5 episodes

The re-emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement has provoked a cultural reckoning about how Black stories are told and is creating new opportunities for the media to disrupt the patterns of the past.

Black Stories Matter is an audio series made up of five groundbreaking conversations from media researchers, historians, former policy makers and Aboriginal journalists on how mainstream media has failed in its telling of Black stories.

By understanding how the mainstream media has failed, we can also see the pathways to telling the Black stories that can change Australia's future.

Black Stories Matter was made by Impact Studios at the University of Technology Sydney- an audio production house combining academic research with audio storytelling for real world impact.

The podcast was made with the support of Aboriginal Affairs NSW as part of a strategy to improve the dynamics between Aboriginal people and governments.

Black Stories Matter Impact Studios at UTS

    • Education

The re-emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement has provoked a cultural reckoning about how Black stories are told and is creating new opportunities for the media to disrupt the patterns of the past.

Black Stories Matter is an audio series made up of five groundbreaking conversations from media researchers, historians, former policy makers and Aboriginal journalists on how mainstream media has failed in its telling of Black stories.

By understanding how the mainstream media has failed, we can also see the pathways to telling the Black stories that can change Australia's future.

Black Stories Matter was made by Impact Studios at the University of Technology Sydney- an audio production house combining academic research with audio storytelling for real world impact.

The podcast was made with the support of Aboriginal Affairs NSW as part of a strategy to improve the dynamics between Aboriginal people and governments.

    Chipping away at the fourth wall - fighting media silence and looking to the future

    Chipping away at the fourth wall - fighting media silence and looking to the future

    First Nations in Australia have had extraordinary patience in the face of extraordinary denial.

    In the words of Yothu Yindi's song, Treaty, Aboriginal people have repeatedly seen "promises can disappear just like writing in the sand."

    In this series we've talked about how the media has repeatedly failed Aboriginal political aspirations and how Australia's media landscape requires a transformation that needs to go much deeper than issues of representation.

    In this episode of Black Stories Matter, we're going to be hearing from leading Aboriginal journalists who have faced these barriers from inside the newsrooms and are carving out their own pathway to tell Black stories.

    Chaired by Amy Thomas from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at University Technology Sydney, the discussion features Kamilaroi woman and Indigenous Affairs reporter at the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, Ella Archibald-Binge, descendent from the Gamilaraay and Yawalaraay nation and The Guardian's Indigenous Affairs editor, Lorena Allam, and UTS Lecturer from the School of Communication, Dr Anne Maree Payne.

    This podcast is inspired by the book 'Does the Media Fail Aboriginal Political Aspirations: 45 years of news media reporting of key political moments' by Amy Thomas, Heidi Norman and Andrew Jakubowicz from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at UTS.

    The Black Stories Matter podcast was made with the support of Aboriginal Affairs New South Wales as part of a strategy to improve the dynamics between Aboriginal people and governments.

    • 53 min
    Independent Black Media on sovereignty and self determination

    Independent Black Media on sovereignty and self determination

    We know that bad reporting can lead to bad policy and this can adversely affect the lives of First Nations people.

    So far in this series, we've heard how the Australian mainstream media has failed to connect with Aboriginal communities. But for Aboriginal journalists deeply embedded in their communities, it's a completely different story.

    In this episode, we're looking to independent black media, to hear what Aboriginal journalists can teach us about the stories told around sovereignty and self determination and how we can support Black media.

    *Please be advised this podcast contains discussions about topics some listeners may find distressing. You can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14*.

    Chaired by Bhuva Narayan from the University of Technology Sydney, this discussion features Madeline Hayman-Reber a Gomeroi woman, freelance journalist and Media Advisor to Senator Lidia Thorpe, Rachael Hocking, Warlpiri woman and NITV journalist and co-host of The Point, and Associate Professor Tanja Dreher from UNSW, an expert in settler listening.

    This podcast is inspired by the book 'Does the Media Fail Aboriginal Political Aspirations: 45 years of news media reporting of key political moments' by Amy Thomas, Heidi Norman and Andrew Jakubowicz from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at UTS.

    The Black Stories Matter podcast was made with the support of Aboriginal Affairs New South Wales as part of a strategy to improve the dynamics between Aboriginal people and governments.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    A test we have always failed: A history of Aboriginal politics in the media

    A test we have always failed: A history of Aboriginal politics in the media

    It was 1992, when Prime Minister Paul Keating spoke to the mostly Aboriginal crowd that had gathered in Redfern Park in inner city Sydney.

    This was the first time a Prime Minister had spoken about the dispossession, violence and prejudice carried out against First Nations people in Australia.

    It was a landmark moment in our history. And it put reconciliation firmly on the political agenda.

    But 28 years after Keating gave his speech, we still haven't passed the test he set for this nation.

    In this episode of Black Stories Matter, we draw on our guests' expertise in media and government to reflect on failure and hope in Aboriginal political history- and what we need to do next.

    Chaired by Andrew Jakubowicz from the University of Technology Sydney, this discussion features Robert Tickner, the Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs at the time of Keating's speech, Jason Ardler, who's cultural ties are to the Yuin people of the NSW South Coast and he is the former head of NSW Aboriginal Affairs and Arrente and Luritja woman Catherine Liddle, the CEO of First Nations Media.

    This podcast is inspired by the book 'Does the Media Fail Aboriginal Political Aspirations: 45 years of news media reporting of key political moments' by Amy Thomas, Heidi Norman and Andrew Jakubowicz from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at UTS.

    The Black Stories Matter podcast was made with the support of Aboriginal Affairs New South Wales as part of a strategy to improve the dynamics between Aboriginal people and governments.

    • 1 hr 6 min
    Does the Media Fail Aboriginal Political Aspirations?

    Does the Media Fail Aboriginal Political Aspirations?

    A white lens has distorted Black stories ever since Captain James Cook took possession of the continent now known as Australia and since that time the interests of settlers have dominated media reporting on Aboriginal people.

    This matters because reporting shapes the way Aboriginal political worlds are understood and talked about and the storyteller is often the most powerful person in the room.

    In the first of five landmark conversations we ask 'Does the Media Fail Aboriginal Political Aspirations?'

    This discussion is chaired by Professor Devleena Ghosh from the University of Technology, Sydney and features Professor Stan Grant Jnr, Wiradjuri man, Vice Chancellor's Chair of Australian-Indigenous Belonging at Charles Sturt University and former ABC Global Affairs and Indigenous Affairs Analyst, along with Professor Heidi Norman from the Indigenous Land & Justice Research Hub at UTS and host of Black Stories Matter.

    This podcast is inspired by the book 'Does the Media Fail Aboriginal Political Aspirations: 45 years of news media reporting of key political moments' by Amy Thomas, Heidi Norman and Andrew Jakubowicz from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at UTS.

    The Black Stories Matter podcast was made with the support of Aboriginal Affairs New South Wales as part of a strategy to improve the dynamics between Aboriginal people and governments.

    • 45 min
    Introducing Black Stories Matter

    Introducing Black Stories Matter

    Ever since Captain James Cook evaded British instructions to take possession of the continent now known as Australia "with the consent of the natives", the interests of settlers have dominated media reporting on Aboriginal people.

    This year, there's been a global awakening. The events of 2020 including the Black Lives Matter movement and COVID-19 have challenged traditional narratives, creating new opportunities for how we tell stories, who tells them and what stories are told.

    Black Stories Matter is a five-part series that brings together media researchers, historians, former policy makers and Aboriginal journalists whose work is disrupting the patterns of the past.

    Our guests have had front row seats to what's gone wrong in Australian media reporting and share with us how Aboriginal perspectives have been silenced, and what the media can do to make things right.

    It's time to start a new narrative about Aboriginal people, with Aboriginal people because Black Stories Matter.


    The Black Stories Matter podcast is hosted by Professor Heidi Norman and Amy Thomas and was produced by Impact Studios at the University of Technology Sydney - an audio production house that combines academic research with audio storytelling for real world impact.

    This podcast is inspired by the book
    'Does the Media Fail Aboriginal Political Aspirations: 45 years of news media reporting of key political moments' by Amy Thomas, Heidi Norman and Andrew Jakubowicz from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at UTS.

    The Black Stories Matter podcast was made with the support of Aboriginal Affairs New South Wales as part of a strategy to improve the dynamics between Aboriginal people and governments.

    • 6 min

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