ (www.audiobrandingpodcast.com) where you’ll find all sorts of ways to get in touch. Plus, subscribing to the newsletter (on the http://www.audiobrandingpodcast.com/ (www.audiobrandingpodcast.com) webpage) will let you know when the new podcasts are available.

    A Multisensory Experience
    We begin the interview with Eric’s account of his earliest memories of sound, a Fischer-Price turntable that he used as a child to play the classic Beatles album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. As he puts it, its unconventional sound design and ambient effects “planted the seed for me in terms of a love of audio.” He goes on to recount his very first experience as a radio DJ during high school. “It was this multisensory experience,” he says, “where you're looking at the album art [and] you're reading the liner notes. The center of it was the music, but I loved talking about it just as much.”

    Digging in Deep
    Eric tells us about how he discovered his affinity for editing and production, and how it led to his role as an audio producer. “We have this extremely talented, dedicated team of composers and sound designers,” he explains, “and my job is to stay out of their way.” We talk about how he works with clients to help them understand and navigate the sometimes overwhelming process of finding just the right creative strategy. “There's no better way, I think, to emphasize the value in what we do than working collaboratively with the client or with the agency and really digging in deep.”

    Flying Below the Radar
    Next, we look at the process of building a sonic brand for a client, whether it's a new company that's starting from scratch or a major brand like McDonald's with an established audio brand. Eric explains that a new brand can offer more room to create a unique sonic identity: as he puts it, "it's nice in the sense that we can often get involved before they've really thought things through." We also talk about how easily audio is overlooked, and how that can sometimes be as much an opportunity as a challenge. "It's a tricky position to be in," he says, "but it's also kind of fun to fly below the radar."

    The Emotional Aspect
    “The second piece of it," Eric says about the two parts of creating a sonic brand, "is the emotional and the subjective aspects of it." We discuss how individual experiences and impressions, everything from cultural nuance to an unpleasant memory, can have a powerful impact. "The idea of something totally subjective killing a really great piece of work can be really scary," he says while telling us how he guides clients in making the right decisions when it comes to...

    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
71 Ratings

71 Ratings

Easycheese114 ,

Great Info and Polished!

Jodi has an amazingly calm and professional voice m, and covers great topics with guests!

Austin from Woo Punch ,

Founder, Woo Punch Creative

As an interviewer, Jodi asked me very interesting questions that led me to unexpected places in our interview. She's worth listening to because she gets the most out of her interview subjects, which makes for a dynamic podcast.

MilleyAalto ,

Binge-Worthy Podcast!

Great Voice with Great Content makes it a delight to binge listen to and learn what you are missing in your advertising repertoire! They truly are hidden gems of marketing! It could be a whole new paradigm for how you strut your brand.

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