78 episodes

Keeping a consistent sound in how you present your company really is the "hidden gem" of marketing. But audio or sonic branding influences us in many different ways and in many different places within our lives. I'll be exploring that here, both with my own observations and by interviewing knowledgeable professionals in the field of advertising, marketing, music and science.

Audio Branding Jodi Krangle

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 33 Ratings

Keeping a consistent sound in how you present your company really is the "hidden gem" of marketing. But audio or sonic branding influences us in many different ways and in many different places within our lives. I'll be exploring that here, both with my own observations and by interviewing knowledgeable professionals in the field of advertising, marketing, music and science.

    Interview with Sonic Branding Strategist & CEO of Pirate Group Inc., Tom Eymundson - Part 1

    Interview with Sonic Branding Strategist & CEO of Pirate Group Inc., Tom Eymundson - Part 1

    Tom Eymundson is a sonic branding strategist and a partner, CEO and driving force behind the ongoing evolution of Pirate Group Inc. In this first part of our discussion, we break down Tom’s three step process for serving his clients and discuss some of the background that led him to create sonic brands for a wide variety of companies. He’s super knowledgeable and I can’t wait for you to hear his perspective on the importance of having a strategic sonic brand. You can find Pirate at www.piratetoronto.com .
    We discuss:
    How he’s currently doing in this COVID world
    The difference between audio branding and sonic branding
    Tom’s definition of sonic branding
    Tom’s background that led to ending up as the head of Pirate Group Inc.
    Earworms and their impact on Tom’s decision to go into sonic branding
    The sonic branding of James Bond
    The change in creating music for audio branding from orchestras to now Tom being the trackmaster
    The “magic” of adding music to a commercial and how it completely changes people’s reactions
    The story of the closing of Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto
    How layering music with storytelling and the visual component leads to an emotional connection
    The evolution into his current process when creating sonic logos
    Breaking down why some sonic identities stick and others don’t
    The need to dig deep and figure out the brand identity before being able to create a new sonic logo
    Sonic logos are meant to draw brand recall
    The goal of creating an emotional reaction to the sonic branding
    The sonic branding methodology should lead to truly understanding the background of the sound
    When to recreate an audio brand or just refresh it
    The process of diving deep into determining the audio branding
    The similarities between creating a visual logo and a sonic logo
    What Tom’s company does if someone says they don’t like what’s been created!
    If you want to find more information about Pirate Group Inc, you can find them:
    On their website: http://www.piratetoronto.com (www.piratetoronto.com)
    On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/piratetoronto (https://www.facebook.com/piratetoronto)
    On Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/pirate_toronto (www.instagram.com/pirate_toronto)
    On LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/pirate-radio-and-television/ (https://www.linkedin.com/company/pirate-radio-and-television/)
    On Twitter: https://twitter.com/piratetoronto (https://twitter.com/piratetoronto)
    This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco (http://www.humbertofranco.com/ (http://www.humbertofranco.com/)).
    Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast? If so, here’s the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 (https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453) And if you like what you hear (and read!) – please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much!
    And if you’re interested in crafting an audio brand for your business, why not check out my FREE download – 5 Tips For Implementing An Intentional Audio Strategy at https://voiceoversandvocals.com/audio-branding-strategy/ (https://voiceoversandvocals.com/audio-branding-strategy/)

    Bringing Fantasy To Life

    Bringing Fantasy To Life

    Have you ever heard the roar of a dinosaur? If you’ve seen any of the Jurassic Park movies, it’s pretty much impossible to forget the bellowing cry of a Tyrannosaurus rex, but did dinosaurs actually sound like that? No one’s really sure. The two closest living relatives of dinosaurs are birds and crocodiles, and they don’t sound anything alike. Did a Velociraptor sound more like a goose or an alligator? Did it even have a voice at all?
    While no one’s ever heard a real dinosaur, someone behind the scenes had to figure out what they might sound like and then create that sound for the audience by using bits and pieces of the world around us. That’s where sound designers and Foley artists come in, the artists who use sound to bring the unreal to life.
    If you've watched the end credits of a movie and wondered just what a Foley artist is, and why they're called Foley artists, it all started with sound artist Jack Foley and the 1929 movie Show Boat. Show Boat was meant to be a silent film, but silent movies were already on their way out, and a Broadway musical based on the same book had just made its debut the year before. Producers worried that audiences would not only want sound but would also expect to hear their favorite songs from the musical. With no time to go back and film the movie all over again, they turned to Jack Foley to record a separate audio track, creating sounds like footsteps and raindrops using whatever he could find in the studio. It was the very first film to use what are now called Foley effects, and this technique of creating post-production sound effects is named after him.
    If you’d like to see a pair of Foley artists at work, creating the sound effects for a movie scene using everything from empty bottles to heads of lettuce, just watch the video below:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OONaPcZ4EAs (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OONaPcZ4EAs)
    Since there aren’t any dinosaurs to come into the studio and record their lines, sound artists for the Jurassic Park movies faced the challenge of giving voices to creatures that no one has ever heard before. They did this by piecing together all sorts of other ordinary sounds. That famous Tyrannosaurus roar, for instance, is the sound of a baby elephant slowed down and mixed with a growling tiger and a bellowing alligator. Those barking Velociraptors are mostly the sounds of turtles mating, with just a dash of angry geese.
    Many of the sounds we hear in a movie, even the ones that seem simple enough, are often something quite different. When a legion of Roman soldiers in Spartacus needed to clang dramatically, and it turned out their real armor just sounded like rattling pots and pans, Jack Foley solved it by dangling his keys in front of a microphone. Whenever the sliding doors aboard the starship Enterprise swish open on Star Trek, that’s really just a piece of paper being pulled out of an envelope. And it may be a little harder to see a dramatic kiss in the rain the same way once you know what we’re actually hearing. Check out this short video to find out if you can tell the difference between pattering raindrops and sizzling bacon:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OAG8IbNrYbo (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OAG8IbNrYbo)
    What about a whole universe that exists only onscreen? When Star Wars: A New Hope first came out in 1977, it didn’t just revolutionize the visual effects industry: it also made a big impact on cinematic sound design. From droids and lightsabers to TIE fighters and Darth Vader’s mask, sound designer Ben Burtt had to invent all sorts of new sounds that don’t resemble anything we’d usually hear.
    There’s no mistaking the hum of a lightsaber for anything else, even though we don’t really have lightsabers. That sound comes from a film projector motor mixed with the electric hum of a microphone held too close to a TV set. To

    Interview with Voice Coach, Professional Speaker, & Best-Selling Author, Cynthia Zhai - Part 2

    Interview with Voice Coach, Professional Speaker, & Best-Selling Author, Cynthia Zhai - Part 2

    This is the second part of my interview with Cynthia Zhai. We continue our conversation about the different ways you can improve your voice along with the technical workings of it. There are a lot of actionable pieces of advice in this interview!

    We discuss:
    people who think they sound like a man or vice versa
    The physical science behind vocal sound
    The work Cynthia does with her male clients to help their vocals sound deeper
    The work Cynthia does with her female clients to lighten up their voices
    The use of too much force and how it makes women sound more masculine
    Resonance’s effect on the vocal cords and what exactly it is
    How most people only use 4 out of the 5 cavities for resonance
    The consequence of breathing incorrectly
    What the 5 cavities of resonance are
    Most people don’t use the chest cavity
    How to correct your breathing and have more control over your resonance
    Case studies of people who worked on their vocals to improve
    A woman who lost out on a promotion twice because of her voice and how working with Cynthia changed that
    The other side effects that happen when you work on your voice - happiness, optimism, being more positive
    The connection between voice and mindset
    Your voice is connected to your entire body and has a huge impact
    The second case study with a man who was depressed and afraid of losing parts of his life
    When he worked on his voice, his happiness changed and he no longer had to worry about his job or his marriage
    The connection between progressing as a person and progressing in relationships
    The steps necessary to improve your voice
    Observing when you’re holding your breath - when speaking or otherwise
    Releasing stress with your breath and voice
    Adding in emotion when talking about techniques to improve your voice
    The day-to-day effects on the voice
    When you block your emotions, you block your energy flow
    Observing how great speakers speak with emotion
    Group coaching with Cynthia - find her on social media
    You can find more information about Cynthia Zhai:
    On her website: powerfulexecutivevoice.com
    On her TED Talk: https://youtu.be/PcDerWSyccg
    This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco (http://www.humbertofranco.com/).
    Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast? If so, here’s the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 And if you like what you hear (and read!) – please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much!
    And if you’re interested in crafting an audio brand for your business, why not check out my FREE download – 5 Tips For Implementing An Intentional Audio Strategy at https://voiceoversandvocals.com/audio-branding-strategy/

    Interview with Voice Coach, Professional Speaker, & Best-Selling Author, Cynthia Zhai - Part 1

    Interview with Voice Coach, Professional Speaker, & Best-Selling Author, Cynthia Zhai - Part 1

    In this interview, I’m speaking with someone who has a real knack for voice - Cynthia Zhai. She’s helped people from over 46 countries around the world improve their voices and speak with impact and conviction. If you’ve been wanting to improve the quality of your voice, this is the interview for you!
    We discuss:
    Cynthia’s current living situation during COVID
    Cynthia’s background in singing and voice
    Falling into becoming a voice coach
    The development of her work - how do you change your voice?
    The realization people have had in the last year about the tone of a good voice
    If the tone of voice is low quality, then people won’t hear the content as well as they could
    Conveying emotions through our voices
    The science behind an attractive voice
    The voice sends out vibrations and some frequencies are more attractive/easier to listen to
    The constriction of the vocal cords and how it effects voice frequency
    Stress’s effect on the voice
    Authenticity’s part in producing a relaxed voice
    The importance of breathing when it comes to voice
    How to breathe properly when doing any sort of speaking
    The balloon analogy that gives a great visual for the proper way to breathe
    The importance of having proper voice quality for your brand
    Authenticity and relaxation and their importance for podcast hosts and guests
    Matching your voice to your brand
    Ways to improve your voice if you don’t like the sound of it
    The reason why your voice sounds differently to you than when you listen to a recording of it

    You can find more information about Cynthia Zhai:
    On her website: powerfulexecutivevoice.com
    On her TED Talk: https://youtu.be/PcDerWSyccg
    This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco (http://www.humbertofranco.com/).
    Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast? If so, here’s the Apple Podcast link: https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 And if you like what you hear (and read!) – please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much!
    And if you’re interested in crafting an audio brand for your business, why not check out my FREE download – 5 Tips For Implementing An Intentional Audio Strategy at https://voiceoversandvocals.com/audio-branding-strategy/

    Sounds of the Times

    Sounds of the Times

    Imagine you’re a child and you’re riding in the back seat of a car at night. You watch the trees passing by you through the window, and then you close your eyes so you can feel the vibrations through the seat. All the while the engine softly rumbles all around you, surrounding you like a blanket. Over half of parents surveyed said they’ve used “dream drives,” taking their children on a drive at night just to help them fall asleep. But what if you’re driving an electric vehicle? Would it still have that soothing rumble?
    Last year Nissan partnered with Tom Middleton to find a way to preserve this timeless experience in the Nissan LEAF, an electric car that would normally be completely silent. To help the LEAF sound and feel more like an old-fashioned car, Middleton created an ambient album of combustion engine sounds called the “Nissan Leaf Dream Drive” that’s available on Spotify, Google Play and other platforms. To learn more about it, just click the link below:
    https://www.edelman.com/work/nissan-dream-drive (https://www.edelman.com/work/nissan-dream-drive)
    This isn’t the first time sounds have been added to electric vehicles to make them seem more familiar, and it won’t be the last. A new EU law mandates that by this July all hybrid and electric vehicles will need an “acoustic vehicle alert system” to make sure pedestrians can hear approaching vehicles. Those sounds are required to resemble a gasoline engine, and to scale up and down with the vehicle’s speed. A similar “quiet car” law will take effect in the United States this March, after a six-month extension.
    Electric cars are just one example of how new technology is changing many of the sounds we take for granted, and how we’re working to bring those sounds back in new ways. You may have heard of the “coconut effect,” especially if you’re a fan of old westerns or a certain Monty Python movie. Whether it’s coconut shells clapping to imitate galloping horses, or the squealing tires during every car chase, or whirring, beeping computers, there are sounds in movies that we just expect to be there. It turns out that many of the sounds we take for granted in our lives work much the same way.
    If you’ve ever had a cell phone call drop – and who hasn’t? - you could probably tell after just a second that the line’s dead. But how did you know? Though we don’t usually notice it, there’s a slight background hum added to digital telephones called a “comfort noise.” It’s only there when the line’s open, and when that hum stops we know that the call’s ended without even really thinking about it.
    That hum was just a side effect for landline phones, but we’ve become so used to it that, even though modern phones don’t really need it, we’ve added it back in. Smartphones also do this with buttons that click when you press them, even though you’re just tapping a screen, while haptic feedback gives your hand a slight jolt with each click. It doesn’t need to do that, but it wouldn’t feel right for us if it didn’t. From rumbling vacuum cleaners and clicking car locks, from satellite radios with fake static to potato chips meant to crunch with each bite, a surprising number of sounds around us are intentionally designed to enhance our lives. For a closer look at some of them, check out this video:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZOpDve8ARA (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZOpDve8ARA)
    As digital technology expands and replaces older, mechanical sounds with silence, it turns out that at least some of those background noises, whether it’s the rumble of a car engine or the hiss of a phone line, are still pretty useful. Sound remains an important part of our lives, and in many ways the audio industry is now working to replace and improve upon those missing sounds.
    Most of us aren’t that comfortable with things being

    Interview with Hamish Macdonald, Managing Director, Squeak E. Clean Studios - Part 2

    Interview with Hamish Macdonald, Managing Director, Squeak E. Clean Studios - Part 2

    This is the second part of my interview with Hamish Macdonald. In our first part, we discussed how he has embraced the audio branding world and what that’s meant for his company, Squeak E Clean Studios. Now, we’re discussing the importance of sound and how it plays out for different companies. Audio branding has become an increasingly sought after part of a company to help with reaching customers. I loved hearing Hamish’s take on this!
    In this episode, we talked about:
    What exactly spacial sound work is
    How spacial sound encourages people to take action by using specific sounds
    Hamish was tasked with creating spacial sound for a car company and how it integrated into a whole experience for the audience
    He uses outside help to create different aspects of various projects
    Hamish is willing to find the best person for the job and make sure every customer is getting the best product possible
    You don’t really know if something is a successful sonic logo until it’s been out in the world
    Netflix was once deemed as the most popular sonic logo and now it’s starting to have negative connotations
    Hamish speculates that Netflix’s negative connotations are actually a reflection of how the consumer feels about the amount of time they’ve spent binging
    Some sonic logos become annoying and don’t have a positive experience for the consumer
    Sound and music are some of the best ways to communicate across cultures and countries
    The different companies that have taken away visual branding and moved toward sound branding and logos
    Hamish had a conversation with a colleague about why some companies are more willing to spend money on a visual brand instead of a sonic brand
    Companies want their logos and brands to withstand the test of time
    Hamish says that companies should invest in an audio brand because you can reach people across cultures and where the industries are moving
    If companies are not using an audio brand, they are missing out on a large part of their own market
    COVID has drastically changed how audio branding is received and needed for the customer experience
    It’s important to use sound strategically and not invade people’s personal space
    If you’d like to learn more about Hamish or Squeak E. Clean, you can find more info here:
    On LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hamishmacdonald2/
    The Squeak E. Clean Website: www.squeakeclean.com
    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/squeakeclean/
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/squeakecleanstudios/
    This episode was very skillfully made to sound beautiful by the talented Humberto Franco (http://www.humbertofranco.com/ (http://www.humbertofranco.com/)).


    Would you consider reviewing the Audio Branding Podcast? If so, here’s the Apple Podcast link:https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453 ( https://podcasts.apple.com/podcast/audio-branding/id1489042453) And if you like what you hear (and read!) – please do share it with anyone you think might be interested. Thanks so much!
    And if you’re interested in crafting an audio brand for your business, why not check out my FREE download –https://voiceoversandvocals.com/audio-branding-strategy/ ( 5 Tips For Implementing An Intentional Audio Strategy) at https://voiceoversandvocals.com/audio-branding-strategy/ (https://voiceoversandvocals.com/audio-branding-strategy/)

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
33 Ratings

33 Ratings

Mike GMK ,

Secret weapon hidden in plain sight

I wish I had some power to put this 'cast in front of everyone who writes advertising. Most people who write it in the digital age are absolutely unaware of the power of sound & the spoken word.

So along comes Jodi with the most powerful communication tool there is, hidden in plain sight: the spoken word. And not just that, but proof, in episode after episode, of the power audio has to affect our very thoughts. What marketer or brand manager wouldn't want that?

I've done sound design, scripting, production, and voice for radio, tv, and videos for - um, well, a good while, am now listening to every episode of this show. I'm learning new things about sound in nearly every show.

For anyone in advertising, video, audiobooks, television and whatever I've missed - this podcast is of great value.

ElaineAGrant ,

Insightful, practical, eye-opening

As a veteran public radio producer and host, and now an entrepreneur running a podcast consultancy, I thought I knew a lot about the world of audio. Truth is, I knew just a small slice of this big and important world. I’ve learned so much from every episode! I need to re-listen and furiously take notes. I can’t recommend Audio Branding highly enough.

mobilehomegurl ,

Excellent show!

Jodi really knows her stuff. As a podcaster, she’s taught me a lot about voice work and how to improve it. I like that her show is a mix of guests in the entertainment industry and she also dedicates some time to teaching you how to improve your voice through audio work. Subscribe today!

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